8

I wonder why it works and why it does not return an error:

SELECT 2015_11

Result:

╔══════╗
║ _11  ║
╠══════╣
║ 2015 ║
╚══════╝

Second case:

SELECT 2.1_a

╔═════╗
║ _a  ║
╠═════╣
║ 2.1 ║
╚═════╝

Checking metadata:

SELECT  name, system_type_name
FROM sys.dm_exec_describe_first_result_set(
N'SELECT 2015_11', NULL, 0) 
UNION ALL
SELECT  name, system_type_name
FROM sys.dm_exec_describe_first_result_set(
N'SELECT 3.2_a', NULL, 0) 

╔══════╦══════════════════╗
║ name ║ system_type_name ║
╠══════╬══════════════════╣
║ _11  ║ int              ║
║ _a   ║ numeric(2,1)     ║
╚══════╩══════════════════╝

While identifier that starts with letter behaves as I think it should:

SELECT a_11
-- Invalid column name 'a_11'.

LiveDemo

9

SQL treats query like

SELECT 2015_11

as

SELECT 2015 _11 

which is shortcut for

SELECT 2015 AS [_11]

SQL Server expects column names to follow some naming convention rules as detailed in this MSDN link

The names of variables, functions, and stored procedures must comply with the following rules for Transact-SQL identifiers. The first character must be one of the following:

  1. A letter as defined by the Unicode Standard 3.2. The Unicode definition of letters includes Latin characters from a through z, from A through Z, and also letter characters from other languages.
  2. The underscore (_), at sign (@), or number sign (#).

    Certain symbols at the beginning of an identifier have special meaning in SQL Server. A regular identifier that starts with the at sign always denotes a local variable or parameter and cannot be used as the name of any other type of object. An identifier that starts with a number sign denotes a temporary table or procedure. An identifier that starts with double number signs (##) denotes a global temporary object. Although the number sign or double number sign characters can be used to begin the names of other types of objects, we do not recommend this practice.

Some Transact-SQL functions have names that start with double at signs (@@). To avoid confusion with these functions, you should not use names that start with @@.

Also the syntax for SELECT as per MSDN is like

SELECT [ ALL | DISTINCT ] [ TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ] ] ::= { * | { table_name | view_name | table_alias }.* | { [ { table_name | view_name | table_alias }. ] { column_name | $IDENTITY | $ROWGUID } | udt_column_name [ { . | :: } { { property_name | field_name } | method_name ( argument [ ,...n] ) } ] | expression [ [ AS ] column_alias ] } | column_alias = expression } [ ,...n ]

In this case the SQL parser first checks for table name, and then column name, Identity and rowguid, and so on till it hits the match with

| expression [ [ AS ] column_alias ]

It then reads literal value till underscore character which is when it realizes that literal must have ended and starts parsing the later characters as Column_alias without as explicit AS

To verify this try following code in SQL server

SELECT 2015AS _11

This will produce same results as

SELECT 2015_11

Also to verify what I just wrote above see the screenshot from SSMS which does a code highlighting on AS

enter image description here

In your first example 2015 is integer literal and in second example 2.1 is decimal literal

In your third example a is not a valid literal. If you try

SELECT 'a'_8

This will give you result like

╔═════╗
║ _8  ║
╠═════╣
║ a   ║
╚═════╝

PS: You'll see that this works pretty much the same way with # as well

So SELECT 2015#11 will give similar results

╔══════╗
║ #11  ║
╠══════╣
║ 2015 ║
╚══════╝
  • Could you provide some docs about this behavior? I agree that it could be the case, but it should be mentioned somewhere. – Lukasz Szozda Mar 14 '16 at 12:55
  • Underscore triggs "next token" by the scanner. I.e literal 2015 followed by (missing whitespace) and then _11 (valid column alias.) – jarlh Mar 14 '16 at 13:01
3

To understand what is happening, you need to understand what SQL Server accepts as identifiers. There are a lot of rules, which are documented here. But, the important one is:

The first character must be one of the following:

  1. A letter as defined by the Unicode Standard 3.2. The Unicode definition of letters includes Latin characters from a through z, from A through Z, and also letter characters from other languages.

  2. The underscore (_), at sign (@), or number sign (#).

The important point is that when the SQL Server parser encounters a digit, it says to itself: "This is a number". When it hits the underscore, it says "Well, no more number, must be starting something else". The parser recognizes the second component as a valid identifier, so this is treated as:

select 2015 _11

which is for a column alias, even without the as.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.