8

What is side-cast/cross-cast in Dynamic_cast in C++. Can someone explain with an example?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
    virtual void fn(){} 
};
class B:public A
{

};
class C:public A
{

};
int main() {

    B b;
    C* c;

    {
        c = dynamic_cast<C*> (&b);  
    }
    if(!c)
    {
        cout<<"invalid cast "<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

It prints invalid cast. So, what is side-cast?

4
  • Where did you get the term side-cast? I believe it is equivalent to cross-cast, but the standard doesn't use the term side-cast or cross-cast. It only refers to 'most derived type' for example.
    – wally
    Mar 12, 2016 at 16:16
  • cross-cast is used in book bjarne stroustroup Dec 3, 2016 at 0:16
  • 1
    In The C++ Programming Language, Fourth Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup It does use the term crosscast (not cross-cast). I could not find the term side-cast. Maybe you could expand your question to explain where you found the term?
    – wally
    Dec 3, 2016 at 10:20
  • 2
    @wally I think the side cast is from en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/dynamic_cast
    – Tmx
    Sep 5, 2019 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

23

The terms are pretty much explained in the comments, so I'm bundling that in my answer. But I think it is important to provide source code that shows the behavior of the code, since that provided by the asker only regards whether the crosscast compiles.

Assuming this inheritance tree (the dreaded diamond):

        BaseClass
       /         \
      V           V
   Left          Right
       \        /
        V      V
       MostDerived

Crosscast

A crosscast or sidecast is when dynamic_cast<Left*>(pRight) returns a Left* that properly behaves as a Left*. This happens when pRight points to a MostDerived object. Crosscasts only work with dynamic_cast, not reinterpret_cast or static_cast.

Downcasting and Upcasting

Downcast is casting from a Right* to a MostDerived*, which may fail. When it could fail, this should be done with a dynamic_cast, which sets the result to nullptr to signal failure. A common pattern is to have a dynamic_cast in debug, but to use a faster static_cast in the corresponding release code, as in:

#ifdef NDEBUG
return static_cast<MostDerived*>(input);
#else
auto p = dynamic_cast<MostDerived*>(input);
assert(p != nullptr && "Unable to cast input to MostDerived*");
return p; 
#endif

Upcasting is done implicitly when you pass a MostDerived* where any of the base classes is expected. This succeeds because MostDerived* is always a Right*, Left* and BaseClass*. However, because of the dreaded diamond, casting a MostDerived* to BaseClass* directly is ambiguous and results in a compiler error.

So, in order to get a BaseClass* from a MostDerived*, we must first cast to Left* or Right* through an implicit upcast. The resulting Left* or Right* can be cast to the other side with a crosscast by using dynamic_cast. If using static_cast, the behaviour of the resulting pointer is incorrect when casting to Right*. This is due to the order that they are specified in MostDerived. This is because static cast does not change the pointer address, and therefore does not use the new vtable to resolve function calls.

For this behaviour, it does not matter whether virtual inheritance is specified.

The term crosscast is used in The C++ Programming Language, Fourth Edition by Bjarne Stroustrup, while sidecast is mentioned in point 5b of cppreference's explanation on dynamic_cast.

#include <iostream>

struct BaseClass { virtual const char * behave() = 0; };
struct Left : BaseClass { virtual const char * behave() { return "Left"; } };
struct Right : BaseClass { virtual const char * behave() { return "Right"; } };
struct MostDerived : Left, Right { };

int main()
{
    MostDerived * mostDerived = new MostDerived();
    // implicit upcast through the diamond results in a compile-time error, ambiguous:
    // BaseClass * baseClass = mostDerived;
    Left * left = mostDerived;
    BaseClass * baseClassThroughLeft = left; // or, equivalently:
    // BaseClass * baseClassThroughLeft = reinterpret_cast<Left*>(mostDerived);
    Right * right = mostDerived;
    BaseClass * baseClassThroughRight = right;
    
    // this is of course ambiguous and does not compile
    //std::cout << mostDerived->behave() << std::endl;
    
