7

Please consider the following piece of code:

void error_handling();
bool method_impl();

bool method()
{
    const bool res = method_impl();
    if (res == false) {
        error_handling();
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

I know method_impl() will return true 99.999% (yes, three decimal places) of the time, but my compiler doesn't. method() is partially critical in term of time-consumption.

  1. Should I rewrite method() (and make it less readable) to ensure a jump may only occur when method_impl() returns false? If yes, how?
  2. Should I let the compiler do the work for me?
  3. Should I let the branch prediction of my CPU do the work for me?
10
  • 1
    How about "Optimizing branch prediction" for the title, since it has nothing to do with error handling? I'm pretty sure the answer is something like use likely/unlikely macros, but that is compiler specific.
    – nwp
    Mar 11, 2016 at 10:53
  • 1
    You should invert the logic so that the normal case is a fall through and the abnormal case is the implied else. This won't destroy readability. The way you have it now there is a branch 99.999% of the time.
    – user207421
    Mar 11, 2016 at 10:54
  • 1
    You could hint the compiler for your suggestion with __builtin_expect: stackoverflow.com/questions/1851299/… Mar 11, 2016 at 10:55
  • 1
    The underlying hardware already performs this optimizations. It will "fail" to predict it the first times, but after it will hit the correct option en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_predictor
    – Nadir
    Mar 11, 2016 at 10:57
  • @Nadir do you think branch prediction can be as good as using the GCC extension __builtin_expect?
    – YSC
    Mar 11, 2016 at 11:44

4 Answers 4

12

Following other answers' suggestions, I benchmarked the solutions. If you consider upvoting this answer, please upvote the others too.

Benchmark code

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

// solutions
#include <ctime>

// benchmak
#include <limits>
#include <random>
#include <chrono>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

//
// Solutions
//
namespace
{
    volatile std::time_t near_futur = -1;
    void error_handling() { std::cerr << "error\n"; }
    bool method_impl() { return std::time(NULL) != near_futur; }

    bool method_no_builtin()
    {
        const bool res = method_impl();
        if (res == false) {
            error_handling();
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    bool method_builtin()
    {
        const bool res = method_impl();
        if (__builtin_expect(res, 1) == false) {
            error_handling();
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    bool method_builtin_incorrect()
    {
        const bool res = method_impl();
        if (__builtin_expect(res, 0) == false) {
            error_handling();
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    bool method_rewritten()
    {
        const bool res = method_impl();
        if (res == true) {
            return true;
        } else {
            error_handling();
            return false;
        }
    }
}

//
// benchmark
//
constexpr std::size_t BENCHSIZE = 10'000'000;
class Clock
{
    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::steady_clock> _start;

public:
    static inline std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::steady_clock> now() { return std::chrono::steady_clock::now(); }

    Clock() : _start(now())
    {
    }

    template<class DurationUnit>
    std::size_t end()
    {
        return std::chrono::duration_cast<DurationUnit>(now() - _start).count();
    }
};

//
// Entry point
//
int main()
{
    {
        Clock clock;
        bool result = true;
        for (std::size_t i = 0 ; i < BENCHSIZE ; ++i)
        {
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
            result &= method_no_builtin();
        }
        const double unit_time = clock.end<std::chrono::nanoseconds>() / static_cast<double>(BENCHSIZE);
        std::cout << std::setw(40) << "method_no_builtin(): " << std::setprecision(3) << unit_time << " ns\n";
    }
    {
        Clock clock;
        bool result = true;
        for (std::size_t i = 0 ; i < BENCHSIZE ; ++i)
        {
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
            result &= method_builtin();
        }
        const double unit_time = clock.end<std::chrono::nanoseconds>() / static_cast<double>(BENCHSIZE);
        std::cout << std::setw(40) << "method_builtin(): " << std::setprecision(3) << unit_time << " ns\n";
    }
    {
        Clock clock;
        bool result = true;
        for (std::size_t i = 0 ; i < BENCHSIZE ; ++i)
        {
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
            result &= method_builtin_incorrect();
        }
        const double unit_time = clock.end<std::chrono::nanoseconds>() / static_cast<double>(BENCHSIZE);
        std::cout << std::setw(40) << "method_builtin_incorrect(): " << std::setprecision(3) << unit_time << " ns\n";
    }
    {
        Clock clock;
        bool result = true;
        for (std::size_t i = 0 ; i < BENCHSIZE ; ++i)
        {
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
            result &= method_rewritten();
        }
        const double unit_time = clock.end<std::chrono::nanoseconds>() / static_cast<double>(BENCHSIZE);
        std::cout << std::setw(40) << "method_rewritten(): " << std::setprecision(3) << unit_time << " ns\n";
    }
}

