385

I've created this script to calculate the date for 10 days in advance in the format of dd/mm/yyyy:

var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString = new Date();
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate()+10);
MyDateString = MyDate.getDate() + '/' + (MyDate.getMonth()+1) + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();

I need to have the date appear with leading zeroes on the day and month component by way of adding these rules to the script. I can't seem to get it to work.

if (MyDate.getMonth < 10)getMonth = '0' + getMonth;

and

if (MyDate.getDate <10)get.Date = '0' + getDate;

If someone could show me where to insert these into the script I would be really appreciative.

  • 5
    As a good convention, you should lowercase the first character in your variable names and reserve camel casing for objects/prototypes. – zykadelic Jan 16 '14 at 18:46
  • If the YYYY-MM-DD format is acceptable, this would be a very good answer: stackoverflow.com/a/28431880/1717535 – Fabien Snauwaert Jul 4 '17 at 7:49

22 Answers 22

1234

Try this: http://jsfiddle.net/xA5B7/

var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString;

MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate() + 20);

MyDateString = ('0' + MyDate.getDate()).slice(-2) + '/'
             + ('0' + (MyDate.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2) + '/'
             + MyDate.getFullYear();

EDIT:

To explain, .slice(-2) gives us the last two characters of the string.

So no matter what, we can add "0" to the day or month, and just ask for the last two since those are always the two we want.

So if the MyDate.getMonth() returns 9, it will be:

("0" + "9") // Giving us "09"

so adding .slice(-2) on that gives us the last two characters which is:

("0" + "9").slice(-2)
"09"

But if MyDate.getMonth() returns 10, it will be:

("0" + "10") // Giving us "010"

so adding .slice(-2) gives us the last two characters, or:

("0" + "10").slice(-2)
"10"
  • 24
    Forked - date format YYYY-MM-DD jsfiddle.net/j6qJp/1 It may be useful for somebody. Thanks – tomexx Oct 31 '12 at 13:59
  • 3
    Can someone explain why this is better than the answer that @Aleross provides below? It is not immediately clear what it does versus the pad function which is explicitly clear. – claudio Oct 29 '13 at 20:37
  • 2
    Not to mention that today this example gave me 26/06/2014 instead of 06/06/2014 – DazManCat Jun 6 '14 at 10:50
  • 3
    @DazManCat: That's what it is supposed to do. The code starts by adding 20 days to the current date. MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate() + 20); – cookie monster Jul 25 '14 at 16:45
  • 3
    @n00b and @Phil Cooper, without getting hung up on a discussion about the ins and outs of timing JavaScript routines, I found that the slice() technique in the accepted answer is about a 1/10 of a second faster than @Aleross 's pad() technique on 1 million iterations. jsFiddle. "pay your money, take your pick". – Karl Nov 26 '15 at 14:32
97

Here is an example from the Date object docs on the Mozilla Developer Network using a custom "pad" function, without having to extend Javascript's Number prototype. The handy function they give as an example is

function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n}

And below is it being used in context.

/* use a function for the exact format desired... */
function ISODateString(d){
    function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n}
    return d.getUTCFullYear()+'-'
    + pad(d.getUTCMonth()+1)+'-'
    + pad(d.getUTCDate())+'T'
    + pad(d.getUTCHours())+':'
    + pad(d.getUTCMinutes())+':'
    + pad(d.getUTCSeconds())+'Z'
}

var d = new Date();
console.log(ISODateString(d)); // prints something like 2009-09-28T19:03:12Z
  • 3
    Very nice way of doing it. I think the accepted answer is really nice, but this even cleaner in my opinion – Binke Jan 19 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    this could lead to unexpected bugs cause it outputs a string for < 10 and a number for >= 10 – David Fregoli Jun 23 '17 at 10:26
  • @DavidFregoli, all those date to string functions return a string, so if you input a string, pad does output only strings. – Rohmer Dec 3 '17 at 23:52
41

You can define a "str_pad" function (as in php):

function str_pad(n) {
    return String("00" + n).slice(-2);
}
23

The new modern way to do this is to use toLocaleDateString, because it not just allows you to format a date with proper localization, you can even pass format options to archive the desired outcome:

var date = new Date(2018, 2, 1);
var result = date.toLocaleDateString("en-GB", { // you can skip the first argument
  year: "numeric",
  month: "2-digit",
  day: "2-digit",
});
console.log(result);

When you skip the first argument it will detect the browser language, instead. Additionally, you can use 2-digit on the year option, too.

If you don't need to support old browsers like IE10, this is the cleanest way to do the job. IE10 and lower versions won't understand the options argument.

