10

I have an updates table in Postgres is 9.4.5 like this:

goal_id    | created_at | status
1          | 2016-01-01 | green
1          | 2016-01-02 | red
2          | 2016-01-02 | amber

And a goals table like this:

id | company_id
1  | 1
2  | 2

I want to create a chart for each company that shows the state of all of their goals, per week.

example chart

I image this would require to generate a series of the past 8 weeks, finding the most recent update for each goal that came before that week, then counting the different statuses of the found updates.

What I have so far:

SELECT EXTRACT(year from generate_series) AS year, 
       EXTRACT(week from generate_series) AS week,
       u.company_id,
       COUNT(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'green') AS green_count,
       COUNT(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'amber') AS amber_count,
       COUNT(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'red') AS red_count
FROM generate_series(NOW() - INTERVAL '2 MONTHS', NOW(), '1 week')
LEFT OUTER JOIN (
  SELECT DISTINCT ON(year, week)
         goals.company_id,
         updates.status, 
         EXTRACT(week from updates.created_at) week,
         EXTRACT(year from updates.created_at) AS year,
         updates.created_at 
  FROM updates
  JOIN goals ON goals.id = updates.goal_id
  ORDER BY year, week, updates.created_at DESC
) u ON u.week = week AND u.year = year
GROUP BY 1,2,3

But this has two problems. It seems that the join on u isn't working as I thought it would. It seems to be joining on every row (?) returned from the inner query as well as this only selects the most recent update that happened from that week. It should grab the most recent update from before that week if it needs to.

This is some pretty complicated SQL and I love some input on how to pull it off.

Table structures and info

The goals table has around ~1000 goals ATM and is growing about ~100 a week:

                                           Table "goals"
     Column      |            Type             |                         Modifiers
-----------------+-----------------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------
 id              | integer                     | not null default nextval('goals_id_seq'::regclass)
 company_id      | integer                     | not null
 name            | text                        | not null
 created_at      | timestamp without time zone | not null default timezone('utc'::text, now())
 updated_at      | timestamp without time zone | not null default timezone('utc'::text, now())
Indexes:
    "goals_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
    "entity_goals_company_id_fkey" btree (company_id)
Foreign-key constraints:
    "goals_company_id_fkey" FOREIGN KEY (company_id) REFERENCES companies(id) ON DELETE RESTRICT

The updates table has around ~1000 and is growing around ~100 a week:

                                         Table "updates"
   Column   |            Type             |                            Modifiers
------------+-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------------------------
 id         | integer                     | not null default nextval('updates_id_seq'::regclass)
 status     | entity.goalstatus           | not null
 goal_id    | integer                     | not null
 created_at | timestamp without time zone | not null default timezone('utc'::text, now())
 updated_at | timestamp without time zone | not null default timezone('utc'::text, now())
Indexes:
    "goal_updates_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
    "entity_goal_updates_goal_id_fkey" btree (goal_id)
Foreign-key constraints:
    "updates_goal_id_fkey" FOREIGN KEY (goal_id) REFERENCES goals(id) ON DELETE CASCADE

 Schema |       Name        | Internal name | Size | Elements | Access privileges | Description
--------+-------------------+---------------+------+----------+-------------------+-------------
 entity | entity.goalstatus | goalstatus    | 4    | green   +|                   |
        |                   |               |      | amber   +|                   |
        |                   |               |      | red      |                   |
  • I suspect you want a window function - you can partition by your time slice – Codeman Mar 15 '16 at 22:10
  • @Codeman Hmm, looks like you're right. I've never used window functions. Do you happen to know any good resources to look at? Thanks! – Eric Koslow Mar 15 '16 at 23:31
  • Probably the one I linked you :) – Codeman Mar 17 '16 at 0:16
  • 1
    It would help if you extended your sample data to few dozen rows and added the expected result based on that sample data. It would help to understand the required logic and verify the correctness of the solution. If your real data set is significant (100K+ rows), it won't hurt to tell us how many rows each table has. It is quite common that efficiency of solution depends on the data distribution. – Vladimir Baranov Mar 19 '16 at 13:31
  • You should provide actual table definitions showing data types and constraints. And always your version of Postgres. – Erwin Brandstetter Mar 22 '16 at 13:42
7
+50

You need one data item per week and goal (before aggregating counts per company). That's a plain CROSS JOIN between generate_series() and goals. The (possibly) expensive part is to get the current state from updates for each. Like @Paul already suggested, a LATERAL join seems like the best tool. Do it only for updates, though, and use a faster technique with LIMIT 1.

And simplify date handling with date_trunc().

SELECT w_start
     , g.company_id
     , count(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'green') AS green_count
     , count(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'amber') AS amber_count
     , count(*) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'red')   AS red_count
FROM   generate_series(date_trunc('week', NOW() - interval '2 months')
                     , date_trunc('week', NOW())
                     , interval '1 week') w_start
CROSS  JOIN goals g
LEFT   JOIN LATERAL (
   SELECT status
   FROM   updates
   WHERE  goal_id = g.id
   AND    created_at < w_start
   ORDER  BY created_at DESC
   LIMIT  1
   ) u ON true
GROUP  BY w_start, g.company_id
ORDER  BY w_start, g.company_id;

To make this fast you need a multicolumn index:

CREATE INDEX updates_special_idx ON updates (goal_id, created_at DESC, status);

Descending order for created_at is best, but not strictly necessary. Postgres can scan indexes backwards almost exactly as fast. (Not applicable for inverted sort order of multiple columns, though.)

Index columns in that order. Why?

