142

I am using TypeScript in my application, where I use function:

Object.assign(this.success, success.json())

However, during compilation, I receive the following error:

 error TS2339: Property 'assign' does not exist on type 'ObjectConstructor'.

Do you have any idea how can I get rid of this error?

1
  • 1
    please consider changing the accepted answer - much better answers with more upvotes have been posted since then. Nov 27, 2019 at 10:27

7 Answers 7

196

Configure:

If you're using VS code (or if you see a tsconfig.json file):

You should add the lib property to your tsconfig.json and then your editor will use the bundled typescript type definitions and also give you intellisense.

Just add the "lib": ["esnext", "dom"] to your tsconfig.json and restart VS Code

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        // ...
        "target": "es5",
        "lib": ["esnext", "dom"]
        // ...
    }
}

See all tsconfig.json options here.

If you're using Visual Studio or MSBuild include this tag:

<TypeScriptLib>esnext, dom</TypeScriptLib>

See all MSBuild typescript compiler options and usage here.


Check your work:

If you've configured your project to use the built-in types and restarted your editor, then your resulting type will look like this instead of the type being any when you use Object.assign:

code example 1


Note on polyfills and older browser compatibility:

Note that if you are transpiling to ES5 or lower and are targeting IE11, you will need to include polyfills because the typescript compiler will not include the polyfills for you.

If you'd like to include the polyfills (which you should) then I would recommend using core-js's polyfills.

npm install --save core-js

or

yarn add core-js

Then in the entry point in your app (e.g. /src/index.ts) add the import for core-js at the top of the file:

import 'core-js';

If you're not using a package manager then you can just paste the following polyfill taken from MDN in some place in your code that runs before the your usage of Object.assign.

if (typeof Object.assign != 'function') {
  // Must be writable: true, enumerable: false, configurable: true
  Object.defineProperty(Object, "assign", {
    value: function assign(target, varArgs) { // .length of function is 2
      'use strict';
      if (target == null) { // TypeError if undefined or null
        throw new TypeError('Cannot convert undefined or null to object');
      }

      var to = Object(target);

      for (var index = 1; index < arguments.length; index++) {
        var nextSource = arguments[index];

        if (nextSource != null) { // Skip over if undefined or null
          for (var nextKey in nextSource) {
            // Avoid bugs when hasOwnProperty is shadowed
            if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(nextSource, nextKey)) {
              to[nextKey] = nextSource[nextKey];
            }
          }
        }
      }
      return to;
    },
    writable: true,
    configurable: true
  });
}
9
  • 4
    I tried "lib":["es2015","es2017","dom"] but I still get Property 'values' does not exist on type 'ObjectConstructor'., I guess its not in the spec
    – Nikos
    Apr 14, 2017 at 11:16
  • 1
    @Nikos did you restart vs code? Object.values is in the spec. and typescript has typings for it. Apr 14, 2017 at 13:54
  • If by any chance WebStorm gives you an error, you need to install the Javascript.next plugin here : plugins.jetbrains.com/plugin/…
    – user390749
    Oct 11, 2017 at 19:18
  • Modifying tsconfig.json is the only workaround that works for me. i.e adding "lib": [ "es2015", "es2017", "dom" ] Mar 28, 2018 at 12:55
  • 2
    @AQuirky The TypeScriptTarget option changes the target version of EmcaScript (~the formal javascript name). FYI: ES2015 is not compatible for IE11 (in case you have to support it). You can still set TypeScriptTarget to ES5 while also setting TypeScriptLib to DOM, ES2015 to achieve the same fix while also remaining compatible with IE11 (but if you don't have to support IE, then just set TypeScriptTarget to ES2015). Sep 8, 2018 at 16:21
144

You can use type assertion, like this:

(<any>Object).assign(this.success, success.json())
6
  • 32
    Wow, seems super hacky.. Could you explain what does (<any>Object) do ?
    – uksz
    Mar 12, 2016 at 16:32
  • Alright, I see that I am declaring that Object has type any.
    – uksz
    Mar 12, 2016 at 16:42
  • 35
    Although this seems like a solution, it really should not be treated as one. Rather then simply add ambiguity and hide transpiler errors (which this does), it is far better to actually fix them and get useful feedback from the console. Nov 21, 2017 at 16:40
  • 7
    This is just casting and hiding the problem. You need to potentially use polyfills in specific browsers, etc. This will result in errors running in some browsers Mar 19, 2018 at 16:38
  • 4
    I would advice anyone looking here to scroll down a bit further where it explains what to add to your tsconfig which is a better solution than this one.
    – mesqueeb
    Feb 23, 2019 at 8:01
136

