44

I'm starting to learn a bit of python (been using R) for data analysis. I'm trying to create two plots using seaborn, but it keeps saving the second on top of the first. How do I stop this behavior?

import seaborn as sns
iris = sns.load_dataset('iris')

length_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_length', y='species', data=iris).get_figure()
length_plot.savefig('ex1.pdf')
width_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_width', y='species', data=iris).get_figure()
width_plot.savefig('ex2.pdf')
67

You have to start a new figure in order to do that. There are multiple ways to do that, assuming you have matplotlib. Also get rid of get_figure() and you can use plt.savefig() from there.

Method 1

Use plt.clf()

import seaborn as sns
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

iris = sns.load_dataset('iris')

length_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_length', y='species', data=iris)
plt.savefig('ex1.pdf')
plt.clf()
width_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_width', y='species', data=iris)
plt.savefig('ex2.pdf')

Method 2

Call plt.figure() before each one

plt.figure()
length_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_length', y='species', data=iris)
plt.savefig('ex1.pdf')
plt.figure()
width_plot = sns.barplot(x='sepal_width', y='species', data=iris)
plt.savefig('ex2.pdf')
1
  • 4
    This answer "works", but it is a bit less preferred IMO as it relies on the matplotlib state machine interface rather than fully embracing the object-oriented interface. It's fine for quick plots, but at some point when scaling in complexity it would be better to use the latter. – mwaskom Mar 15 '16 at 20:28
15

I agree with a previous comment that importing matplotlib.pyplot is not the best software engineering practice as it exposes the underlying library. As I was creating and saving plots in a loop, then I needed to clear the figure and found out that this can now be easily done by importing seaborn only:

import seaborn as sns

data = np.random.normal(size=100)
path = "/path/to/img/plot.png"

plot = sns.distplot(data)
plot.get_figure().savefig(path)
plot.get_figure().clf() # this clears the figure

# ... continue with next figure
11

Create specific figures and plot onto them:

import seaborn as sns
iris = sns.load_dataset('iris')

length_fig, length_ax = plt.subplots()
sns.barplot(x='sepal_length', y='species', data=iris, ax=length_ax)
length_fig.savefig('ex1.pdf')

width_fig, width_ax = plt.subplots()
sns.barplot(x='sepal_width', y='species', data=iris, ax=width_ax)
width_fig.savefig('ex2.pdf')

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.