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I saw the examples of how to do change point analysis with pymc3, but it seems that I'm missing something because the results I get are far from true values. Here's a toy example.

Data:

toy data

Script:

from pymc3 import *
from numpy.random import uniform, normal

bp_u = 30 #switch point
c_u = [1, -1] #intercepts before and after switch point
beta_u = [0, -0.02]  #slopes before & after switch point

x = uniform(0,90, 200)

y = (x < bp_u)*(c_u[0]+beta_u[0]*x) + (x >= bp_u)*(c_u[1]+beta_u[1]*x) + normal(0,0.1,200)

with Model() as sw_model:

    sigma = HalfCauchy('sigma', beta=10, testval=1.)

    switchpoint = Uniform('switchpoint', lower=x.min(), upper=x.max(), testval=45)

    # Priors for pre- and post-switch intercepts and slopes
    intercept_u1 = Uniform('Intercept_u1', lower=-10, upper=10)
    intercept_u2 = Uniform('Intercept_u2', lower=-10, upper=10)
    x_coeff_u1 = Normal('x_u1', 0, sd=20)
    x_coeff_u2 = Normal('x_u2', 0, sd=20)

    intercept = switch(switchpoint < x, intercept_u1, intercept_u2)
    x_coeff = switch(switchpoint < x, x_coeff_u1, x_coeff_u2)

    likelihood = Normal('y', mu=intercept + x_coeff * x, sd=sigma, observed=y)

    start = find_MAP() 

with sw_model:
    step1 = NUTS([intercept_u1, intercept_u2, x_coeff_u1, x_coeff_u2])
    step2 = NUTS([switchpoint])

    trace = sample(2000, step=[step1, step2], start=start, progressbar=True)

And here are the results:

segmented regression results

As you can see, they are quite different from the initial values. What did I do wrong?

5
  • If you set sigma to a small, fixed number (e.g., 0.01), you'll get results that are reasonable. I don't actually understand why the code isn't able to determine this on its own.
    – inversion
    Mar 18, 2016 at 0:55
  • This is what I get with setting sigma=0.01. imgur.com/2Q6TsNJ
    – inversion
    Mar 18, 2016 at 1:18
  • Thanks! That helps. But in the end I switched to discrete breaking point with Metropolis sampling, that also greatly increases the speed and accuracy. Mar 20, 2016 at 14:07
  • 1
    If you are open to an R solution, this can be modeled in the mcp package using fit = mcp(list(y ~ 1, ~ 1 + x), data). Plot the posteriors and traces with plot_pars(fit). Jan 10, 2020 at 9:17
  • @JonasLindeløv, thanks, I don't really need it anymore but it's good to know about the R solution Jan 11, 2020 at 10:35

1 Answer 1

10

In the end it seems that switching to discrete breaking point with Metropolis sampling resolves the issue. Here's the final model:

with Model() as sw_model:

    sigma = HalfCauchy('sigma', beta=10, testval=1.)

    switchpoint = DiscreteUniform('switchpoint', lower=0, upper=90, testval=45)

    # Priors for pre- and post-switch intercepts and slopes
    intercept_u1 = Uniform('Intercept_u1', lower=-10, upper=10, testval = 0)
    intercept_u2 = Uniform('Intercept_u2', lower=-10, upper=10, testval = 0)
    x_coeff_u1 = Normal('x_u1', 0, sd=20)
    x_coeff_u2 = Normal('x_u2', 0, sd=20)

    intercept = switch(switchpoint < x, intercept_u1, intercept_u2)
    x_coeff = switch(switchpoint < x, x_coeff_u1, x_coeff_u2)

    likelihood = Normal('y', mu=intercept + x_coeff * x, sd=sigma, observed=y)

    start = find_MAP() 

    step1 = NUTS([intercept_u1, intercept_u2, x_coeff_u1, x_coeff_u2])
    step2 = Metropolis([switchpoint])

    trace = sample(20000, step=[step1, step2], start=start, njobs=4,progressbar=True)

the traceplot

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  • 2
    From memory, NUTS assumes continuity (and differentiability?) of likelihood function: a breakpoint introduces a discontinuity and hence Metropolis works but NUTS does not.
    – carlosayam
    May 21, 2018 at 18:38
  • Thanks for posting and following-up on this. I am wondering if you can update this to see how you can post the results with the latest build of pymc3 and az.plot_trace and return_inferencedata=True
    – John Stud
    Mar 2, 2021 at 22:28

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