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This question already has an answer here:

I've got a question: I have several cases that I think about implementing with a switch/case.

My code would look somewhat like this:

switch( X)
{
  case 1:
    flag = true ;
        if ( flag ==true)
        {...}
        if ( flag ==false)
        {...}
    break ;

  case 2 :
    flag = true ;
        if ( flag ==true)
        {...}
        if ( flag ==false)
        {...}
    break ;

  case 3 :
    flag = true ;
        if ( flag ==true)
        {...}
        if ( flag ==false)
        {...}
    break ;
}

Can I put several conditions into the switch like that ?

switch( X & flag)
{
  case ( 1 && flag ==true):
    {...}
    break;

  case ( 1 && flag ==false):
    {...}
    break;

  case ( 2 && flag ==true):
    {...}
    break;

  case ( 2 && flag ==false):
    {...}
    break;

  case ( 3 && flag ==true):
    {...}
    break;

  case (3 && flag ==false):
    {...}
    break;
}

marked as duplicate by Richard Hodges c++ Mar 17 '16 at 8:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • No you can't do that, it's just not how the language works or was designed. Depending on the size of the switch you could use an if statement to check for the flag, and have two switch statements depending on the result, should make the cases much simpler at least. – Some programmer dude Mar 17 '16 at 8:08
  • 4
    flag is always true in your first code, so no reason to use an if-statement. – huysentruitw Mar 17 '16 at 8:10
  • what's the range of X ? – huysentruitw Mar 17 '16 at 8:12
  • 1
    No, but considering that the flag variable must have the same value in all cases, I'd put the entire switch statement inside a if block that checks the flag variable first. Better, put also the switch statement in another function so the code is more clear. – Jepessen Mar 17 '16 at 8:15
  • and it's better to use boolean expressions like if (flag), if (!flag) instead of if (flag == true), if (flag == false). – phuclv Mar 17 '16 at 8:20
2

The short answer is No!

But since you want to use different types of conditional statements sometimes it is better to rewrite your code if you want it to look nicer:

if(flag)
{ 
  switch (X)
  {
    ...
  }
}
else
{
  switch (X)
  {
    ...
  }
}
  • 1
    IMO it's more error-prone if you add a case (easier to forget the else). – Ilya Mar 17 '16 at 8:28
4

We don't know the range or variable type of X, so this answer may or may not suite your needs.

Say X is a unsigned int and the range of X doesn't need the MSB, you could put the flag in the MSB before passing the value to the switch-statement:

#define FLAG 0x80000000

unsigned int value = X | (flag ? FLAG : 0);

switch (value)
{
case 1:
    break;
case 1 | FLAG:
    break;
}
  • Faster than I am ;) I think you should point out that 1 | FLAG in this context actually means value == 1 && flag, it is not obvious for people not familiar with bitwise operations I guess... – Holt Mar 17 '16 at 8:21
  • @Holt maybe for readability case 1 + FLAG: would be better. Or the OP could use an enum and give meaningful names to the different values. – huysentruitw Mar 17 '16 at 8:42
1

You could use an associative container which stores (key, function) pairs instead of the switch statement. It would be a little bit slower, but then you can use arbitrary keys.

void f(int X, bool flag)
{
    auto case1 = []() { ... };
    auto case2 = []() { ... };
    auto case3 = []() { ... };

    static const std::unordered_map< std::pair<int, bool>, std::function<void()>> select{
        { {0, true}, case1 },
        { {0, false}, case2 },
        { {42, true}, case3 },
        ...
    };

    auto const c = select.find( std::make_pair(x,flag) );
    if (c != select.end())
    {
        c->second();
    }
    else
    {
        // default case
    }
}

Another alternative would be to name the cases (x,flag) with an enum and define a function mapping them.

enum class Cases {
    case1True,
    case2True,
    case1False,
    ...
}
Cases whichCase(int x, bool flag) {
    return case based on x and flag
}

switch (whichCase(x,flag))
{
case Cases::case1True:
case Cases::case1False:
...
}

Of course this would benefit from better names.

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