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I have looked all over the place, but I have not found an answer to my question. First of all, I know that the symbol for decimal is %d, the symbol for octal is %o, and the symbol for hexadecimal is %x. What I cannot find, however, is the symbol for binary. I would appreciate any help.

marked as duplicate by dbush c Mar 10 '16 at 20:48

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4

The reason you're having trouble finding a format specifier for printing integers in binary is because there isn't one. You'll have to write you're own function to print numbers in binary.

So for a single unsigned byte:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

void print_bin(unsigned char byte)
{
    int i = CHAR_BIT; /* however many bits are in a byte on your platform */
    while(i--) {
        putchar('0' + ((byte >> i) & 1)); /* loop through and print the bits */
    }
}

And for a standard unsigned int:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

void print_bin(unsigned int integer)
{
    int i = CHAR_BIT * sizeof integer; /* however many bits are in an integer */
    while(i--) {
        putchar('0' + ((integer >> i) & 1)); 
    }
}

Adjust the function for larger integers accordingly. Be wary of signed shifting though because the behavior is undefined and entirely compiler dependent.

  • The loop for(; i > 0; --i) { is wrong; for 32 bit ints it will start at 32. my suggestion: while i--) { – wildplasser Mar 12 '16 at 19:04
  • @wildplasser thanks, edited. – PC Luddite Mar 12 '16 at 22:27
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There isn't one. If you want to output in binary, just write code to do it.

  • 1
    more like a comment ? – machine_1 Mar 10 '16 at 21:01
  • 1
    It completely answers his question. If a complete answer should be a comment, then it's a bad question. But I don't see anything wrong with the question. – David Schwartz Mar 10 '16 at 21:16
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There is no direct way. One way, you could make a look-up table that converts a byte to a const char * of 1's and 0's. Then you could iterate through the bytes and print out what is in the look-up table.

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The %c formatting specifier is what you are looking for. It converts the int operand to char and outputs that unchanged.

  • 3
    I don't believe that was the intent. I think OP simply wants to format integers as binary strings, e.g. 10 would appear as "1010". – Tom Karzes Mar 10 '16 at 20:49

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