3

Writing my own vector class (for a game engine) and overloading '+' operator in Visual Studio 2013 CPlusPlus project (using VC runtime 120), it is throwing me compiler error:

Error: too many parameters for this operator function.

Code snippet from Vector.hpp file below.

Vector.hpp

class Vector
{
private:
    double i;
    double j;
    double k;
public:
    Vector(double _i, double _j, double _k)
    {
        i = _i;
        j = _j;
        k = _k;
    }

    Vector& operator+=(const Vector& p1)
    {
        i += p1.i;
        j += p1.j;
        k += p1.k;
        return *this;
    }

    //Some other functionality...

    Vector operator+(const Vector& p1, Vector& p2) //Error is thrown here...
    {
        Vector temp(p1);
        return temp += p2;
    }
};

enter image description here

What am I doing wrong here? Don't want to make my operator overload non-member function.

  • 1
    Vector operator+(const Vector& p1, Vector& p2) should be declare out of class – Garf365 Mar 11 '16 at 15:06
  • 1
    as a member function it has this implicitly as first parameter, but you want to supply two more – formerlyknownas_463035818 Mar 11 '16 at 15:06
13

When operator+ is defined inside class, left operand of operator is current instance. So, to declare a overload of operator+ you have 2 choices

  • inside class, with only one parameter which is right operand
  • outside of class, with two parameters, left and right operands.

Choice 1: outside class

class Vector
{
private:
    double i;
    double j;
    double k;
public:
    Vector(double _i, double _j, double _k)
    {
        i = _i;
        j = _j;
        k = _k;
    }

    Vector& operator+=(const Vector& p1)
    {
        i += p1.i;
        j += p1.j;
        k += p1.k;
        return *this;
    }

    //Some other functionality...


};

Vector operator+(const Vector& p1, const Vector& p2)
{
    Vector temp(p1);
    temp += p2;
    return temp;
}

Choice 2: inside class

class Vector
{
private:
    double i;
    double j;
    double k;
public:
    Vector(double _i, double _j, double _k)
    {
        i = _i;
        j = _j;
        k = _k;
    }

    Vector& operator+=(const Vector& p1)
    {
        i += p1.i;
        j += p1.j;
        k += p1.k;
        return *this;
    }



    Vector operator+(consr Vector & p2)
    {
        Vector temp(*this);
        temp += p2;
        return temp;
    }

};

You can see how should be declared operators here : C/C++ operators

1

one more possibility is by using the friend keyword.

friend Vector operator+(const Number& n1, const Number& n2)
    {
        Vector temp(n1);
        temp+=n2;
        return temp;
    }
  • This doesn't answer question. It is not a question about friendness here. Also, your declaration of friendness isn't correct => declare as friend inside class, using friend keyword followed by only declaration and write implementation of function outside of class, without friend keyword. And finally, IMHO, use friend only when it is needed, and here, it doesn't – Garf365 Nov 14 '18 at 10:14

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