  • 2
    This is exactly what I was looking for, thanks. More info about the options available for toLocaleDateString here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – JoseLinares Jul 25 '18 at 9:24
  • 1
    @JoseLinares Hi, thanks for putting this link back in the days. I just decided to improve my answer to make the solution more appealing for common scenarios, since you can skip the first argument and IE10 is not relevant anymore. With that in mind, I included your link into my answer. – modiX Apr 12 at 9:09
  • @modiX, sorry it was a my mistake in code and i took wrong way the description, Yes the locales (first variable) is Optional. – Kanhaiya lal Jul 3 at 11:13
  • @Kanhaiyalal Don't worry, mistakes can happen. I was only surprised that 2 of the 3 reviewers approved the wrong edit, too. – modiX Jul 3 at 11:47
20

For you people from the future (ECMAScript 2017 and beyond)

Solution

"use strict"

const today = new Date()

const year = today.getFullYear()

const month = `${today.getMonth() + 1}`.padStart(2, 0)

const day = `${today.getDate()}`.padStart(2, 0)

const stringDate = [day, month, year].join("/") // 13/12/2017

Explaination

the String.prototype.padStart(targetLength[, padString]) adds as many as possible padString in the String.prototype target so that the new length of the target is targetLength.

Example

"use strict"

let month = "9"

month = month.padStart(2, 0) // "09"

let byte = "00000100"

byte = byte.padStart(8, 0) // "00000100"
  • 3
    This is part of ES2017 or ES8. So it's incorrect to say "ES6+" as it's not part of ES6 and ES7. – dashmug Jan 8 '18 at 1:43
  • 2
    "people from the future", love it!!!! Hahahahaha. – Tim Harker Nov 6 '18 at 23:05
11
Number.prototype.padZero= function(len){
 var s= String(this), c= '0';
 len= len || 2;
 while(s.length < len) s= c + s;
 return s;
}

//in use:

(function(){
 var myDate= new Date(), myDateString;
 myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate()+10);

 myDateString= [myDate.getDate().padZero(),
 (myDate.getMonth()+1).padZero(),
 myDate.getFullYear()].join('/');

 alert(myDateString);
})()

/*  value: (String)
09/09/2010
*/
7
var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString = '';
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate());
var tempoMonth = (MyDate.getMonth()+1);
var tempoDate = (MyDate.getDate());
if (tempoMonth < 10) tempoMonth = '0' + tempoMonth;
if (tempoDate < 10) tempoDate = '0' + tempoDate;
MyDateString = tempoDate + '/' + tempoMonth + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();
6

I found the shorterst way to do this:

 MyDateString.replace(/(^|\D)(\d)(?!\d)/g, '$10$2');

will add leading zeros to all lonely, single digits

  • I like this solution, can you maybe clarifiy a bit what happens there? – Gobliins Aug 8 at 10:19
3

You could use ternary operator to format the date like an "if" statement.

For example:

var MyDate = new Date();
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate()+10);
var MyDateString = (MyDate.getDate() < 10 ? '0' + MyDate.getDate() : MyDate.getDate()) + '/' + ((d.getMonth()+1) < 10 ? '0' + (d.getMonth()+1) : (d.getMonth()+1)) + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();

So

(MyDate.getDate() < 10 ? '0' + MyDate.getDate() : MyDate.getDate())

would be similar to an if statement, where if the getDate() returns a value less than 10, then return a '0' + the Date, or else return the date if greater than 10 (since we do not need to add the leading 0). Same for the month.

Edit: Forgot that getMonth starts with 0, so added the +1 to account for it. Of course you could also just say d.getMonth() < 9 :, but I figured using the +1 would help make it easier to understand.

3

Make your life easier and use Moment.js some sample code:

var beginDateTime = moment()
  .format('DD-MM-YYYY HH:mm')
  .toString();

// Now will print 30-06-2015 17:55
console.log(beginDateTime);
  • 3
    moment.js -> not a good solution bcos its 19.8k of code compared to the 0.3k sized solutions here. – MarcoZen Jul 4 '16 at 15:28
3
function formatDate(jsDate){
  // add leading zeroes to jsDate when days or months are < 10.. 
  // i.e.
  //     formatDate(new Date("1/3/2013")); 
  // returns
  //    "01/03/2103"
  ////////////////////
  return (jsDate.getDate()<10?("0"+jsDate.getDate()):jsDate.getDate()) + "/" + 
      ((jsDate.getMonth()+1)<10?("0"+(jsDate.getMonth()+1)):(jsDate.getMonth()+1)) + "/" + 
      jsDate.getFullYear();
}
2

I wrapped the correct answer of this question in a function that can add multiple leading zero's but defaults to adding 1 zero.

function zeroFill(nr, depth){
  depth = (depth === undefined)? 1 : depth;

  var zero = "0";
  for (var i = 0; i < depth; ++i) {
    zero += "0";
  }

  return (zero + nr).slice(-(depth + 1));
}

for working with numbers only and not more than 2 digits, this is also an approach:

function zeroFill(i) {
    return (i < 10 ? '0' : '') + i
  }
2

You can provide options as a parameter to format date. First parameter is for locale which you might not need and second is for options. For more info visit https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date/toLocaleDateString

var date = new Date(Date.UTC(2012, 1, 1, 3, 0, 0));
var options = { year: 'numeric', month: '2-digit', day: '2-digit' };
console.log(date.toLocaleDateString(undefined,options));
  • 1
    Thank you for suggestions. – MJ55 Mar 9 at 15:08
1

