I have a simple example of two tests (A,B) where B depends on A being run.

If I am using Mocha, I can nest test B within A:

describe.only( 'AB:', function() {

    describe( 'A', function() {
        it( 'A1', function() {
            assert.equal( 1, 2 );
        } );

        describe( 'B', function() {
            it( 'B1', function() {
                assert.equal( 1, 1 );
            } );
        } );
    } );
} );

But both A and B are run even if A fails.

How is this any different than not using nesting?

describe.only( 'AB:', function() {

    describe( 'A&B', function() {
        it( 'A1', function() {
            assert.equal( 1, 2 );
        } );

        it( 'B1', function() {
            assert.equal( 1, 1 );
        } );
    } );
} );

Is there any way to skip B if A fails?

Ok, there are two questions, so I'll try to answer both.

  1. Is there any way to skip B if A fails?

    Generally you should write tests that are not dependent on each other.

    Sometimes tests depend on having certain setup or state before they're able to be run properly though, in which case it's best to do the setup in a before() or beforeEach() block. If either of these blocks fail, the tests after them are not run. Thus you can throw an error in those blocks, when your build up is in a way that you know none of the tests inside that describe block are not going to work.

    describe.only('AB:', function() {
      var numberUnderTest = 0;
    
      describe('A&B', function() {
        it('A1', function() {
          assert.equal(1, 1 * numberUnderTest);
        });
    
        describe('B', function() {
          before(function() {
            if (numberUnderTest === 0) {
              throw 'cannot divide by zero';
            }
          });
    
          it('B1', function() {
            assert.equal(1, 1 / numberUnderTest);
          });
        });
      });
    });
    
  2. If I am using Mocha, I can nest test B within A
    [...]
    How is this any different than not using nesting?

    Nesting B inside a describe block allows you to use a different setup for B1 than for A1, while still inheriting some of A's setup.

    describe('A', function() {
      var numberUnderTest;
      var anotherNumber;
    
      beforeEach(function() {
        numberUnderTest = 1;
        anotherNumber = 0;
      });
    
      it('A1'), function() {
        assert.equal(0, anotherNumber * numberUnderTest);
      });
    
      describe('B', function() {
        before(function() {
          anotherNumber = 1;
        });
    
        it('B1', function() {
          assert.equal(1, anotherNumber / numberUnderTest);
        });
      });
    });
    
  • 1
    Thanks, I understand tests should be independent which is what we do for unit tests, but we're also writing end-to-end tests in Mocha which is why I've asked this question about dependent steps. – Alister Scott Mar 15 '16 at 23:23
  • Well, as far as I know, you can't tell Mocha to fail other tests when one fails directly. But as a workaround you could use a boolean variable that you update during the first test and add a before block in front of all the dependent tests that throws error, if the first test failed. – t0mppa Mar 16 '16 at 1:46
  • @AlisterScott I came across this question with the same need, to run tests step by step for an end-to-end test. Did you ever figure this out? – rhlsthrm Mar 6 at 0:55
  • 1
    @rhlsthrm we wrote a fork which allows this, it won't be accepted by Mocha but we use it anyway: github.com/Automattic/mocha – Alister Scott Mar 6 at 4:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest way to achieve this is to use mocha-steps:

describe('my smoke test', function() {

  step('login', function() {
  });

  step('buy an item', function() {
    throw new Error('failed');
  });

  step('check my balance', function() {
  });

  xstep('temporarily ignored', function() {
  });

});

Full blog post: https://watirmelon.blog/2018/07/04/bailing-with-mocha-e2e-tests/

Is there any way to skip B if A fails?

This pattern has been working very fell for me:

var itCanLogin;

it('Can login', function() {
  ...

  itCanLogin = true;
});

it('Can Logout', function(){
   if(!itCanLogin) this.skip()

   ...
})

Could also use assert(itCanLogin) but this.skip() helps to keep output cleaner by not producing stacktraces & errors - easier to notice the source of problem this way.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.