33

In numpy the dimensions of the resulting array vary at run time. There is often confusion between a 1d array and a 2d array with 1 column. In one case I can iterate over the columns, in the other case I cannot.

How do you solve elegantly that problem? To avoid littering my code with if statements checking for the dimensionality, I use this function:

def reshape_to_vect(ar):
    if len(ar.shape) == 1:
      return ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],1)
    return ar

However, this feels inelegant and costly. Is there a better solution?

2
  • What is the dtype? Looks structured.
    – hpaulj
    Mar 15, 2016 at 15:30
  • It's irrelevant, I just used that as an example of how I could end up with 1d or 2d array. My question is about how to convert elegantly 1d to 2d array systematically.
    – DevShark
    Mar 15, 2016 at 15:33

7 Answers 7

46

The simplest way:

ar.reshape(-1, 1)
1
  • 1
    The simplest method ever, works in hstack when adding new column to matrix
    – Zhannie
    Feb 11, 2021 at 17:05
20

You could do -

ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],-1)

That second input to reshape : -1 takes care of the number of elements for the second axis. Thus, for a 2D input case, it does no change. For a 1D input case, it creates a 2D array with all elements being "pushed" to the first axis because of ar.shape[0], which was the total number of elements.

Sample runs

1D Case :

In [87]: ar
Out[87]: array([ 0.80203158,  0.25762844,  0.67039516,  0.31021513,  0.80701097])

In [88]: ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],-1)
Out[88]: 
array([[ 0.80203158],
       [ 0.25762844],
       [ 0.67039516],
       [ 0.31021513],
       [ 0.80701097]])

2D Case :

In [82]: ar
Out[82]: 
array([[ 0.37684126,  0.16973899,  0.82157815,  0.38958523],
       [ 0.39728524,  0.03952238,  0.04153052,  0.82009233],
       [ 0.38748174,  0.51377738,  0.40365096,  0.74823535]])

In [83]: ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],-1)
Out[83]: 
array([[ 0.37684126,  0.16973899,  0.82157815,  0.38958523],
       [ 0.39728524,  0.03952238,  0.04153052,  0.82009233],
       [ 0.38748174,  0.51377738,  0.40365096,  0.74823535]])
3
  • 2
    A variant of this answer is: x = np.reshape(x, (len(x),-1)), which also deals with the case when the input is a 1d or 2d list.
    – Luca Citi
    Mar 5, 2017 at 19:53
  • @LucaCiti make this a separate answer so I can vote it up.
    – Doctor J
    Feb 1, 2018 at 23:31
  • Done. Thanks for your recommendation.
    – Luca Citi
    Feb 2, 2018 at 23:54
4

To avoid the need to reshape in the first place, if you slice a row / column with a list, or a "running" slice, you will get a 2D array with one row / column

import numpy as np
x = np.array(np.random.normal(size=(4,4)))
print x, '\n'

Result:
[[ 0.01360395  1.12130368  0.95429414  0.56827029]
 [-0.66592215  1.04852182  0.20588886  0.37623406]
 [ 0.9440652   0.69157556  0.8252977  -0.53993904]
 [ 0.6437994   0.32704783  0.52523173  0.8320762 ]] 

y = x[:,[0]]
print y, 'col vector \n'
Result:
[[ 0.01360395]
 [-0.66592215]
 [ 0.9440652 ]
 [ 0.6437994 ]] col vector 


y = x[[0],:]
print y, 'row vector \n'

Result:
[[ 0.01360395  1.12130368  0.95429414  0.56827029]] row vector 

# Slice with "running" index on a column
y = x[:,0:1]
print y, '\n'

Result:
[[ 0.01360395]
 [-0.66592215]
 [ 0.9440652 ]
 [ 0.6437994 ]] 

Instead if you use a single number for choosing the row/column, it will result in a 1D array, which is the root cause of your issue:

y = x[:,0]
print y, '\n'

Result:
[ 0.01360395 -0.66592215  0.9440652   0.6437994 ] 
4

A variant of the answer by divakar is: x = np.reshape(x, (len(x),-1)), which also deals with the case when the input is a 1d or 2d list.

1

There are mainly two ways to go from 1 dimensional array (N) to 2 dimensional array with 1 column
(N x 1):

  1. Indexing with np.newaxis;
  2. Reshape with reshape() method.
x = np.array([1, 2, 3])  # shape: (3,) <- 1d

x[:, None]               # shape: (3, 1) <- 2d (single column matrix)
x[:, np.newaxis]         # shape: (3, 1) <- a meaningful alias to None

x.reshape(-1, 1)         # shape: (3, 1)
0

I asked about dtype because your example is puzzling.

I can make a structured array with 3 elements (1d) and 3 fields:

In [1]: A = np.ones((3,), dtype='i,i,i')
In [2]: A
Out[2]: 
array([(1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 1)], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i4'), ('f1', '<i4'), ('f2', '<i4')])

I can access one field by name (adding brackets doesn't change things)

In [3]: A['f0'].shape
Out[3]: (3,)

but if I access 2 fields, I still get a 1d array

In [4]: A[['f0','f1']].shape
Out[4]: (3,)
In [5]: A[['f0','f1']]
Out[5]: 
array([(1, 1), (1, 1), (1, 1)], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i4'), ('f1', '<i4')])

Actually those extra brackets do matter, if I look at values

In [22]: A['f0']
Out[22]: array([1, 1, 1], dtype=int32)
In [23]: A[['f0']]
Out[23]: 
array([(1,), (1,), (1,)], 
      dtype=[('f0', '<i4')])

If the array is a simple 2d one, I still don't get your shapes

In [24]: A=np.ones((3,3),int)
In [25]: A[0].shape
Out[25]: (3,)
In [26]: A[[0]].shape
Out[26]: (1, 3)
In [27]: A[[0,1]].shape
Out[27]: (2, 3)

But as to question of making sure an array is 2d, regardless of whether the indexing returns 1d or 2, your function is basically ok

def reshape_to_vect(ar):
    if len(ar.shape) == 1:
      return ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],1)
    return ar

You could test ar.ndim instead of len(ar.shape). But either way it is not costly - that is, the execution time is minimal - no big array operations. reshape doesn't copy data (unless your strides are weird), so it is just the cost of creating a new array object with a shared data pointer.

Look at the code for np.atleast_2d; it tests for 0d and 1d. In the 1d case it returns result = ary[newaxis,:]. It adds the extra axis first, the more natural numpy location for adding an axis. You add it at the end.

ar.reshape(ar.shape[0],-1) is a clever way of bypassing the if test. In small timing tests it faster, but we are talking about microseconds, the effect of a function call layer.

np.column_stack is another function that creates column arrays if needed. It uses:

 if arr.ndim < 2:
        arr = array(arr, copy=False, subok=True, ndmin=2).T
1
  • Ok, I removed the example. I was trying to give a concrete example, but if it's confusing, it's better not to have it.
    – DevShark
    Mar 15, 2016 at 17:07
0
y = np.array(12)
y = y.reshape(-1,1)
print(y.shape)

O/P:- (1, 1)

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