Another option, using a built-in function to do the padding (but resulting in quite long code!):

myDateString = myDate.getDate().toLocaleString('en-US', {minimumIntegerDigits: 2})
  + '/' + (myDate.getMonth()+1).toLocaleString('en-US', {minimumIntegerDigits: 2})
  + '/' + myDate.getFullYear();

// '12/06/2017'

And another, manipulating strings with regular expressions:

var myDateString = myDate.toISOString().replace(/T.*/, '').replace(/-/g, '/');

// '2017/06/12'

But be aware that one will show the year at the start and the day at the end.

  • liked this the most : myDate.getDate().toLocaleString('en-US', {minimumIntegerDigits: 2}) – Max Alexander Hanna Dec 5 '18 at 22:14
1

There is another approach to solve this problem, using slice in JavaScript.

var d = new Date();
var datestring = d.getFullYear() + "-" + ("0"+(d.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2) +"-"+("0" + d.getDate()).slice(-2);

the datestring return date with format as you expect: 2019-09-01

another approach is using dateformat library: https://github.com/felixge/node-dateformat

  • Take care in spelling "JavaScript". – Basil Bourque Sep 2 at 4:59
0

The following aims to extract configuration, hook into Date.protoype and apply configuration.

I've used an Array to store time chunks and when I push() this as a Date object, it returns me the length to iterate. When I'm done, I can use join on the return value.

This seems to work pretty fast: 0.016ms

// Date protoype
Date.prototype.formatTime = function (options) {
    var i = 0,
        time = [],
        len = time.push(this.getHours(), this.getMinutes(), this.getSeconds());

    for (; i < len; i += 1) {
        var tick = time[i];
        time[i] = tick < 10 ? options.pad + tick : tick;
    }

    return time.join(options.separator);
};

// Setup output
var cfg = {
    fieldClock: "#fieldClock",
    options: {
        pad: "0",
        separator: ":",
        tick: 1000
    }
};

// Define functionality
function startTime() {
    var clock = $(cfg.fieldClock),
        now = new Date().formatTime(cfg.options);

    clock.val(now);
    setTimeout(startTime, cfg.options.tick);
}

// Run once
startTime();

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/tive/U4MZ3/

0

What I would do, is create my own custom Date helper that looks like this :

var DateHelper = {
    addDays : function(aDate, numberOfDays) {
        aDate.setDate(aDate.getDate() + numberOfDays); // Add numberOfDays
        return aDate;                                  // Return the date
    },
    format : function format(date) {
        return [
           ("0" + date.getDate()).slice(-2),           // Get day and pad it with zeroes
           ("0" + (date.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2),      // Get month and pad it with zeroes
           date.getFullYear()                          // Get full year
        ].join('/');                                   // Glue the pieces together
    }
}

// With this helper, you can now just use one line of readable code to :
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
// 1. Get the current date
// 2. Add 20 days
// 3. Format it
// 4. Output it
// ---------------------------------------------------------------------
document.body.innerHTML = DateHelper.format(DateHelper.addDays(new Date(), 20));

(see also this Fiddle)

0

Add some padding to allow a leading zero - where needed - and concatenate using your delimiter of choice as string.

Number.prototype.padLeft = function(base,chr){
        var  len = (String(base || 10).length - String(this).length)+1;
        return len > 0? new Array(len).join(chr || '0')+this : this;
    }

var d = new Date(my_date);
var dformatted = [(d.getMonth()+1).padLeft(), d.getDate().padLeft(), d.getFullYear()].join('/');
0

As @John Henckel suggests, starting using the toISOString() method makes things easier

const dateString = new Date().toISOString().split('-');
const year = dateString[0];
const month = dateString[1];
const day = dateString[2].split('T')[0];

console.log(`${year}-${month}-${day}`);

0

Adding on to @modiX answer, this is what works...DO NOT LEAVE THAT as empty

today.toLocaleDateString("default", {year: "numeric", month: "2-digit", day: "2-digit"})
0
 let date = new Date();
 let dd = date.getDate();//day of month

 let mm = date.getMonth();// month
 let yyyy = date.getFullYear();//day of week
 if (dd < 10) {//if less then 10 add a leading zero
     dd = "0" + dd;
   }
 if (mm < 10) {
    mm = "0" + mm;//if less then 10 add a leading zero
  }
  • you can also describe in short what you attempt. – Shiv Kumar Baghel May 16 at 0:12
0

try this for a basic function, no libraries required

Date.prototype.CustomformatDate = function() {
 var tmp = new Date(this.valueOf());
 var mm = tmp.getMonth() + 1;
 if (mm < 10) mm = "0" + mm;
 var dd = tmp.getDate();
 if (dd < 10) dd = "0" + dd;
 return mm + "/" + dd + "/" + tmp.getFullYear();
};

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