2

I've got a line separated by commas which I need to split into 4 separate variables.

i.e. a line like val1, val2, val3, val4 would result in the following 4 variables:

var1 = val1
var2 = val2
var3 = val3
var4 = val4

Now I can easily get this by using something like this:

($var1, $var2, $var3, $var4) = (split /,/, $inputLine);

However, if the inputline contains less than 4 values, the remaining variables should contain the last available value.

I.e. if the inputline is val1, val2, then the variables should be set like this:

var1 = val1
var2 = val2
var3 = val2
var4 = val2

What would be an elegant way to approach this?

4

//= is the "defined or" operator.

$var2 //= $var1;
$var3 //= $var2;
$var4 //= $var3;

As said in the linked post, if you use a version prior to 5.10, the equivalent is :

$var2 = defined($var2) ? $var2 : $var1;
$var3 = defined($var3) ? $var3 : $var2;
$var4 = defined($var4) ? $var4 : $var3;

Some strings are falsey values :

$str = '';
if ($str) {
    print "true\n";
} else {
    print "false\n";
}
# prints 'false'

$str = '0';
if ($str) {
    print "true\n";
} else {
    print "false\n";
}
# prints 'false'

If '' or '0' are "invalid" values in your porgram, you can use the ||= operator.
If only undef shoud be overwritten, use one of the two versions above.

$var2 ||= $var1; # $var2 will be overriden if $var2 is undef or '' or '0'
$var3 ||= $var2; # $var3 will be overriden if $var3 is undef or '' or '0'
$var4 ||= $var3; # $var4 will be overriden if $var4 is undef or '' or '0'
  • Thanks for the answer, unfortunately this doesn't seem to be working with the version of perl I'm running here: Can't modify division (/) in division (/) – Subbeh Mar 14 '16 at 9:58
  • I changed //= with ||= and it seems to be working now – Subbeh Mar 14 '16 at 10:12
  • // is for newer versions of perl. 5.14+ if I recall correctly. || works almost the same - it just handles empty string '' and 0 differently. – Sobrique Mar 14 '16 at 10:28
  • 2
    Changing //= to ||= will not work if 0 or '' are valid values in your data. – Dave Cross Mar 14 '16 at 10:38
  • 1
    @Sobrique It's 5.10+. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Mar 14 '16 at 12:28
1

It takes a preparatory step and an extra variable and then it's a one-line loop.

# my (@in, $tmp) = ($var1, $var2, $var3, $var4); # If it was split
my (@in, $tmp) = (split /,/, $inputLine);

for ($var1, $var2, $var3, $var4) {
    $tmp = $_ = shift @in || $tmp;
}

The bad: $tmp stays around.


Update As explained in LeGEC solution, in order to keep the data that evaluates to false but may be legitimate in the application ('' and 0) the loop-line above should be changed to

With v5.10 or later

$tmp = $_ = shift @in // $tmp

For earlier versions

$tmp = $_ = (@in ? shift @in : $tmp)

If data surely cannot be '' or 0, or if these indeed need be replaced, only then may || stay.

  • Thanks, nice solution as well – Subbeh Mar 14 '16 at 11:48

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