    // note, only the right has a pointer value of 8 more
    // the two BaseClass pointers point to the same as left,
    // as does mostDerived
    std::cout << "left:  " << left << std::endl << "right: " << right << std::endl 
              << mostDerived << std::endl << baseClassThroughRight << std::endl 
              << baseClassThroughLeft << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Cast Left BaseClass * expression to Right *" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "with static_cast, behaves as " 
              << static_cast<Right *>(baseClassThroughLeft)->behave() 
              << " at addr: " << static_cast<Right *>(baseClassThroughLeft) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "with dynamic_cast, behaves as "
              << dynamic_cast<Right *>(baseClassThroughLeft)->behave() 
              << " at addr: " << dynamic_cast<Right *>(baseClassThroughLeft) << std::endl;
              
    std::cout << "Cast Right BaseClass * expression to Left *" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "with static_cast, behaves as " 
              << static_cast<Left *>(baseClassThroughRight)->behave() 
              << " at addr: " << static_cast<Left *>(baseClassThroughRight) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "with dynamic_cast, behaves as "
              << dynamic_cast<Left *>(baseClassThroughRight)->behave() 
              << " at addr: " << dynamic_cast<Left *>(baseClassThroughRight) << std::endl;

    delete mostDerived;
    return 0;
}

The output of the program is:

left:  0xeffeb0
right: 0xeffeb8
0xeffeb0
0xeffeb8
0xeffeb0
Cast Left BaseClass * expression to Right *
with static_cast, behaves as Left at addr: 0xeffeb0
with dynamic_cast, behaves as Right at addr: 0xeffeb8
Cast Right BaseClass * expression to Left *
with static_cast, behaves as Right at addr: 0xeffeb8
with dynamic_cast, behaves as Left at addr: 0xeffeb0
4
  • 1
    Is this a typo?: BaseClass * baseClassThroughRight = left; Feb 18, 2021 at 23:26
  • 1
    This code does not show the dreaded diamond, but maybe a dreaded bull, as Left and Right don't virtually inherit from BaseClass, so both have their own copy of 'BaseClass'. Adding virtual inheritance (struct Left : virtual BaseClass; struct Right : virtual BaseClass), and providing MostDerived::behave enables BaseClass * baseClass = mostDerived; and mostDerived->behave() to compile. Although, this dreaded bull nicely shows the cross-cast doesn't need a shared virtual base class to work. Feb 18, 2021 at 23:52
  • well spotted, @CharlesLWilcox, that was indeed a typo. You are correct that virtual inheritance solves the dreaded diamond, and I note that the compiler then enforces you to provide MostDerived::behave explicitly. Since there's never any ambiguity in that case, I don't see how that could still be called the 'dreaded diamond'. Feb 22, 2021 at 15:44
  • 1
    Why do you depict it as a diamond hierarchy? As far as I tested sidecast works equally fine in a normal "V-shape" multi-inheritance (no common base class). Doesn't it?
    – bloody
    Dec 27, 2022 at 17:37
1

I think this is a better answer for my question, not sure

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
    public:
virtual ~A(){}  
};
class B: virtual public A
{

};
class C:virtual public A
{
};

class D:public B,public C
{

};
int main() {
    // your code goes here
    D d;
    C*c= &d;
    //B*b = static_cast<B*>(c);//--cross cast using static cast gives compiler error
    D*dd = dynamic_cast<D*>(c);
    B*b = dynamic_cast<B*>(c);//--cross cast using dynamic cast succeeds
    return 0;
}
6
  • 1
    If you're going to answer your own question then it might be helpful to answer where the term side-cast came from.
    – wally
    Dec 3, 2016 at 10:17
  • I read it somewhere(side cast), I dont know where, but is my observation about cross-cast right? Dec 3, 2016 at 13:28
  • I read it somewhere in net (side cast), I dont know where, but is my observation about cross-cast right?both side cast and cross cast means the same as per my understanding. Dec 3, 2016 at 13:47
  • Looks ok. But the question asks So, what is side-cast?. I don't know if they are the same. Probably, but without a reference, who knows? It doesn't seem like you've answered your own question. I think part of the answer is that nobody really uses the term. The other part of the question was what is cross-cast?; which is also not answered. It seems you only wanted an example, but that is not what was written in the question.
    – wally
    Dec 3, 2016 at 13:57
  • sidecast is there on cppreference. point 5.b in the explanation en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/dynamic_cast Nov 16, 2017 at 8:42

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