8

The below code works as a simple test page that uses Google sign in:

<html lang="en">
  <head>

    <script type="text/javascript">

        function onGapiLoaded() {
            auth = gapi.auth2.init({
                client_id: "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_ID",
                scope: "profile email"

            });

            console.log( "signed in: " + auth.isSignedIn.get() );

            auth.isSignedIn.listen( function(signedIn){ console.log( "signedin: " + signedIn ) } );

            gapi.signin2.render( "signInButton", {
                'width': 230,
                'height': 50,
                'longtitle': true,
                'theme': 'dark',
                'onsuccess': onSignIn
            } );
        }

          function onSignIn(googleUser) {
            // Useful data for your client-side scripts:
            var profile = googleUser.getBasicProfile();
            console.log("Name: " + profile.getName());
          };


    </script>

    <script src="https://apis.google.com/js/platform.js?onload=onGapiLoaded" async defer></script>

  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="signInButton" class="g-signin2"></div>
  </body>
</html>

However if I remove the class="g-signin2" from the signin button, or remove the button completely not only does the button disappear but the whole sign in library stops working - I get an uncaught exception:

Cannot read property 'init' of undefined

when I try to call gapi.auth2.init and the user is not logged in. It seems that the auth library relies on a button being present in the dom to initialise.

I am planning to incorporate this in my Angular app that will initialise the auth lib in a service before any button appears on the stage. If the user is logged in already no login button will appear. Based on the behaviour here I will not be able to use this lib without having a button in the DOM which seems rather constricting.

2 Answers 2

13

In order to use .auth2 namespace, you need to load it first. Incorporate it and juggle some bit, here's my recommended code.

<html lang="en">
  <head>
    <script src="https://apis.google.com/js/api.js"></script>    
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function onSignIn(googleUser) {
            console.log( "signedin");
            // Useful data for your client-side scripts:
            var profile = googleUser.getBasicProfile();
            console.log("Name: " + profile.getName());
        };

        gapi.load('auth2', function() {
            gapi.auth2.init({
                client_id: "REPLACE_WITH_YOUR_ID",
                scope: "profile email" // this isn't required
            }).then(function(auth2) {
                console.log( "signed in: " + auth2.isSignedIn.get() );  
                auth2.isSignedIn.listen(onSignIn);
                var button = document.querySelector('#signInButton');
                button.addEventListener('click', function() {
                  auth2.signIn();
                });
            });
        });
    </script>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="signInButton"><img src="IMAGE_FILE" /></div>
  </body>
</html>

There are a few things to note:

  • load api.js instead of platform.js
  • button assets are not loaded automatically, bring yours
  • if you want to take advantage of widgets, you have to use platform.js and .signin2 namespace but that is another approach I won't talk about here.
0
0

Don't take out the class="g-signin2", instead, add style="display:none;" to it and on your function onSignIn, hide the button if it is visible, add an 'onfailure': onFailedSignIn to gapi.signin2.render with the new function onFailedSignIn, which shows the button if it's hidden.

That way, you don't break any default functionality that Google has hidden, but still get the functionality of hiding the button when the user is authenticated, and showing it when they're not.

2
  • Thanks for the reply but that still requires that I have the button in my html file. In my app (and most angular or large apps I would assume) I would not have the button listed in the main html file I'd have it in login.html or header.html that only gets loaded and displayed if and when needed. The lib seems to be putting constraints on app design that I don't really want.
    – Roaders
    Mar 14, 2016 at 9:42
  • Not really. If you need that kind of functionality, and don't want the work-around I gave, I suggest you work with the Google API directly and not waste time with their cut-and-paste solutions that should fit most people. Having the button in the HTML doesn't even add 1kb to the overall payload, so not really sure why you're concerned by it?
    – zerohero
    Mar 14, 2016 at 10:05

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