7

Here is a constructor function A that gives instances 2 methods: printThing and printBall. I use JSDoc to document methods like this:

var A = function () {

    /**
     * Prints 'Thing'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */
    this.printThing = function (N) {
        var i = 0;
        while (i < N) {
            console.log('Thing');
            i++
        }
    };

    /**
     * Prints 'Ball'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */
    this.printBall = function (N) {
        var i = 0;
        while (i < N) {
            console.log('Ball');
            i++
        }
    };

};

Here is an equivalent constructor function that dynamically generates the same methods like this:

var A = function () {

    var me = this;
    var registerPrinter = function (name) {
        me['print' + name] = function (N) {
            var i = 0;
            while (i < N) {
                console.log(name);
                i++;
            }
        };
    };

    registerPrinter('Thing');
    registerPrinter('Ball');
}

The behaviour of the instances generated by the two constructor functions are identical:

> var a = new A();
> a.printBall(4);
Ball
Ball
Ball
Ball

How can I use JSDoc to document the generated methods in the second A constructor function?


EDIT: registerPrinter is private within the scope of the constructor function. It can (and should) be documented, but it's just used internally. This question is about documenting the resulting public interface of A instances.

1

3 Answers 3

7

@name is made for this:

This tag is best used in "virtual comments" for symbols that are not readily visible in the code...

ES6:

/** Class A */
class A {
    constructor () {
        ['Thing', 'Ball'].map((name) => {
            this['print' + name] = (N) => {
                let i = 0;
                while (i < N) {
                    console.log(name);
                    i++;
                }
            };
        });
    }
}

/**
 * @name A#printThing
 * @function
 * @memberof A
 * @description Prints 'Thing'
 * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
 */

/**
 * @name A#printBall
 * @function
 * @memberof A
 * @description Prints 'Ball'
 * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
 */

ES5:

/**
 * @class A
 */
var A = function () {

    var me = this;
    var registerPrinter = function (name) {
        me['print' + name] = function (N) {
            var i = 0;
            while (i < N) {
                console.log(name);
                i++;
            }
        };
    };

    ['Thing', 'Ball'].map(registerPrinter);

    /**
     * @name A#printThing
     * @function
     * @memberof A
     * @description Prints 'Thing'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */

    /**
     * @name A#printBall
     * @function
     * @memberof A
     * @description Prints 'Ball'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */
}
4
  • This is a good solution, and more directly answers my question than my own answer. Thanks for taking the time to answer!
    – kdbanman
    Jun 8, 2017 at 1:19
  • Good solution. But I'm wondering how can this be done easier for a lot of dynamically generated methods. Can be tedious to write them all. Apr 17, 2018 at 19:46
  • I ended up using a script that outputs docs to another .js file based on some logic I had. Then I used the jsdoc command for both the main target file, and the generated file. Worked out pretty fine for my case of over 30 dynamically generated methods. Apr 17, 2018 at 21:04
  • @keshav.bahadoor It is hard to tell without seeing your code, but if you can dynamically generate the methods and the documentation (they are doing the same thing?) maybe you should consider to not generate 30 methods at all.
    – Peter
    May 4, 2018 at 15:26
1

After a day of trawling the docs, this is the best option I can find. It requires a slightly different equivalent definition of A, and a change to registerPrinter. It's slightly more verbose, but the maintainability benefits of not repeating very similar methods are preserved, and it's more readable:

var A = function () {

    var generatePrinter = function (name) {
        return function (N) {
            var i = 0;
            while (i < N) {
                console.log(name);
                i++;
            }
        };
    };

    /**
     * Prints 'Thing'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */
    this.printThing = generatePrinter('Thing');

    /**
     * Prints 'Ball'
     * @param {Number} N - The number of times to print.
     */
    this.printBall = generatePrinter('Ball');
}

Note that this is no longer dynamically adding the properties printThing or printBall to this (though the methods are still dynamically generated). Hence, this isn't a direct solution to the question - it's a work around. I will accept any future answer that actually documents dynamically added properties.

0

Why not just document the code that is written?

var A = function() {

  var me = this;

  /**
   * [function description]
   * @param  {[type]} name [description]
   * @return {[type]}      [description]
   */
  var registerPrinter = function(name) {

    /**
     * [function description]
     * @param  {[type]} N [description]
     * @return {[type]}   [description]
     */
    me['print' + name] = function(N) {
      var i = 0;
      while (i < N) {
        console.log(name);
        i++;
      }
    };
  };

  registerPrinter('Thing');
  registerPrinter('Ball');
};
1
  • Thanks for the response. registerPrinter is private within the scope of the constructor function. It can (and should) be documented, but it's just used internally. I want to document the resulting public interface of A instances. Sorry that wasn't clear - I'll note this in my question.
    – kdbanman
    Mar 16, 2016 at 18:49

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