And the third column status is only appended to allow fast index-only scans on updates. Related case:

1k goals for 9 weeks (your interval of 2 months overlaps with at least 9 weeks) only require 9k index look-ups for the 2nd table of only 1k rows. For small tables like this, performance shouldn't be much of a problem. But once you have a couple of thousand more in each table, performance will deteriorate with sequential scans.

w_start represents the start of each week. Consequently, counts are for the start of the week. You can still extract year and week (or any other details represent your week), if you insist:

   EXTRACT(isoyear from w_start) AS year
 , EXTRACT(week    from w_start) AS week

Best with ISOYEAR, like @Paul explained.

SQL Fiddle.

Related:

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Lovely! :-) I thought about using a cross join but decided against it for some reason. @Eric should go with your answer. Obviously perf is all about testing but I'm much more confident in your version. :-) – Paul A Jungwirth Mar 23 '16 at 17:33
  • @Paul: This query is a spin off from a similar project I had recently - where I tested a lot to find this combination of query and index to perform best. Still, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. – Erwin Brandstetter Mar 24 '16 at 3:22
4

This seems like a good use for LATERAL joins:

SELECT  EXTRACT(ISOYEAR FROM s) AS year,
        EXTRACT(WEEK FROM s) AS week,
        u.company_id,
        COUNT(u.goal_id) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'green') AS green_count,
        COUNT(u.goal_id) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'amber') AS amber_count,
        COUNT(u.goal_id) FILTER (WHERE u.status = 'red') AS red_count
FROM    generate_series(NOW() - INTERVAL '2 months', NOW(), '1 week') s(w)
LEFT OUTER JOIN LATERAL (
  SELECT  DISTINCT ON (g.company_id, u2.goal_id) g.company_id, u2.goal_id, u2.status
  FROM    updates u2
  INNER JOIN goals g
  ON      g.id = u2.goal_id
  WHERE   u2.created_at <= s.w
  ORDER BY g.company_id, u2.goal_id, u2.created_at DESC
) u 
ON true
WHERE   u.company_id IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY year, week, u.company_id
ORDER BY u.company_id, year, week
;

Btw I am extracting ISOYEAR not YEAR to ensure I get sensible results around the beginning of January. For instance EXTRACT(YEAR FROM '2016-01-01 08:49:56.734556-08') is 2016 but EXTRACT(WEEK FROM '2016-01-01 08:49:56.734556-08') is 53!

EDIT: You should test on your real data, but I feel like this ought to be faster:

SELECT  year,
        week,
        company_id,
        COUNT(goal_id) FILTER (WHERE last_status = 'green') AS green_count,
        COUNT(goal_id) FILTER (WHERE last_status = 'amber') AS amber_count,
        COUNT(goal_id) FILTER (WHERE last_status = 'red') AS red_count
FROM    (
  SELECT  EXTRACT(ISOYEAR FROM s) AS year,
          EXTRACT(WEEK FROM s) AS week,
          u.company_id,
          u.goal_id,
          (array_agg(u.status ORDER BY u.created_at DESC))[1] AS last_status
  FROM    generate_series(NOW() - INTERVAL '2 months', NOW(), '1 week') s(t)
  LEFT OUTER JOIN ( 
    SELECT  g.company_id, u2.goal_id, u2.created_at, u2.status
    FROM    updates u2
    INNER JOIN goals g 
    ON      g.id = u2.goal_id
  ) u 
  ON      s.t >= u.created_at
  WHERE   u.company_id IS NOT NULL
  GROUP BY year, week, u.company_id, u.goal_id
) x
GROUP BY year, week, company_id
ORDER BY company_id, year, week
;

Still no window functions though. :-) Also you can speed it up a bit more by replacing (array_agg(...))[1] with a real first function. You'll have to define that yourself, but there are implementations on the Postgres wiki that are easy to Google for.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Oh wow, I'd heard of LATERAL joins before but have never used them. This is awesome thank you! – Eric Koslow Mar 19 '16 at 1:02
  • They are pretty nice! I've generally gotten excellent performance from LATERAL joins, but I'm a little worried about this one. I agree with @Codeman that this feels like you could also use windows functions . . . but if so I don't see how to do it! – Paul A Jungwirth Mar 19 '16 at 2:49
0

I use PostgreSQL 9.3. I'm interested in your question. I examined your data structure. Than I create the following tables.

Data structure

I insert the following records;

Company

Company records

Goals

Goals records

Updates

Updates Records

After that I wrote the following query, for correction

SELECT c.id company_id, c.name company_name, u.status goal_status, 
         EXTRACT(week from u.created_at) goal_status_week,
         EXTRACT(year from u.created_at) AS goal_status_year 
FROM company c
INNER JOIN goals g ON g.company_id = c.id 
INNER JOIN updates u ON u.goal_id = g.id
ORDER BY goal_status_year DESC, goal_status_week DESC;

I get the following results; Inner Sql result

At last I merge this query with week series

SELECT
             gs.company_id,
             gs.company_name,
             gs.goal_status,
             EXTRACT(year from w) AS year, 
       EXTRACT(week from w) AS week,
             COUNT(gs.*) cnt
FROM generate_series(NOW() - INTERVAL '3 MONTHS', NOW(), '1 week') w
LEFT JOIN(
SELECT c.id company_id, c.name company_name, u.status goal_status, 
             EXTRACT(week from u.created_at) goal_status_week,
       EXTRACT(year from u.created_at) AS goal_status_year 
FROM company c
INNER JOIN goals g ON g.company_id = c.id 
INNER JOIN updates u ON u.goal_id = g.id ) gs 
ON gs.goal_status_week = EXTRACT(week from w) AND gs.goal_status_year = EXTRACT(year from w)
GROUP BY company_id, company_name, goal_status, year, week
ORDER BY  year DESC, week DESC;

I get this result

Final result

Have a good day.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.