9

The following code is a textbook example of a recursive variadic function overload. In both clang and GCC, it compiles cleanly, and main returns 36 (as expected):

template <typename T>
int add(T val)
{
    return val;
}

template <typename FirstTypeT, typename... RestT>
int add(FirstTypeT first_value, RestT... rest)
{
    return first_value + add<RestT...>(rest...);
}

int main(void)
{
    return add(12, 12, 12);
}

However, here is a slight modification. It uses a dependent type in the template definition instead of the template parameter directly:

struct Foo
{
    using SomeType = int;
};

template <typename T>
int add(typename T::SomeType val)
{
    return val;
}

template <typename FirstT, typename... RestT>
int add(typename FirstT::SomeType first_value, typename RestT::SomeType... rest)
{
    return first_value + add<RestT...>(rest...);
}

int main(void)
{
    return add<Foo, Foo, Foo>(12, 12, 12);
}

It compiles and runs as intended using GCC 5.2, but fails using clang 3.8:

clang++ variadic.cpp -o var -std=c++11 -Wall
variadic.cpp:15:26: error: call to 'add' is ambiguous
    return first_value + add<RestT...>(rest...);
                         ^~~~~~~~~~~~~
variadic.cpp:15:26: note: in instantiation of function template specialization 'add<Foo, Foo>' requested here
    return first_value + add<RestT...>(rest...);
                         ^
variadic.cpp:20:12: note: in instantiation of function template specialization 'add<Foo, Foo, Foo>' requested here
    return add<Foo, Foo, Foo>(12, 12, 12);
           ^
variadic.cpp:7:5: note: candidate function [with T = Foo]
int add(typename T::SomeType val)
    ^
variadic.cpp:13:5: note: candidate function [with FirstT = Foo, RestT = <>]
int add(typename FirstT::SomeType first_value, typename RestT::SomeType... rest)
    ^
1 error generated.

My question is twofold.

  1. Is it really a valid use of a parameter pack typename pattern to apply the scope resolution operator to each member of the pack as in typename RestT::SomeType... ?
  2. Is clang correct vis-à-vis the standard, or is this a bug? Is the second example really any more ambiguous than the first? (For the first example, it seems like you could say that the single argument overload is ambiguous with the the second instantiated with RestT = <>)
  • 1
    MSVC15 compiles both samples. Clang is the odd one out here, but I don't have a standard reference cite to say who is correct and who is wrong. – Niall Mar 17 '16 at 7:29
  • 2
    Based on this defect (CWG1395), I think this is a clang bug. I can't find anything on why the embedded type would make a difference. – Niall Mar 17 '16 at 7:50
  • 1
    Partial ordering is tricky here since everything is in a non-deduced context. – T.C. Mar 17 '16 at 9:19
  • @T.C. No, that makes it much easier, because all those pairs are ignored due to CWG 1391. – Columbo Mar 17 '16 at 22:31
7
  1. Yes, that's fine.
  2. Current wording is quite clear on this: The parameter pack is completely ignored during partial ordering, because there are no arguments for it ([temp.deduct.partial]/(3.1)). [temp.func.order]/5 also gives a very on point example, even with deducible template arguments - indicating that your first example is also ambiguous:

    [ Note: Since partial ordering in a call context considers only parameters for which there are explicit call arguments, some parameters are ignored (namely, function parameter packs, parameters with default arguments, and ellipsis parameters). [...] [ Example:

    template<class T, class... U> void f(T, U ...);  // #1
    template<class T            > void f(T       );  // #2
    
    void h(int i) {
      f(&i); // error: ambiguous
      // [...]
    }
    

    However, this is not optimal. There is core issue 1395 on variadic template partial ordering:

    CWG agreed that the example should be accepted, handling this case as a late tiebreaker, preferring an omitted parameter over a parameter pack.

    (Issue 1825 gives a more refined strategy.) Both compilers implement this rule for the first case; Only GCC does for the second one (i.e. can be considered half a step ahead).

  • Hmm, I guess that clang implements the direction of 1395 too since it's ok with the deduced context case. Perhaps the difference is that it doesn't implement 1391? – T.C. Mar 17 '16 at 22:38
  • @T.C. 1391's resolution is controversial and probably bad. It not being implemented is justified. – Columbo Mar 17 '16 at 22:49
  • Thanks for your answer, that's exactly what I was looking for. I will probably file a bug with Clang, since it seems like they intend to implement 1395 (given for example this bug report llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=14372) – Bobby Moretti Mar 18 '16 at 1:35
0

The error message has already shown the reason.

When generate add(12), there are two available template functions. That's

template <typename T>
int add(typename T::SomeType val);

and

template <typename FirstT, typename... RestT>
int add(typename FirstT::SomeType first_value, typename RestT::SomeType... rest);
// and RestT is empty here(RestT = <>)

This is not a standard usage and clang is correct.

Consider this code.

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>

struct Foo
{
    using SomeType = int;
};

// helper function to sum a tuple of any size
template<typename Tuple, std::size_t N>
struct TupleSum {
    typedef typename std::tuple_element<N - 1, Tuple>::type ref_t;
    typedef typename std::remove_reference<ref_t>::type noref_t;

    static noref_t sum(const Tuple& t) 
    {
        return std::get<N - 1>(t) + TupleSum<Tuple, N - 1>::sum(t);
    }
};

template<typename Tuple>
struct TupleSum<Tuple, 1> {
    typedef typename std::tuple_element<0, Tuple>::type ref_t;
    typedef typename std::remove_reference<ref_t>::type noref_t;

    static noref_t sum(const Tuple& t) 
    {
        return std::get<0>(t);
    }
};

template <typename... RestT>
int add(typename RestT::SomeType... rest) {
    typedef decltype(std::forward_as_tuple(rest...)) tuple_t;
    return TupleSum<tuple_t, sizeof...(RestT) >::sum(std::forward_as_tuple(rest...));
}

int main(void)
{
    return add<Foo, Foo, Foo>(12, 12, 12);
}
  • 1
    Thanks for the reply. Of course the error message explains the supposed issue. But as I mentioned in the question, why is the second example ambiguous and the first not in that case? And why does GCC accept it? – Bobby Moretti Mar 17 '16 at 6:43
  • Ok, after reading your edit, it looks like you think it's a GCC bug. But the same apparent ambiguous overload occurs in the first example (and many other examples of variadic functions). So is that invalid as well? – Bobby Moretti Mar 17 '16 at 7:01
  • 1
    Sorry, I misunderstand your question. I read N2242 and N2555 just now and found nothing. The two samples also works in MSVC 14. but I think it's still a deprecated way to do that because std::integer_sequence in c++14 is invented as a tool to solve similar problems. – owent Mar 17 '16 at 7:44

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