71

I have looked everywhere and I still have issue debugging TypeScript inside VS Code. I have read this thread but still I am not able to hit my breakpoints placed inside a TypeScript file, hitting the breakpoints in .js files all works fine.

So here is the simplest "hello world" project I have set up.

  • app.ts:

    var message: string = "Hello World";
    
    console.log(message);
    
  • tsconfig.json

    {
        "compilerOptions": {
            "target": "es5",
            "sourceMap": true
        }
    }
    
  • launch.json

    {
        "version": "0.2.0",
        "configurations": [
            {
                "name": "Launch",
                "type": "node",
                "request": "launch",
                "program": "${workspaceRoot}/app.js",
                "stopOnEntry": false,
                "args": [],
                "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}",
                "preLaunchTask": null,
                "runtimeExecutable": null,
                "runtimeArgs": [
                    "--nolazy"
                ],
                "env": {
                    "NODE_ENV": "development"
                },
                "externalConsole": false,
                "sourceMaps": true,
                "outDir": null
            }
        ]
    }
    

I have generated the js.map files by running the tsc --sourcemap app.ts command.

After all of those steps when I set a breakpoint on the console.log(message); row and launch the program (F5) from the "Debug" tab that breakpoint is grayed out saying "Breakpoint ignored because generated code not found (source map problem?)." I attached a screenshot of what I am observing:

enter image description here

What am I missing?

Edit:

Hi, I am still stuck on this. I managed to make one sample project that was hitting the break points but after I tried to copy that project to a different location on my HDD the break points again became gray and were not hit. What I did different in this test project was to use inline sourcemaps by compiling the TypeScript files with tsc app.ts --inlinesourcemap

I uploaded the mentioned sample project to GitHub so you can take a look at it here.

17 Answers 17

26

Setting "outFiles" : ["${workspaceRoot}/compiled/**/*.js"], solved the issue for me.

"outFiles" value should match one set in tsconfig.json for outDir and mapRoot which is ${workspaceRoot} in your case, so try "outFiles": "${workspaceRoot}/**/*.js"

Here are my tsconfig.json

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "module": "commonjs",
        "noImplicitAny": true,
        "removeComments": true,
        "preserveConstEnums": true,
        "sourceMap": true,
        "target": "es6",
        "outFiles": ["${workspaceRoot}/compiled/**/*.js"],
        "mapRoot": "compiled"
    },
    "include": [
        "app/**/*",
        "typings/index.d.ts"
    ],
    "exclude": [
        "node_modules",
        "**/*.spec.ts"
    ]
}


and launch.json

{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "type": "node",
            "request": "launch",
            "name": "Launch Program",
            "program": "${workspaceRoot}/compiled/app.js",
            "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}",
            "outDir": "${workspaceRoot}/compiled",
            "sourceMaps": true
        }
    ]
}
  • 2
    Thanks a huge lot! I've spent a whole day searching for the solution to my problem, and using outDir with sourceMaps finally fixed it! – Maksym Mar 8 '17 at 14:46
  • This should be selected as the answer. Huge thanks! – electrotype Aug 7 '17 at 13:58
  • Under windows using VSC 1.8.1 and Node.js 8.9.1 i had to make these changes launch.json: "outFiles": [], instead of outDir": "${workspaceRoot}/compiled", and i had to switch from "program": "${workspaceRoot}/app.js", to "program": "${workspaceRoot}\\app.js", so \ instead of /. – surfmuggle Nov 22 '17 at 23:21
16

I came across this question while looking for a solution to a similar problem that I was having. Despite being different from OP's problem, it might help others.

Context: I was following the Visual Studio Code HelloWorld example and found myself unable to stop on break points.

I solved my problem by changing .vscode/launch.json so that "sourceMaps": true attribute under the Launch configuration was set (it starts default on false).

  • 3
    Please note: for me, sourceMaps did need to be set to true, but I also had to set outFiles as noted in the next answer. – fool4jesus May 4 '17 at 14:14
  • Same here! Without, vscode stopped only on debugger; (well, at least that. As a litmus test to start with...). – with "outDir": "${workspaceRoot}/build" also breakpoints do work nicely... (so probably, vscode can't reveal source-side breakpoints on the build-side (which it is running, naturally) without...) – Frank Nocke Aug 13 '17 at 13:12
6

I think the problem might be in your 'program' section of launch.json. Try it like this:

