13

I made an enum as:

enum class KeyPressSurfaces {
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DEFAULT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_UP,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DOWN,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_LEFT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_RIGHT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL
};

and later on I attempt to define an array as I typed below, but I received the error, size of array 'KEY_PRESS_SURFACES' has non-integral type 'KeyPressSurfaces'

SDL_Surface*KEY_PRESS_SURFACES[KeyPressSurfaces::KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL];

I understand the error fine, but I don't know where to move the KeyPressSurfaces to qualify the constant in the enum.

I also realize I could just use an enum and not an enum class, but I feel like this should work, and I want to learn how to do this.

Any response/advice is appreciated! Thanks!

  • why do you want so much to use an enum to specify the size of an array? The size should be a compile time constant. – formerlyknownas_463035818 Mar 11 '16 at 9:36
  • 7
    The enum is a compile time constant. – parsley72 Oct 2 '16 at 5:16
  • 1
    @user463035818 when you add more items on enum, the KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL automatically adjust. It's a good technique actually to use enum for the array size. When it's a constant number, you have to edit all part in the codes that are related to the size of that array specially on some computation where the size-of-the-array is involve. – acegs Aug 20 '18 at 2:20
  • 4
    I'm surprised no one else mentioned this: Given that enum classes are scoped, I would've thought half of the point of them is to avoid you having to repeat ugly prefixes like KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_ on every enumerator. You don't need to protect the global namespace anymore. By thinking you do, now you have to write it twice... KeyPressSurfaces::KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DEFAULT Yuk! Just drop the prefix, drop the ALL_CAPS too because there are no macros here, drop the plural that IMO is unnecessary and best reserved for instances of collections, and write KeyPressSurface::default. Much better. – underscore_d Sep 29 '18 at 9:15
13

Scoped enums (enum class) are not implicitly convertible to integers. You need to use a static_cast:

SDL_Surface*KEY_PRESS_SURFACES[static_cast<int>(KeyPressSurfaces::KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL)];
11

You can convert your enum to int using template function and you will get more readable code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

enum class KeyPressSurfaces: int {
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DEFAULT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_UP,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DOWN,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_LEFT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_RIGHT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL
};

template <typename E>
constexpr typename std::underlying_type<E>::type to_underlying(E e) {
    return static_cast<typename std::underlying_type<E>::type>(e);
}


int main() {
    KeyPressSurfaces val = KeyPressSurfaces::KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_UP;
    int valInt = to_underlying(val);
    std::cout << valInt << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I fount to_underlying function here

4

Remove the class keyword or cast explicitly to an integral type.

0

Alternatively you can replace your array with a map, which also means you can get rid of KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_TOTAL:

enum class KeyPressSurfaces {
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DEFAULT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_UP,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_DOWN,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_LEFT,
    KEY_PRESS_SURFACE_RIGHT
};

std::map<KeyPressSurfaces, SDL_Surface*> KEY_PRESS_SURFACES;
  • 2
    This isn't really a general solution to the problem, since std::map will be slower than using an array. – Kef Schecter Nov 18 '17 at 6:10
  • 1
    "Premature optimization is the root of all evil." - there's nothing in the question that suggests speed is an issue, the compiler may be clever enough to handle this and I find this a cleaner solution. – parsley72 Nov 18 '17 at 19:17
  • 12
    I'm pretty sure no compiler (past, present, or future) will turn an std::map into an array. There is also a difference between writing slow code because you don't want to optimize prematurely and writing slow code because you have no idea the construct you're using is slow. I happen to be writing a program myself right now (a chess engine) where the performance hit from using std::map would be utterly brutal. – Kef Schecter Nov 18 '17 at 22:12
  • 1
    @parsley72 that quote is not always accurate. Often the bugs cause by premature optimization is when your optimization target is for speed or memory-usage and you didn't consider other stuffs in your program. There are also other kind of optimization like optimize-for-maintainability-and-flexibility which will largely lessen the bugs and will be good for business in the long run. The production might be slow at first though but it's worth it. – acegs Aug 20 '18 at 2:10
  • 1
    I like @parsley72 idea. It clearly rises readability. – AngelM1981 Sep 20 '18 at 10:03

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