This is caused by you using an ECMAScript 6 feature and targeting ECMAScript 5 or 3. Easiest fix is to set the right target, for example if you are using Grunt:

options: {
    target: 'es6'
}

of change the relevant property tab in Visual Studio, or manually by editing your .csproj file and finding the TypeScriptTarget element and changing to ES6, for example:

<TypeScriptTarget>ES6</TypeScriptTarget>

If you need to target ES5, then merely add the following to your TypeScript code

declare interface ObjectConstructor {
    assign(target: any, ...sources: any[]): any;
}

That merges the extra method in, solving the issue. More details here. You may need a polyfill though, depending on your browser compatibility requirements - for example this one from MDN:

if (typeof Object.assign != 'function') {
  (function () {
    Object.assign = function (target) {
      'use strict';
      if (target === undefined || target === null) {
        throw new TypeError('Cannot convert undefined or null to object');
      }

      var output = Object(target);
      for (var index = 1; index < arguments.length; index++) {
        var source = arguments[index];
        if (source !== undefined && source !== null) {
          for (var nextKey in source) {
            if (source.hasOwnProperty(nextKey)) {
              output[nextKey] = source[nextKey];
            }
          }
        }
      }
      return output;
    };
  })();
}
5
  • 5
    @JoeKeene This answer doesn't solve the problem in the best way as for TS 2.0+. If you're targeting ES5 then you should use the --lib es2015 compiler option. My issue with the approach above is that if you declare the Object.assign function instead of using the built-in declaration then you won't get proper typing and documentation. They added the --lib option so you don't have to re-declare interfaces that are already part of the standard. Feb 2, 2017 at 17:43
  • For this to work I had to add the interface declaration to a typings (.d.ts) file, rather than a typescript (.ts) file. Mar 7, 2017 at 22:48
  • @uksz Perhaps as this is not hacky, it should be accepted?
    – Jason
    Aug 24, 2017 at 15:50
  • I changed "target": "es5", to "target": "es6", in tsconfig.json. and it worked (y) Jun 11, 2018 at 15:21
  • 1
    For Object.values, it must be "target": "es2017", since this is the top search result for the same error code. Jul 6, 2018 at 17:30
3

You can use spread operator as in ES6

const obj = {...this.success,...success.json()};

1

I've added typings:

typings install dt~es6-shim --global --save
1
  • 1
    Looks like same typings what i've replied? Or i'm missing something ?
    – Sergejs
    Mar 14, 2017 at 9:04
1

Why not use the spread operator?

return {this.success, ...success.json() || {}};

1
  • Definitely preferable to use spread but can't in some of the scenarios Object.assign covers as the latter accepts an arbitrary number of objects. return Object.assign({}, ...arrayOfObjects);. Sep 25, 2020 at 15:02
0

I faced this issue when testing a React application with Jest using @testing-library/react. The fix for me was to add the following to my setupTests.ts:

declare global {
    interface Object {
        /**
         * Returns an array of values of the enumerable properties of an object
         * @param o Object that contains the properties and methods. This can be an object that you created or an existing Document Object Model (DOM) object.
         */
        values<T>(o: { [s: string]: T } | ArrayLike<T>): T[];

        /**
         * Returns an array of values of the enumerable properties of an object
         * @param o Object that contains the properties and methods. This can be an object that you created or an existing Document Object Model (DOM) object.
         */
        values(o: {}): any[];

        /**
         * Returns an array of key/values of the enumerable properties of an object
         * @param o Object that contains the properties and methods. This can be an object that you created or an existing Document Object Model (DOM) object.
         */
        entries<T>(o: { [s: string]: T } | ArrayLike<T>): [string, T][];

        /**
         * Returns an array of key/values of the enumerable properties of an object
         * @param o Object that contains the properties and methods. This can be an object that you created or an existing Document Object Model (DOM) object.
         */
        entries(o: {}): [string, any][];
    }
}

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