{
    // Name of configuration; appears in the launch configuration drop down menu.
    "name": "Launch",
    // Type of configuration.
    "type": "node",
    "request": "launch",
    // Workspace relative or absolute path to the program.
    "program": "${workspaceRoot}/app.ts",
    // Automatically stop program after launch.
    "stopOnEntry": false,
    // Command line arguments passed to the program.
    "args": [],
    // Workspace relative or absolute path to the working directory of the program being debugged. Default is the current workspace.
    "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}",
    // Workspace relative or absolute path to the runtime executable to be used. Default is the runtime executable on the PATH.
    "runtimeExecutable": null,
    // Optional arguments passed to the runtime executable.
    "runtimeArgs": ["--nolazy"],
    // Environment variables passed to the program.
    "env": {
        "NODE_ENV": "development"
    },
    // Use JavaScript source maps (if they exist).
    "sourceMaps": true,
    // If JavaScript source maps are enabled, the generated code is expected in this directory.
    "outDir": "${workspaceRoot}"
}
  • I changed the "program": "${workspaceRoot}/app.js" to "program": "${workspaceRoot}/app.ts" but still the breakpoint in the .ts file is not being hit, only the one in the .js file is being hit. – Vladimir Amiorkov Mar 15 '16 at 9:32
  • Can you follow the answer I gave in the following post: stackoverflow.com/questions/35606423/… Starting with checking paths in map.js file. It should help you to pinpoint the problem. – Amid Mar 15 '16 at 9:40
  • When running the sample project from that thread (github.com/7brutus7/stackoverflow) I do get a breakpoint in the .ts file. Unfortunately I am totally lost how that works in that project and not in my sampler project. – Vladimir Amiorkov Mar 15 '16 at 11:22
  • In your original code - do you use locally installed tsc or global (check tasks.json)? In the previous thread there where some issues with the global instance. – Amid Mar 15 '16 at 11:31
  • I use the global tsc, in the auto generated tasks.json it is set like this ""command": "tsc"" The tsc version is 1.8.7 – Vladimir Amiorkov Mar 15 '16 at 11:42
5

Facing the same issue and solved it by correcting the path to .ts files.
My project contains src and dist dirs and the problem was that the generated .map files didn't have the correct path to the src dir.

The fix - tsconfig.json:

{
    "compilerOptions": {
        "target": "es5",
        "module": "commonjs",
        "sourceMap": true,
        "outDir": "dist",
        "sourceRoot": "../src"
    }
}

Initially, my sourceRoot was pointing to src and there is no src dir inside dist.

Also, sourceMaps should be set to true inside launch.json.

  • This is a good summary of major issues. sourceMaps in launch.json is required as stated, but I just had an issue due to having changed my launch.json "program" value to point to a .js file instead of a .ts one. VS Code hit breakpoint.. Working again! Cheerz! – jwwishart Dec 8 '16 at 12:03
  • I spent so much time working on this and your tip about sourceRoot turned out to be the solution. Ugh! I wish this wasn't so hard to get working. I wish when you run tsc --init the comment associated with the sourceRoot field as more descriptive and explained what structure it actually expects for the files so you could figure out what the right value was. In any case, THANKS! – Michael Tiller Jan 27 '18 at 20:03
5

After ripping my hair out all day, I finally got it to work.

The problem is there's three files to fiddle with - launch.json, tsconfig.json, and webpack.config.js so it's all combinatorial.

the diagnosticLogging was key to helping me figure it out.

Microsoft please make this easier... Really, vscode could have figured this out or at least guided me more on the process.

Anyway here's what finally worked in my launch.json:

"url": "http://localhost:8080/",
"sourceMaps": true,
"webRoot": "${workspaceRoot}",
"diagnosticLogging": true,
"sourceMapPathOverrides": { "webpack:///src/*": "${workspaceRoot}/src/*" }

my tsconfig.json:

"outDir": "dist",
"sourceMap": true

my webpack.config.js:

output: {
   path: 'dist/dev',
   filename: '[name].js'
},
...
module: {
    loaders: [...],
    preLoaders: [{
        test: /\.js$/,
        loader: "source-map-loader"
    }]
}
...
plugins: [
    new webpack.SourceMapDevToolPlugin(),
    ...
],
devtool: "cheap-module-eval-source-map",
  • Thanks for sharing, for some reason I had to add that sourceMapPathOverride as well. – M. Herold Feb 15 '17 at 23:50
  • 3
    diagnosticLogging is now deprecated... use trace instead. – Lucas Apr 6 '17 at 23:42
3

Facing the same issue and solved it by correcting "webRoot" config in launch.json. Here's my workspace's explorer view.

Since the compiling result main.js and main.js.map are in "./project/www/build" directory, I change the "webRoot" entry to "${workspaceRoot}/project/www/build" from "${workspaceRoot}", and it worked!

