6

I must understand something about this. It seems like there is no good guide to explain explicitly. What does the function tree look like?

static long Fib(int n)
{  
    if (n <= 2)  
    {   
        return 1;  
    }  
    return Fib(n - 1) + Fib(n - 2); 
}

Assuming I do Fib(7), I actually understand that it should look like this:

The thing is that it seems like the tree is presented as if fib(7) actually means fib(6) + fib(5) which should be true.... However, if I understand recursion than fib(7) is actually fib(6) + fib(5) but fib(5) isn't operated yet since fib(6) will now call itself to fib(4) + fib(3) and once again fib(3) won't be executed since fib(4) will call itself until it stops at the "stop" condition... and than what?

If fib(7) calls fib(6) and so on..... until fib(1), what about all of the other fib(n-2) functions?

How does it actually returns each time the result and tell me what is the value of fib(7)?

3
  • Just think of each invocation as a separate instance of the method. Fib (with parameter 7) creates another instance of Fib (with parameter 6), then waits for it to return a value. Then it creates another instance of Fib (with parameter 5), then waits for it to return a value. Then it adds up the 2 values.
    – Dennis_E
    Mar 12, 2016 at 15:01
  • it is done with help of stack. every method you call will be stored in stack with all needed information to do all job and continue the work. so when you call f(6) it will be added at top of the stack while f(7) is under f(6). after finishing f(6) it will remove f(6) from stack and now you can continue in f(7) because you had all the needed information stored in stack to continue... Mar 12, 2016 at 15:15
  • 1
    Side note: this is a very inefficient way of calculating a Fibonacci number. (exponential time)
    – Dennis_E
    Mar 12, 2016 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

4

It doesn't return a value each time, at least not immediately.

Every time the method calls itself, it places the new call on a stack. There's limited space on this stack, so a big number with enough recursive calls will throw a stackoverflow exception. That's also why you have this terminating condition, that tells it when to stop calling itself.

if (n <= 2)  
{   
    return 1;  
}

After your method calls itself for the very last time on each branch of the tree (when n <= 2 and the method returns 1 instead of calling itself), it will unwind the stack, finally evaluating all of those calls and summing up the return values, returning 13 in the case of Fib(7).

0

well recusion is not easy to understand until you have understood it ...

so the function fib(7) is calculated with fib(6) + fib(5)

(the same function is called with smaller values which leads to a function call within a function call within a function call)

fib(6) again is fib(5) + fib(4)
and fib(5) is fib(4) + fib(3)

this chain continues until you reach fib(3) = fib(2) + fib(1) because fib(1) and fib(2) are 1. This means that fib(3) has the value 2

now you can go another step back and look at fib(4) which is fib(3) + fib(2) which calculates to 2 + 1 which is 3

and at this stage we are back at fib(5) which is fib(4) + fib(3) or 3 + 2 or 5

and in this style you follow the tree back up until you reach fib(7) again which then calculates to 5 + 8 or 13 which is the correct value of the seventh number of the Fibbonacci row

the stop condition is there to stop calling further functions and to start to return actual values back to the functions that called the function.

I hope this helps a bit.

0

Let me explain it for 4

  //step- 1) you are passing 4
    static long Fib(4)
    {  //4>2
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(3)//This will call Fib(3) 
+ Fib(2); 
    }
    //step-2
    your n is 3 now
    static long Fib(3)
    {  //3>2
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(2)//This will call Fib(2) 
+ Fib(1); 
    }
    //step-3
    //your n is 2 now
    static long Fib(2)
    {  //2=2
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   //here it will return 1 back to step-2
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(n - 1) + Fib(n - 2); 
    }
    //step-4
    static long Fib(3)
    {  
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(2) 1//we got from step-3 
+ Fib(1)//will call Fib(1) ; 
    }
    //step-5
    //your n is 1
    static long Fib(1)
    {  //1<2
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   //it will return 1 back to step-4
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(n - 1) + Fib(n - 2); 
    }
    //step-6
    static long Fib(3)
    {  
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(2)//-> 1//we got from step-3
 + Fib(1)//->1//we got from step-5 ; 
    //(1+1)=2 will be return back to step-1
    }
    //step-7
    static long Fib(4)
    {  
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(3)//->2//we got it from step-6+ Fib(2)//will call Fib(2); 
    }
    //step-8
    static long Fib(2)
    {  //2=2
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   //This will return back to step-7
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(n - 1) + Fib(n - 2); 
    }
    //step-9
    static long Fib(4)
    {  
        if (n <= 2)  
        {   
            return 1;  
        }  
        return Fib(3)//->2 we already got it from step-6 + Fib(2)//->1// we got it from step-8; 
    //This will return 3(2+1)
    }

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