2

I'm learning Haskell and coming from Python, so list comprehensions are familiar. Take this list comprehension (please):

[x^2 | x <- [1..10], x^2 < 50]
[1,4,9,16,25,36,49]

Does the expression x^2 get evaluated twice on every value of x here? Is there a way to write this comprehension such that the expression x^2 is only evaluated once? Would it make sense to do something like this instead:

filter (< 50) [x^2 | x <- [1..10]]
[1,4,9,16,25,36,49]

Is that the more "Haskell way" of doing things? And also is it more efficient?

  • It depends on whether GHC decides to do common subexpression elimination. This looks like an easy case to me, so I expect GHC will optimise it for you (if you have optimisations turned on, of course) and the two implementations will perform identically. Someone with better low-level GHC experience than me can probably show you the generated Core and point out the optimisations. I do think your second implementation is easier to read, though. – Benjamin Hodgson Mar 11 '16 at 0:43
  • 1
    For what it's worth, I'd probably use a pointfree style for this: filter (< 50) $ map (^ 2) [1..10] – Chris Martin Mar 11 '16 at 0:52
  • 1
    @ChrisMartin I guess I don't know how idiomatic comprehensions are in Haskell. I use them everywhere in Python. Any thoughts? – Evan Zamir Mar 11 '16 at 0:55
  • 3
    List comprehensions also support let bindings: [y | x <- [1..10], let y = x ^ 2, y < 50]. – Jon Purdy Mar 11 '16 at 1:48
  • 1
    What @JonPurdy said. --- also, can you guess what [y | x <- [1..], let y = x ^ 2, y < 50] will do? (then, look at Data.List.takeWhile). – Will Ness Mar 11 '16 at 1:58
7

You can use let in list comprehensions:

[ z | x <- [1..10], let z = x^2, z < 50]

and then x^2 is only evaluated once.

4

I'd do it this way, which is similar to your second example:

filter (<50) (map (^2) [1..10])

I'm biased against list comprehensions. They basically only do three things (mapping, filtering and cross products), and you want to have a much bigger vocabulary of operations than just those three. Study the Data.List module.

As to performance, we can easily benchmark it without too much effort by using the criterion library. (I've put a repo here—you can build this with the Stack tool.)

import Criterion.Main

main = defaultMain
       [ bgroup "one" [ bench "10"    $ nf one 10
                      , bench "100"   $ nf one 100
                      , bench "1000"  $ nf one 1000
                      , bench "10000" $ nf one 10000
                      ]
       , bgroup "two" [ bench "10"    $ nf two 10
                      , bench "100"   $ nf two 100
                      , bench "1000"  $ nf two 1000
                      , bench "10000" $ nf two 10000
                      ]
       , bgroup "three" [ bench "10"    $ nf three 10
                        , bench "100"   $ nf three 100
                        , bench "1000"  $ nf three 1000
                        , bench "10000" $ nf three 10000
                        ]
       ]

one :: Int -> Int
one n = sum [x^2 | x <- [1..n], x^2 < n*5]

two :: Int -> Int
two n = sum (filter (<(5*n)) [x^2 | x <- [1..n]])

three :: Int -> Int
three n = sum (filter (<(5*n)) (map (^2) [1..n]))

I get these results, which to me suggest that it doesn't make a big difference (if any):

% stack install --ghc-options='-O2'
Copied executables to /Users/luis.casillas/.local/bin:
- comprehension

% comprehension
benchmarking one/10
time                 18.40 ns   (18.35 ns .. 18.45 ns)
                     1.000 R²   (1.000 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 18.38 ns   (18.33 ns .. 18.42 ns)
std dev              143.7 ps   (116.9 ps .. 173.6 ps)

benchmarking one/100
time                 89.11 ns   (88.49 ns .. 89.72 ns)
                     1.000 R²   (1.000 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 88.78 ns   (88.42 ns .. 89.44 ns)
std dev              1.582 ns   (1.231 ns .. 2.103 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 23% (moderately inflated)

benchmarking one/1000
time                 649.2 ns   (640.7 ns .. 658.7 ns)
                     0.998 R²   (0.998 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 647.6 ns   (637.8 ns .. 658.0 ns)
std dev              31.40 ns   (24.70 ns .. 40.84 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 66% (severely inflated)

benchmarking one/10000
time                 6.197 μs   (6.079 μs .. 6.282 μs)
                     0.997 R²   (0.996 R² .. 0.998 R²)
mean                 6.180 μs   (6.058 μs .. 6.295 μs)
std dev              436.0 ns   (371.1 ns .. 531.8 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 77% (severely inflated)

benchmarking two/10
time                 20.23 ns   (19.89 ns .. 20.56 ns)
                     0.999 R²   (0.998 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 19.89 ns   (19.71 ns .. 20.11 ns)
std dev              709.8 ps   (582.1 ps .. 939.1 ps)
variance introduced by outliers: 58% (severely inflated)

benchmarking two/100
time                 83.95 ns   (83.14 ns .. 84.90 ns)
                     0.999 R²   (0.999 R² .. 1.000 R²)
mean                 83.34 ns   (82.59 ns .. 83.99 ns)
std dev              2.354 ns   (1.890 ns .. 3.043 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 44% (moderately inflated)

benchmarking two/1000
time                 645.3 ns   (635.8 ns .. 655.4 ns)
                     0.998 R²   (0.997 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 652.9 ns   (643.1 ns .. 664.5 ns)
std dev              35.54 ns   (29.67 ns .. 46.19 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 71% (severely inflated)

benchmarking two/10000
time                 6.268 μs   (6.142 μs .. 6.385 μs)
                     0.998 R²   (0.997 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 6.200 μs   (6.099 μs .. 6.367 μs)
std dev              397.6 ns   (261.9 ns .. 637.4 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 73% (severely inflated)

benchmarking three/10
time                 18.96 ns   (18.66 ns .. 19.32 ns)
                     0.998 R²   (0.998 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 19.17 ns   (18.92 ns .. 19.49 ns)
std dev              990.6 ps   (774.2 ps .. 1.393 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 75% (severely inflated)

benchmarking three/100
time                 89.01 ns   (88.39 ns .. 89.78 ns)
                     0.998 R²   (0.997 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 92.60 ns   (90.78 ns .. 98.08 ns)
std dev              9.138 ns   (5.755 ns .. 14.22 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 91% (severely inflated)

benchmarking three/1000
time                 638.9 ns   (627.9 ns .. 648.7 ns)
                     0.996 R²   (0.994 R² .. 0.998 R²)
mean                 643.6 ns   (627.9 ns .. 660.6 ns)
std dev              48.67 ns   (38.78 ns .. 61.57 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 83% (severely inflated)

benchmarking three/10000
time                 6.060 μs   (5.989 μs .. 6.119 μs)
                     0.998 R²   (0.997 R² .. 0.999 R²)
mean                 6.124 μs   (6.036 μs .. 6.240 μs)
std dev              359.7 ns   (294.9 ns .. 431.9 ns)
variance introduced by outliers: 69% (severely inflated)

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