The launch.json file is as follow:

{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "Launch Chrome against localhost",
            "type": "chrome",
            "request": "launch",
            "url": "http://localhost:8100",
            "sourceMaps": true,
            "webRoot": "${workspaceRoot}/project/www/build"
        },
        {
            "name": "Attach to Chrome",
            "type": "chrome",
            "request": "attach",
            "port": 9222,
            "url": "http://localhost:8100",
            "sourceMaps": true,
            "webRoot": "${workspaceRoot}/project/www/build"
        }
    ]
}
  • Thanks for solution helped me resolve my issue. I was getting increasingly frustrated as the breakpoints were not getting detected. – LearnToLive Feb 18 '17 at 10:25
  • @LearnToLive, I'm glad to hear that you resolved your issue. And I want to say thank you for helping me earning my first badge. – Hope Sun Feb 20 '17 at 5:41
3
outFiles": ["${workspaceRoot}/compiled/**/*.js"],

This saved my life, because TS wasn't looking for sub-dirs. Thanks a lot

  • 4
    Please don't add "thanks" as answers. They don't actually provide an answer to the question, and can be perceived as noise by its future visitors. Once you earn enough reputation, you will gain privileges to upvote answers you like. This way future visitors of the question will see a higher vote count on that answer, and the answerer will also be rewarded with reputation points. See Why is voting important. – Petter Friberg May 22 '17 at 18:56
  • relative to this answer on same question – Petter Friberg May 22 '17 at 18:57
  • @TheDictator please do only edit a post in the LQP queue if you are sure it is an answer (with your edit action you state "Looks OK" after my edit). In this case the code is from another post (see my comments above), it could be seen as plagiarism but user is probably only thanking. – Petter Friberg May 23 '17 at 7:02
  • This helped even though I was attaching vscode to running server. For the benefit of others attaching the configuration which worked for me -> code : { "type": "node", "request": "attach", "name": "Attach", "sourceMaps": true, "port": 5858, "outFiles": [ "${workspaceRoot}/dist/**/*.js" ] }, – Anoop Isaac May 31 '17 at 17:21
  • 1
    I don't understand why people do so much blabla. This is the only accurate answer, you need to refer the outFiles in launch.json because if you are in a typescript project this is the only way to tell the debugger where are the original files to map. – vdegenne Apr 11 '18 at 11:25
2

Update: TypeScript debugging is now added in 0.3.0 Update: Always clear your breakpoints, then attach, then add breakpoints. This is a bug and has been reported.

2

None of the other answers worked for me.

I then realised the program attribute in my launch.json was pointing to the .js file, but my project is a TypeScript project.

I changed it to point to the TypeScript (.ts) file, and set the outFiles attribute to point to where the compiled code lives:

{
    "type": "node",
    "request": "launch",
    "name": "Launch Program",
    "program": "${workspaceRoot}/src/server/Server.ts",
    "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}",
    "outFiles": ["${workspaceRoot}/dist/**/*.js"]
}

This solved the issue for me!

1

There is really only one way to resolve this and that is to look at the source map path that is actually used.

Add the following line to launch.json:

"diagnosticLogging": true,

Among a lot of other stuff, your console will have lines like these:

SourceMap: mapping webpack:///./src/main.ts => C:\Whatever\The\Path\main.ts, via sourceMapPathOverrides entry - "webpack:///./*": "C:/Whatever/The/Path/*"

And then you just tweak your sourceMapPathOverrides to make the path match to your actual source path. I've found that I needed slightly different configuration for different projects, so understanding how to debug this really helped.

1

After a lot of time wasted on resolving this issue, it turned out the best way is to turn on debugging trace by adding the following line in launch.json.

"trace": true

And see where the problem actually is. Your debug console will output something in the lines of:

Verbose logs are written to: /Users/whatever/Library/Application Support/Code/logs/blah/blah/debugadapter.txt

Among a lot of other stuff, your console will have lines like these:

SourceMap: mapping webpack:///./src/index.ts => C:\Some\Path\index.ts, via sourceMapPathOverrides entry - "webpack:///./*": "C:/Some/Path/*"

Use sourceMapPathOverride to fix it to actually match your path. The property "trace" used to be called "diagnosticLogging" which is no longer used.

0

Late to the party, but you can check this post on github Test globbing support for the outFiles attribute in the launch config #12254.

Basically in the new version of vscode, you must now use the glob pattern with the property outFilesin your task.json.

I had a simlar issue. I fixed by indicating the output dir with outFiles

0

This config in launch.json worked:

{ "type": "node", "request": "launch", "name": "Launch Program - app", "program": "${workspaceRoot}/src/server.ts", "cwd": "${workspaceFolder}", "outFiles": ["${workspaceRoot}/release/**"], "sourceMaps": true }

0

I would like to contribute to spare some hours of head banging.

I used Debugger for Chrome for VS code (you don't need this for webstorm), I would recommend spend 10min reading their page, it will enlighten your world.

After installing the debugger extension, make sure that source-map is installed, in my case I also needed source-map-loader. Check your package.json for that.

