5

Context

I have several groups of data (defined by 3 columns w/i the dataframe) and would like perform a linear fit and each group and then append the estimate values (with lower + upper bounds of the fit).

Problem

After performing the operation, I get an error related to the shapes of the final vs original dataframes

Example that demonstrates the problem:

from io import StringIO       # modern python
#from StringIO import StringIO # old python
import numpy
import pandas

def fake_model(group, formula):
    # add the results to the group
    modeled = group.assign(
        fit=numpy.random.normal(size=group.shape[0]),
        ci_lower=numpy.random.normal(size=group.shape[0]),
        ci_upper=numpy.random.normal(size=group.shape[0])
    )

    return modeled

raw_csv = StringIO("""\
location,days,era,chemical,conc
MW-A,2415,modern,"Chem1",5.4
MW-A,7536,modern,"Chem1",0.21
MW-A,7741,modern,"Chem1",0.15
MW-A,2415,modern,"Chem2",33.0
MW-A,2446,modern,"Chem2",0.26
MW-A,3402,modern,"Chem2",0.18
MW-A,3626,modern,"Chem2",0.26
MW-A,7536,modern,"Chem2",0.32
MW-A,7741,modern,"Chem2",0.24
""")

data = pandas.read_csv(raw_csv)

modeled = (
    data.groupby(by=['location', 'era', 'chemical'])
        .apply(fake_model, formula='conc ~ days')
        .reset_index(drop=True)
)

That raises a very long traceback, the crux of which is:

[snip]   
C:\Miniconda3\envs\puente\lib\site-packages\pandas\core\internals.py in construction_error(tot_items, block_shape, axes, e)
   3880         raise e
   3881     raise ValueError("Shape of passed values is {0}, indices imply {1}".format(
-> 3882         passed,implied))
   3883 
   3884 

ValueError: Shape of passed values is (8, 9), indices imply (8, 6)

I understand that I added three columns, hence a shape of (8, 9) vs (8, 6).

What I don't understand is that if I inspect the dataframe subgroup in the slightest way, the above error is not raised:

def fake_model2(group, formula):
    _ = group.name
    return fake_model(group, formula)

modeled = (
    data.groupby(by=['location', 'era', 'chemical'])
        .apply(fake_model2, formula='conc ~ days')
        .reset_index(drop=True)
)

print(modeled)

Which produces:

  location  days     era chemical   conc  ci_lower  ci_upper       fit
0     MW-A  2415  modern    Chem1   5.40 -0.466833 -0.599039 -1.143867
1     MW-A  7536  modern    Chem1   0.21 -1.790619 -0.532233 -1.356336
2     MW-A  7741  modern    Chem1   0.15  1.892256 -0.405768 -0.718673
3     MW-A  2415  modern    Chem2  33.00  0.428811  0.259244 -1.259238
4     MW-A  2446  modern    Chem2   0.26 -1.616517 -0.955750 -0.727216
5     MW-A  3402  modern    Chem2   0.18 -0.300749  0.341106  0.602332
6     MW-A  3626  modern    Chem2   0.26 -0.232240  1.845240  1.340124
7     MW-A  7536  modern    Chem2   0.32 -0.416087 -0.521973 -1.477748
8     MW-A  7741  modern    Chem2   0.24  0.958202  0.634742  0.542667

Question

My work-around feels far too hacky to use in any real-world application. Is there a better way to apply my model and include the best-fit estimates to each group within the larger dataframe?

3
  • 1
    pd.concat([fake_model(v, 'conc ~ days') for _, v in data.groupby(['location', 'era', 'chemical'])]) is slightly less hacky, but not ideal. Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 20:20
  • thanks @TomAugspurger -- Is this (my code) generally an abuse of groupby(...).apply(...)?
    – Paul H
    Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 20:22
  • I dunno about abusing, but maybe stretching. That fact that your hacky solution succeeds says this is probably a bug though. Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

4

Yay, a non-hacky workaround exists

In [18]: gr = data.groupby(['location', 'era', 'chemical'], group_keys=False)

In [19]: gr.apply(fake_model, formula='')
Out[19]:
  location  days     era chemical   conc  ci_lower  ci_upper       fit
0     MW-A  2415  modern    Chem1   5.40 -0.105610 -0.056310  1.344210
1     MW-A  7536  modern    Chem1   0.21  0.574092  1.305544  0.411960
2     MW-A  7741  modern    Chem1   0.15 -0.073439  0.140920 -0.679837
3     MW-A  2415  modern    Chem2  33.00  1.959547  0.382794  0.544158
4     MW-A  2446  modern    Chem2   0.26  0.484376  0.400111 -0.450741
5     MW-A  3402  modern    Chem2   0.18 -0.422490  0.323525  0.520716
6     MW-A  3626  modern    Chem2   0.26 -0.093855 -1.487398  0.222687
7     MW-A  7536  modern    Chem2   0.32  0.124983 -0.484532 -1.162127
8     MW-A  7741  modern    Chem2   0.24 -1.622693  0.949825 -1.049279

That actually saves you a .reset_index too :)

group_keys was the culprit behind the error. The maybe bug in pandas come from a regular concat of each group. With group_keys=True thats

[('MW-A', 'modern', 'Chem1'), ('MW-A', 'modern', 'Chem2')]

which pandas wasn't expecting. This smells like a bug in pandas, but haven't dug more to confirm.

4
  • Thank you much, Tom! This works on my full dataset (~75 groups in total).
    – Paul H
    Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 21:28
  • side note: the grouped_keys kwarg actually does what I thought as_index did.
    – Paul H
    Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 21:30
  • I can never remember what those two do, and typically try permutations till it works[ Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 21:46
  • So, is it a bug or not? ;) Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 0:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.