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is there a way to count the number of commits in certain period (e.g. the last year from 2015-03-01 to 2016-03-01) for git (GitHub) repositories?

2 Answers 2

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To count the commits in a date range in your current branch do this:

 git rev-list --count HEAD --since="Dec 3 2015"  --before="Jan 3 2016"

If you want the count for all branches in one go use --all additionally

git rev-list --count --since="Dec 3 2015"  --before="Jan 3 2016" --all

if you want to exclude merge-commits, use option --no-merges

git rev-list --count --since="Dec 3 2015"  --before="Jan 3 2016" --all --no-merges
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  • 2
    per branch, please? PS. Got it: --branches[=<pattern>] Aug 30, 2019 at 17:07
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You can get total number of commits through a time period with two different ways:

First way

Get the total commit by using [second - minute - hour - day - week - month - year]

Get the total commits by second

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=600.second

Get the total commits by minute

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=30.minute

Get the total commits by hour

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=3.hour

Get the total commits by day

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=28.day

Get the total commits by week

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=4.week

Get the total commits by month

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=1.month

Get the total commits by year

git rev-list --count HEAD  --since=1.year

Second way

Using since and before - since take the start date and before take the end date that you want to get commit from it.

git rev-list --count HEAD --since="Dec 1 2021"  --before="Jan 3 2022"

You can get all commits by selecting the branch name:

git rev-list --count master --since="Dec 1 2021"  --before="Jan 3 2022"
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  • How could I filter the commit messages? eg. I want the metrics for commits with a message that contains a common string Dec 9, 2022 at 15:43
  • You will use grep with log git log --oneline |grep -i "put_string_here" , you will put pattern between double quotation, -i for ignore case sensitive. Dec 9, 2022 at 16:11

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