3

Basically, I want to check if the square root of a number is an integer, so I tried the following function:

is.integer(sqrt(4))

The expected value is TRUE whereas the actual result is FALSE. I have read some other posts and it seems I need to use L to force into an integer. However, not sure how should I make it work in my case.

7

Yes. Even:

is.integer(1)
## [1] FALSE

because the type (opposed to the value) is not integer. Look at the help ?is.integer. A function is.wholenumber is shown there:

is.wholenumber <-
     function(x, tol = .Machine$double.eps^0.5)  
         abs(x - round(x)) < tol
is.wholenumber(sqrt(4))
## [1] TRUE
  • 1
    Curious as to why you're using √.Machine$double.eps rather than using the epsilon value directly. – psaxton Mar 12 '16 at 2:11
  • Looks like a somewhat heuristic choice (evidenced by having tol as an optional argument; if they were very sure about the value of tol it would not be a argument) – Erwin Kalvelagen Mar 12 '16 at 3:04
  • I saw that it was just a tol default and would have outright called it wrong if you were taking the root of tol in the method body. The machine default epsilon should generally be less than 1 and taking the root will make it larger causing the default method to be less accurate than configured. Also, if I set the default I'm potentially given a different result than if I pass the same value as a parameter. I realize this isn't code review, but I can't help myself sometimes. – psaxton Mar 12 '16 at 3:15
  • @ErwinKalvelagen Thank you for the solution. However, I'm having trouble to understand your code. What is .Machine$double.eps? – Cypress Mar 12 '16 at 4:41
  • 1
    @psaxton: " if I set the default I'm potentially given a different result than if I pass the same value as a parameter". Really? Can you give a reproducible example of that? I'm skeptical/surprised ... – Ben Bolker Mar 13 '16 at 17:38

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