32

For example, I have such model:

public class Blog
{
    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public string Url { get; set; }

    public BlogImage BlogImage { get; set; }
}

public class BlogImage
{
    public int BlogImageId { get; set; }
    public byte[] Image { get; set; }
    public string Caption { get; set; }

    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    public Blog Blog { get; set; }
} 

I want to return in ImageView view Url and Image.

Where do I need to create and define that SQL view?

  • I think you might need to provide more resources. Is this relating to MVC? – Willwsharp Mar 15 '16 at 13:45
  • @Willwsharp yes it is related to asp.net core – Yurii N. Mar 15 '16 at 15:06
  • 1
    I mean is this an MVC application? As in, are you referring to creating an MVC view? Also, what exactly are you trying to return? I think you should edit your question to better reflect what you are trying to do. – Willwsharp Mar 15 '16 at 15:13
  • 1
    @Willwsharp no, this is SQL view, I think it doesn't matter in which application I would use it. – Yurii N. Mar 16 '16 at 9:07
33

In Entity Framework Core 2.1 we can use Query Types as Yuriy N suggested.

A more detailed article on how to use them can be found here

The most straight forward approach according to the article's examples would be:

1.We have for example the following entity Models to manage publications

public class Magazine
{
  public int MagazineId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public string Publisher { get; set; }
  public List<Article> Articles { get; set; }
}

public class Article
{
  public int ArticleId { get; set; }
  public string Title { get; set; }
  public int MagazineId { get; set; }
  public DateTime PublishDate { get;  set; }
  public Author Author { get; set; }
  public int AuthorId { get; set; }
}
public class Author
{
  public int AuthorId { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public List<Article> Articles { get; set; }
}

2.We have a view called AuthorArticleCounts, defined to return the name and number of articles an author has written

SELECT
  a.AuthorName,
  Count(r.ArticleId) as ArticleCount
from Authors a
  JOIN Articles r on r.AuthorId = a.AuthorId
GROUP BY a.AuthorName

3.We go and create a model to be used for the View

public class AuthorArticleCount
{
  public string AuthorName { get; private set; }
  public int ArticleCount { get; private set; }
}

4.We create after that a DbQuery property in my DbContext to consume the view results inside the Model

public DbQuery<AuthorArticleCount> AuthorArticleCounts{get;set;}

5.Finally we can easily get the results of the View like this.

var results=_context.AuthorArticleCounts.ToList();
  • this gives me an exception.... System.ArgumentNullException: 'Value cannot be null. Parameter name: source' – Jackal Apr 15 at 11:04
  • 1
    @Jackal well it sounds like you have somewhere a Null value in the DB while you shouldn't :). – Anastasios Selmanis Apr 15 at 14:25
  • hi Anastasios, I have the same issue, but one more problem, I need to include navigation property in the view class. but it throws me error: stackoverflow.com/questions/56137189/… – Franva May 15 at 15:45
22

Views are not currently supported by Entity Framework Core. See https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework/issues/827.

That said, you can trick EF into using a view by mapping your entity to the view as if it were a table. This approach comes with limitations. e.g. you can't use migrations, you need to manually specific a key for EF to us, and some queries may not work correctly. To get around this last part, you can write SQL queries by hand

context.Images.FromSql("SELECT * FROM dbo.ImageView")
  • 2
    I tried to use [NotMapped] attribute to view class, but EF still trying to create the table with the name of view. – Yurii N. Mar 16 '16 at 9:14
  • Like I said...views are not truly supported. You're likely to encounter these kinds of issues. – natemcmaster Mar 16 '16 at 14:51
  • I am not a fan of FromSql being tied to a DbSet and forcing the user to map a class to their DbContext. I see the traditional SqlQuery<T> from previous versions of EF as necessary to enable people to move to EF Core for things that are not supported yet as well as flexibility. I have created a user voice here: data.uservoice.com/forums/… – Matt Sanders Mar 28 '16 at 17:07
  • 2
    @MattSanders EF Core supports context.Set<T>().FromSql(). However, EF Core will require type T be configured in the IModel EF is using. If you want the functionality of a micro ORM, use a micro ORM. Dapper is pretty good for this. – natemcmaster Mar 28 '16 at 17:23
  • 1
    Whether now SQL Views are supported or not? Or still it is not supported? – Kunal Kakkad Dec 20 '17 at 8:20
13

Here is a new way to work with SQL views in EF Core: Query Types.

10

The EF Core doesn't create DBset for the SQL views automatically in the context calss, we can add them manually as below.

public partial class LocalDBContext : DbContext
{ 

    public LocalDBContext(DbContextOptions<LocalDBContext> options) : base(options)
    {

    }

    public virtual DbSet<YourView> YourView { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<YourView>(entity => {
            entity.HasKey(e => e.ID);
            entity.ToTable("YourView");
            entity.Property(e => e.Name).HasMaxLength(50);
        });
    }

}

The sample view is defined as below with few properties

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Project.Entities
{
    public partial class YourView
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int ID { get; set; }
    }
}

After adding a class for the view and DB set in the context class, you are good to use the view object through your context object in the controller.

  • But this is view, I don't need to create a table from that... – Yurii N. Apr 7 '18 at 19:29
  • jessedotnet.com/2016/04/13/… is a good reference works for me, too – Haobo Apr 25 '18 at 8:10
  • It's complaining about a primary key. Won't let me set it with the builder, wont let me run without :/ – Hecatonchires Apr 30 '18 at 0:57
  • This example was useful, thank you. – Dale C Jun 29 '18 at 2:42
1

QueryTypes is the canonical answer as of EF Core 2.1, but there is another way I have used when migrating from a database first approach (the view is already created in the database):

  • define the model to match view columns (either match model class name to view name or use Table attribute. Ensure [Key] attribute is applied to at least one column, otherwise data fetch will fail
  • add DbSet in your context
  • add migration (Add-Migration)
  • remove or comment out code for creation/drop of the "table" to be created/dropped based on provided model
  • update database (Update-Database)
  • I would really prefer not to touch auto-generated migration code, that's the only point which confuses me. – Yurii N. Mar 3 at 18:30
  • 1
    @YuriiN. - generally speaking, you are right not to touch generated code. However, migrations code is very easy to understand and the risk is rather low (create table means create + drop in two long statements). – Alexei Mar 3 at 18:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.