1

I would like to update a child context when it's parent context has been updated.

I have an NSFetchedResultsController using a child context that I then would like to update the UI through it's delegate - I'm not sure if this is totally a correct pattern, here's what I'm doing now:

I create a child context that gets updated from a web service in a class that supports my model. This is a simplified example:

class Messages {

var pmoc: NSManagedObjectContext!
var delegate: MessagesDelegate?

init() {

    let appDel  = UIApplication.sharedApplication().delegate as! AppDelegate
    let moc     = appDel.managedObjectContext

    let pmoc = NSManagedObjectContext(concurrencyType: .PrivateQueueConcurrencyType)
    pmoc.parentContext = moc
    self.pmoc = pmoc
}

func dataToUpdatePrivateContextReceived() {

    // Add things to the private moc
    self.pmoc.performBlock { () -> Void in

        // Create new NSManagedOBject, etc.
        self.savePMOC()
    }
}

func savePMOC() {

    self.pmoc.performBlock { () -> Void in

        do {

            try self.pmoc.save()
            // save main context through an abstraction...
            // Inform any delegate a save has taken place
            self.delegate?.pmocSavedIntoMain()

        } catch let error as NSError {

            print("Save pmoc error :\(error.localizedDescription)")
        }
    }
}
}

protocol MessagesDelegate {
    func pmocSavedIntoMain()
}

Then in some UIViewController I use an NSFetchedResultsController to update a UITableView, I'm trying to use this controller with it's own private context so it's updating doesn't block the UI. Another simplified example:

class ViewController: UIViewController {

var fetchedResultsController: NSFetchedResultsController!
var viewPMOC: NSManagedObjectContext!
let messages = Messages()

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    messages.delegate = self

    let appDel  = UIApplication.sharedApplication().delegate as! AppDelegate
    let moc     = appDel.managedObjectContext

    let pmoc = NSManagedObjectContext(concurrencyType: .PrivateQueueConcurrencyType)
    pmoc.parentContext = moc
    self.viewPMOC = pmoc

    let fr = NSFetchRequest(entityName: "MyEntity")
    fr.fetchBatchSize = 20

    let sort = NSSortDescriptor(key: "id", ascending: false)
    fr.sortDescriptors = [sort]

    self.fetchedResultsController = NSFetchedResultsController(fetchRequest: fr,
        managedObjectContext: self.viewPMOC,
        sectionNameKeyPath: nil,
        cacheName: nil)

    self.fetchedResultsController.delegate = self

    do {

        try self.fetchedResultsController.performFetch()

    } catch let error as NSError {

        print("vdl fetch error is: \(error.localizedDescription)")
    }
}
}

extension ViewController: NSFetchedResultsControllerDelegate {

func controllerWillChangeContent(controller: NSFetchedResultsController) {
    // dispatch begin updates on maind thread
}

func controller(controller: NSFetchedResultsController, didChangeObject anObject: AnyObject, atIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath?, forChangeType type: NSFetchedResultsChangeType, newIndexPath: NSIndexPath?) {
    // handle update type on main thread
}

func controllerDidChangeContent(controller: NSFetchedResultsController) {
    // dispatch end upds on main thread
}
}

extension ViewController: MessagesDelegate {
func pmocSavedIntoMain() {
    // what can I do here to get the child context to update from
    //parent and thus trigger the fetched results controller to update the view?
}
}

2 Answers 2

2

Fetched results controller needs a main context.

Use this pattern to get rid of the "choppiness".

RootContext (private queue) - saves to persistent store
MainContext (main queue) child of RootContext - use for UI (FRC)
WorkerContext (private queue) - child of MainContext - use for updates & inserts

The your web query is finished, create a worker context and update the data model. When you save, the changes will be pushed up to the main context and your UI should update via the FRC delegate. Save the main and root context to persist.

Make sure you are using the block methods performBlock and performBlockAndWait throughout when dealing with child contexts.

3
  • ah ha! I've never thought to do it this way but seeing it like this makes so much sense. I will update my project soon, thank you!
    – Fred Faust
    Mar 13, 2016 at 14:12
  • What about getting objects from database? Which context is the best to use? Aug 8, 2017 at 6:28
  • @PabloMartinez FRC should take care of this in terms of performance, so you do not need a background thrad for fetching.
    – Mundi
    Aug 8, 2017 at 19:33
0

I'm trying to use this controller with it's own private context so it's updating doesn't block the UI

The FRC's job in life is to update the UI though - this one should be on the main thread, versus as you mention, a private context who loads data. I'd put the FRC back on your main context (which will then be automatically updated when you save your child context on up), and leave it there unless you have performance problems. Then you could look at more exotic things, but FRC is aimed at keeping performance high through things such as its batchSize.

2
  • When I have a lot of updates and call insertRow it gets pretty choppy, this seems to start to alleviate a decent part of that. I'm just missing when updates get saved back into the main context after it exists.
    – Fred Faust
    Mar 12, 2016 at 20:33
  • 1
    Take a look at the implementation in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/31722142/…
    – sschale
    Mar 12, 2016 at 21:04

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