-1

Can someone show me an example of where this syntax would show up in code?

thing.Foo().Bar(this)

From the looks of it, I see an object that calls a function that calls another function?

I obviously don't know how it works. If you have the slightest idea, I would appreciate a suggestion. Thanks!

2

This is one of many possible scenarios:

struct somethingelse
{
    void SomeOtherMethod()
    {
        thing.Foo().Bar(this);
    }
};

struct foo 
{
    void Bar(somethingelse *pSomethingElse);
};

struct thing
{
    foo &Foo() {return m_foo;}

    foo m_foo;
};

What makes this a bit unusual is that the naming convention for the class and method naming is the opposite of the de-facto one in which classes are capitalised and methods camel-cased.

1
  • Interesting approach. Thank you for your contribution.
    – adabo
    Mar 12 '16 at 19:39
1

This code could be found in any non-static member function of a class. The Foo() function of thing returns an object of a class with a member function Bar that takes a pointer to the current object (this) as argument.

5
  • By the way, your answer made perfect sense to me. Thank you!
    – adabo
    Mar 12 '16 at 19:38
  • Do you really intend to return a copy of the ClassA object in ClassB::Foo()? - if so, this that's fine.
    – marko
    Mar 12 '16 at 19:41
  • @marko That's a good question. I neglected to make ClassC inherit from ClassA. This way ClassA will be passed a pointer to an instance of ClassC. It's quite confusing, but it's something I would like to experiment with. I believe it will be the key to a project I'm working on.
    – adabo
    Mar 12 '16 at 20:00
  • The rookie mistake everyone makes when starting out with OO programming is to overuse Inheritance. You're often better off with composition.
    – marko
    Mar 12 '16 at 20:06
  • Care to elaborate? I'm actually trying to limit inheritance. How does composition help here?
    – adabo
    Mar 12 '16 at 22:59

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