Benchmark results

g++ -std=c++14 -O2 -Wall -Wextra -Werror main.cpp

               method_no_builtin(): 42.8 ns
                  method_builtin(): 44.4 ns
        method_builtin_incorrect(): 51.4 ns
                method_rewritten(): 39.3 ns

Demo

g++ -std=c++14 -O3 -Wall -Wextra -Werror main.cpp

               method_no_builtin(): 32.3 ns
                  method_builtin(): 31.1 ns
        method_builtin_incorrect(): 35.6 ns
                method_rewritten(): 30.5 ns

Demo

Conclusion

The difference between those optimizations are too small to come to any conclusion other than: if there is a performance gain to find in optimizing a branch for a known more common path, this gain is too small to be worth the trouble and the loss in readability.

8
  • 3
    You have 11 trials in the first test and 10 in the other two. When you take out the 11th entry in the first test it falls in line with the other tests: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/2540c1a1f5d2b837 . Trying with -02 the first and last take the exact same amount of time: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/7f37496b4992755e
    – Sqeaky
    Aug 24, 2017 at 4:22
  • 1
    @Sqeaky Ho thank you! If only I could give you rep over that! I've edited my answer and its conclusion. Thank again.
    – YSC
    Aug 24, 2017 at 6:28
  • 3
    @immibis Excellent idea: done. Hope you're a patient person.
    – YSC
    Jan 11, 2019 at 13:17
  • 1
    I need to amend my comment by saying that apparently branch performance also matters and is possibly more significant than TLB/icache. I was under the impression that a correctly-predicted branch had a latency of 0-1 cycles, but this is only the case if the branch is correctly-predicted and not taken. If the branch is taken, even if correctly predicted, the latency is significantly longer. The worst case is predicted not taken but then taken. This blog post gives measurements on various x86 CPUs as well as the Apple M1: blog.cloudflare.com/branch-predictor Jun 24, 2021 at 15:33
  • 2
    Branch prediction resources like the BHT and BPB are limited, and in a real application the processor is going to lose history periodically. If your code is organized such that the most likely path is the one statically predicted by the processor, then on average you will come out ahead. What's really interesting is that, since not-taken branches are fast, reordering your code such that branches are more likely to be not taken than taken improves performance regardless of the predictors. GCC will most definitely reorder code based on __builtin_expect() hints. Jun 24, 2021 at 15:41
6

You could suggest the compiler that the method_impl() will return true:

void error_handling();
bool method_impl();

bool method()
{
    const bool res = method_impl();
    if (__builtin_expect (res, 0) == false) {
        error_handling();
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

This will work in GCC.

3
  • Will there be a benefit from just letting the branch predictor do its magic?
    – YSC
    Mar 11, 2016 at 11:43
  • Yes, and is broadly explained here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7346929/… Mar 11, 2016 at 11:45
  • 1
    The compiler rearranges the instructions to bias the "hinted" branch Mar 11, 2016 at 11:46
5

The underlying hardware already performs this optimizations. It will "fail" to predict it the first times, but after it will hit the correct option en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_predictor.

You can try applying the GCC extension and check if it is faster with it or not, but I think you will barely see any difference with it and without it. The branch prediction is applied always, it is not something you enable

0
0

Without knowing the implementation of std::time() I wouldn't conclude much from this test. From your own results, it seems like it dominates the time in the loop.

FWIW, I use likely()/unlikely() liberally myself when tuning code. I do not want to change the structure of the code, but when reading the assembly, I'd like to see the common path be a straight line of untaken branches. The key here (for me) is the readability of the assembly. The fact that this is also what will be fastest is secondary (the fastest possible branch is a correctly predicted untaken branch).

3
  • 1/ This is not an answer, rather a comment on my answer.
    – YSC
    Feb 12, 2018 at 9:38
  • 2/ std::time dominating the time consumption in the loop is the point. I'll let you read again the question ;)
    – YSC
    Feb 12, 2018 at 9:39
  • @T Thorn - The paragraph referring to std::time() indeed should be a comment to the previous post, and as we see distracts people from your actual, valid point concerning likely()/unlikely(). I suggest to remove the first paragraph.
    – Armali
    Feb 12, 2018 at 12:25

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