43

For example:

if (true) try
{
    // works as expected with both true and false, but is it legal?
}
catch (...)
{
    // ...
}

In other words, is it legal to put the try-block right after the if condition?

8
  • Yes [it's illegal]. The try block should be within the if statement. But why not just test the condition using try?
    – franklin
    Mar 14, 2016 at 10:56
  • 58
    @franklin No, it is not illegal.
    – Columbo
    Mar 14, 2016 at 11:01
  • 5
    Correct, it's not illegal. The brackets for the true-clause are optional in C and C++, and it's assumed whatever follows the if() is the true clause, and that a catch-clause that follows a try-clause is associated with that try-clause. Lots of companies' style guides will still gig you for not using the brackets, though. Mar 14, 2016 at 16:45
  • 3
    int main() try {} catch(...){} is also legal.
    – nwp
    Mar 14, 2016 at 23:55
  • @nwp: That is amazing! It looks like it's a new "feature" in C++0x. The motivation seems to be to allow constructor-initializers to be covered by the try/catch (e.g. class foo { int bar; foo() try : bar(3) { ... } catch ...).
    – ruakh
    Mar 15, 2016 at 0:55

4 Answers 4

77

The syntax of a try block (which is a statement in C++) is

try compound-statement handler-sequence

And the syntax of if is:

attr(optional) if ( condition ) statement_true      
attr(optional) if ( condition ) statement_true else statement_false     

where:

statement-true - any statement (often a compound statement), which is executed if condition evaluates to true
statement-false - any statement (often a compound statement), which is executed if condition evaluates to false

So yes, your code is legal code in C++.

statement_true in your case is a try block.

In legality, it is similar to:

if (condition) for(...) {
    ...
}

But your code is not very readable and can be the victim of some C++ pitfalls when an else is added. So, it is advisable to add explicit {...} after if in your case.

15
  • 46
    @AngelusMortis If not grammar, what else would decide whether the piece of code is legal or not?
    – Mohit Jain
    Mar 14, 2016 at 11:04
  • 6
    @AngelusMortis I was not trying to prove you are wrong. I put my point to discuss forward and understand your point of view about how could I make this answer more informative.
    – Mohit Jain
    Mar 14, 2016 at 11:08
  • 9
    @MohitJain: Actually, the C++ language isn't fully specified by its grammar. E.g. int x; int x; is a simple example that's allowed by the grammar but illegal nonetheless.
    – MSalters
    Mar 14, 2016 at 12:05
  • 4
    Well, he asks whether it's legal, and that means it must be permitted by the grammar, and not banned by other rules. The grammar describes a superset of the valid C++ programs. But it's hard to prove a negative, of course.
    – MSalters
    Mar 14, 2016 at 12:09
  • 1
    @MohitJain: I think your quote from the standard and then your claim that "statement_true in your case is a try block" lacks proof, because the quote does not say whether try-block is statement_true or not. All it says if block can be defined in terms of statement_true, but it does not define what statement_true is, does it? In that sense, your quote from the standard is meaningless and irrelevant to your claim because you did not connect all the mandatory text from the standard to back your claim.
    – Nawaz
    Dec 19, 2016 at 4:16
40

is it legal to put the try-block right after the if condition?

It is legal. Your code is same as (and better to write as):

if (true) {
    try
    {
        // works as expected with both true and false, but is it legal?
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

So if the condition is false then the try-catch block won't be executed. If this is what you expect, it's fine.

4
  • 4
    If you remove the outermost { and } braces, the equivalence becomes trivially obvious. Mar 14, 2016 at 14:33
  • 1
    I agree. It's just that removing the braces makes it obvious that the if statement in the original question is exactly the same not counting spaces. Without braces, your formatting reveals that there's nothing "magical" in putting a try-catch block right after the if statement. Mar 14, 2016 at 15:02
  • 8
    As long as we're promoting good style, shouldn't the code stick to one or the other bracing style? Or is this meant to make everyone equally dissatisfied? ;)
    – user2005819
    Mar 15, 2016 at 1:19
  • Not sure I agree that this is better or more readable. This is more traditional, certainly, but ops way reads more like an english sentence, where as this reads like code. Apples and oranges maybe, but equally readable, and equally correct imho. This is like if blocks with a single, short statement. I'm for putting that statement on the same line and doing away with the braces. If it's all on the same line, you'd have to be blind not to realise you need to add braces if you want to add something to the block, and I believe most IDEs will insert the braces for you anyway (don't quote me though)
    – Kraiden
    Mar 15, 2016 at 21:04
22

Yes. The braces of an if are optional. Imagine you have {} around the try { .. } catch { .. }.

It may interest you to know that this is what happens when you write if/else if/else; C++ doesn't actually have else if … so this:

if (A) {

}
else if (B) {

}

is actually parsed as this:

if (A) {

}
else
   if (B) {

   }

which is this:

if (A) {

}
else {
   if (B) {

   }
}
5
  • 2
    Lightning strikes :p Mar 14, 2016 at 11:13
  • 2
    C++ doesn't actually have else if Whoooa Mar 14, 2016 at 22:57
  • @Derek朕會功夫 There is no excplicit elseif token such as can be found in some languages. The if part of the else if construct is a whole new statement, and this causes some interesting misunderstandings in code that doesn't recognize it as such.
    – Corey
    Mar 15, 2016 at 6:07
  • 1
    @Corey Yes that's what my answer says Mar 15, 2016 at 10:31
  • @BarryTheHatchet Which is why I commented instead of answering :)
    – Corey
    Mar 16, 2016 at 3:31
9

It's well-formed. try-blocks are statements as per [stmt.stmt]/1, and statements are following if (…) as per [stmt.select]/1.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.