0

I have a very large table (called device_operation with 50 million rows) which holds all the operations of a product in its lifecycle (such as "start", "stop", "refill", ..." and the status of these operations (row status : Completed, Failed), with the ID of the associated device (row device_id) and a timestamp for each operation (row create_date).

Something like this :

/------+-----------+------------------+---------\
|   ID | Device ID | Create_Date      |  Status |
+------+-----------+------------------+---------+
|    1 |         1 | 2012-03-04 01:43 | Success |
|    2 |         4 | 2012-04-04 02:34 |  Failed |
|    3 |         9 | 2013-01-01 01:23 |  Failed |
|    4 |         4 | 2013-12-12 12:34 | Success |
|    5 |        23 | 2014-02-01 03:45 | Success |
|    6 |         1 | 2014-05-03 08:34 |  Failed |
\------+-----------+------------------+---------/

I also have another table (called subscription) that tells me when the warranty has started (row create_date) for the product (row device_id). Warranty lasts one year.

/-----------+------------------\
| Device ID |      Create_Date |
+-----------+------------------+
|         2 | 2011-04-03 05:00 |
|         4 | 2012-03-05 03:45 |
|         5 | 2012-03-05 06:07 |
|       ... |              ... |
\-----------+------------------/

I am using PostgreSQL.

I want to do the following :

  • List all device IDs which had at least one successful operation before a given date (2014-07-06)

For each of those devices, count :

  • The number of failed operations after that date + 2 days (2014-07-08), and the device was under warranty when the operation was attempted
  • The number of failed operations after that date + 2 days (2014-07-08), and the device was outside warranty when the operation was attempted
  • The number of successful operations after that date (device being under warranty or not)

I had some limited success with the following (query has been simplified a little bit for readability - there are other joins involved to get to the subscription table, and other criterias to include the devices in the list) :

SELECT distinct device_operation.device_id as did, subscription.create_date,
(
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM device_operation dop
    WHERE dop.device_id = device_operation.device_id and
    dop.create_date > '2014-07-08' and
    dop.status = 'Success'
) as success,
(
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM device_operation dop2
    WHERE
    dop2.device_id = subscription.device_id and
    dop2.create_date > '2014-07-08' and
    dop2.status = 'Failed' and
    dop2.create_date <= subscription.create_date + interval '1 year'
) as failed_during_warranty,
(
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM device_operation dop2
    WHERE
    dop2.device_id = subscription.device_id and
    dop2.create_date > '2014-07-08' and
    dop2.status = 'Failed' and
    dop2.create_date > subscription.create_date + interval '1 year'
) as failed_after_warranty,
FROM device_operation, subscription
WHERE
device_operation.status = 'Success' and -- list operations which are successful
device_operation.create_date <= '2014-07-06' and -- list operations before that date
device_operation.device_id = subscription.device_id -- get warranty start for each operation
ORDER BY success DESC, failed_during_warranty DESC, failed_after_warranty DESC

As you can guess, it's so slow I cannot run the query. However it gives you an idea of the structure.

I have tried to use NULLIF to combine the requests into one, in the hope it's going to make PostgreSQL only list the subquery once instead of 3, but it returns "subquery must return only one column" :

SELECT distinct device_operation.device_id as did, subscription.create_date,
(
SELECT COUNT(NULLIF(dop2.status != 'Success', true)) as completed, 
    COUNT(NULLIF(dop2.status != 'Failed' or not (dop2.create_date <= subscription.create_date + interval '1 year'), true)) as failed_in_warranty, 
    COUNT(NULLIF(dop2.status != 'Failed' or     (dop2.create_date <= subscription.create_date + interval '1 year'), true)) as failed_after_warranty
FROM device_operation dop2
WHERE
    dop2.device_id = device_operation.device_id and
    dop2.device_id = subscription.device_id and
    dop2.create_date > '2014-07-08'
) as subq
FROM device_operation, subscription
WHERE
device_operation.status = 'Success' and -- list operations which are successful
device_operation.create_date <= '2014-07-06' and -- list operations before that date
device_operation.device_id = subscription.device_id -- get warranty start for each operation
ORDER BY success DESC, failed_in_warranty DESC, failed_outside_warranty DESC

I also tried to move the subquery to the FROM clause but that doesn't work as I need to run the subquery for each row of the main query (or do I ? maybe there's a better way)

What I expect is something like this :

/-----------+---------+------------------------+-----------------------\
| Device ID | Success | Failed during warranty | Failed after warranty |
+-----------+---------+------------------------+-----------------------+
|    194853 |      10 |                      0 |                     0 |
|      7853 |       5 |                      5 |                     0 |
|      5848 |       3 |                      0 |                    56 |
|   8546455 |       0 |                     45 |                     0 |
|       102 |       0 |                      4 |                     1 |
|  69329548 |       0 |                      0 |                     9 |
|        17 |       0 |                      0 |                     0 |
\-----------+---------+------------------------+-----------------------+

Can someone help me find the most efficient way to do it ?

EDIT: Corner cases: You can consider all devices have an entry in subscription.

Thank you very much !

  • I think you can get a hint from stackoverflow.com/questions/14048098/… – ntalbs Mar 15 '16 at 23:54
  • As I said :"I also have another table (called subscription) that tells me when the warranty has started (row create_date) for the product (row device_id). Warranty lasts one year." – uski Mar 16 '16 at 0:10
  • Regarding the link provided, it does not help, unless I don't see something. It describes precisely what I have tried to do in my second attempt, and I have described why it doesn't work in my question (cannot return more than one row in a subquery). I have to work with a subquery from the structure of the information I have to get, I believe. – uski Mar 16 '16 at 0:11
  • I think this SELECT distinct device_operation.device_id as did, subscription.create_date, should be taken from a different table, such as devices. BTW, have you checked the execution plan? – cha Mar 16 '16 at 0:16
0

I think you just require conditional aggregation. I find the data structure and logic a bit hard to follow, but I think the following is basically what you need:

SELECT d.device_id,
       SUM(CASE WHEN d.status = 'Failed' AND d.create_date <= '2014-07-06' + interval '2 day'
                THEN 1 ELSE 0
           END) as NumFails,
       SUM(CASE WHEN d.status = 'Failed' AND d.create_date <= '2014-07-06' + interval '2 day' AND
                     d.create_date > s.create_date + interval '1 year'
                THEN 1 ELSE 0
           END) as NumFailsNoWarranty,
       SUM(CASE WHEN d.status = 'Success' AND d.create_date <= '2014-07-06' + interval '2 day'
                THEN 1 ELSE 0
           END) as NumSuccesses
FROM device_operation d JOIN
     subscription s
     ON d.device_id = s.device_id
GROUP BY d.device_id
HAVING SUM(CASE WHEN d.status = 'Success' AND d.create_date <= '2014-07-06' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) > 0;
  • Hmm, I don't think that does it (I tried). Let me rephrase my need : - I need to list all the devices which has at least once Successful operation, before a certain date. Then, for each of those devices, I need to look at what happened to them after that date : how many operations were successful after that date ? How many failed during their warranty ? How many failed after ? That's why I used a subquery, because it's the straightforward way to do what I said above. However, the performance penalty so big I can't do it ! And I'm sure there must be another way to do it. Thanks for looking! – uski Mar 16 '16 at 15:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.