My launch.json which is the chrome debugger configuration (all my source files where under src) :

{
  // Use IntelliSense to learn about possible attributes.
  // Hover to view descriptions of existing attributes.
  // For more information, visit: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=830387
  "version": "0.2.0",
  "configurations": [{
      "type": "chrome",
      "request": "attach",
      "name": "Attach to Chrome",
      "port": 9222,
      "webRoot": "${workspaceRoot}/src"
    },
    {
      "type": "chrome",
      "request": "launch",
      "name": "Launch Chrome against localhost",
      "url": "http://localhost:8080",
      "webRoot": "${workspaceRoot}/",
      "sourceMapPathOverrides": {
        "webpack:///./*": "${webRoot}/*"
      }
    }
  ]
}

Add devtool: 'source-map' to your webpack.config.js. Other parameters that generates mapping inlines won't work with Chrome Debugger (they mention that on their page).

This is an example:

module.exports = {
  entry: "./src/index.js",
  output: {
    path: path.resolve(__dirname, "build"),
    filename: "bundle.js"
  },
  plugins: [
    new HtmlWebpackPlugin({
      title: "Tutorial",
      inject: "body",
      template: "src/html/index.html",
      filename: "index.html"
    }),
    new DashboardPlugin()
  ],
  devtool: 'source-map',  
  module: {
    loaders: [
      {
        test: /\.css$/,
        loader: "style-loader!css-loader"
      },
      {
        test: /\.js?$/,
        exclude: /(node_modules|bower_components)/,
        loader: "babel-loader",
        query: {
          presets: ["es2017", "react"],
          plugins: ['react-html-attrs']          
        }
      }
    ]
  },
  watch: true
};

Then you run your webpack: `webpack-dev-server --devtool source-map --progress --port 8080, I used webpack-dev-server but it has same options as webpack.

When you do that you must see a .map file of your generated app. If not then come back and verify your setup.

Now in VS Code switch to Debug Console and run .scripts. This is a very useful command because it shows you what generated code is mapped to which source.

Something like this: - webpack:///./src/stores/friendStore.js (/Users/your_user/Developer/react/tutorial/src/stores/friendStore.js)

If this is wrong then you have to verify your sourceMapPathOverrides in your launch.json, examples are available on the extension's page

0

yes! in my case changing this in launch.json file solve the problem:

  "sourceMapPathOverrides": {
    "webpack:///./~/*": "${webRoot}/node_modules/*",
    "webpack:///./*":   "${webRoot}/*",
    "webpack:///*":     "*",
    "webpack:///src/*": "${webRoot}/*",
  }
0

Using Angular I have found that I always point my folder directory to the src folder - that way my work-space is not so cluttered with root files that I never use. But this has given me several problems in the past especially when using VSCode, since many of the functionality seems to me to look at the folder structure, and start from there to run your files. (Expecting some of the missing files)

So I had this exact same problem with this error message, and learning from past experience I realized that I opened my project one folder deep, instead of the root <app name> folder. So I just closed my project and opened it one folder up (so that all the other files are also included in the folder structure) and my problem was immediately fixed.

I also believe that many of the above answers about changing your files and folder structure are workarounds to this problem of not opening your work project at the root folder, what ever framework/language you are using.

-2

if you switch to visual studio type script project you can debug ts files normally i think the issue in app.js.map generation file here is sample from visual studio app.js.map

{"version":3,"file":"app.js","sourceRoot":"","sources":["app.ts"],"names":["HelloWorld","HelloWorld.constructor"],"mappings":"AAAA;IACIA,oBAAmBA,OAAcA;QAAdC,YAAOA,GAAPA,OAAOA,CAAOA;IAEjCA,CAACA;IACLD,iBAACA;AAADA,CAACA,AAJD,IAIC;AAED,IAAI,KAAK,GAAG,IAAI,UAAU,CAAC,kBAAkB,CAAC,CAAC;AAC/C,OAAO,CAAC,GAAG,CAAC,KAAK,CAAC,OAAO,CAAC,CAAC"}

vs visual studio code app.js.map

{"version":3,"file":"app.js","sourceRoot":"","sources":["../app.ts"],"names":[],"mappings":"AACA;IACI,oBAAmB,OAAc;QAAd,YAAO,GAAP,OAAO,CAAO;IAEjC,CAAC;IACL,iBAAC;AAAD,CAAC,AAJD,IAIC;AACD,IAAI,KAAK,GAAC,IAAI,UAAU,CAAC,aAAa,CAAC,CAAC;AACxC,OAAO,CAAC,GAAG,CAAC,KAAK,CAAC,OAAO,CAAC,CAAC;AAC3B,OAAO,CAAC,GAAG,CAAC,OAAO,CAAC,CAAC"}

try to replace it and try again don't forget to consider directory hierarchy of sources

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