10

Consider this output:

int foo (int, char) {std::cout << "foo\n";  return 0;}
double bar (bool, double, long ) {std::cout << "bar\n";  return 3.5;}
bool baz (char, short, float) {std::cout << "baz\n";  return true;}

int main() {
    const auto tuple = std::make_tuple(5, 'a', true, 3.5, 1000, 't', 2, 5.8);
    multiFunction<2,3,3> (tuple, foo, bar, baz);  // foo  bar  baz
}

So multiFunction<2,3,3> takes the first 2 elements of tuple and passes them to foo, the next 3 elements of tuple and passes them to bar, etc... I got this working (except when the functions have overloads, which is a separate problem). But the return values of each function called are lost. I want those return values stored somewhere, something like

std::tuple<int, double, bool> result = multiFunction<2,3,3> (tuple, foo, bar, baz);

But I don't know how to implement that. For those who want to help get this done, here is my (updated) working code so far, which stores the outputs into a stringstream only. Not easy to get all the values back, especially if the objects saved in the stream are complex classes.

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>
#include <sstream>

template <std::size_t N, typename Tuple>
struct TupleHead {
    static auto get (const Tuple& tuple) {  // The subtuple from the first N components of tuple.
        return std::tuple_cat (TupleHead<N-1, Tuple>::get(tuple), std::make_tuple(std::get<N-1>(tuple)));
    }
};

template <typename Tuple>
struct TupleHead<0, Tuple> {
    static auto get (const Tuple&) { return std::tuple<>{}; }
};

template <std::size_t N, typename Tuple>
struct TupleTail {
    static auto get (const Tuple& tuple) {  // The subtuple from the last N components of tuple.
        return std::tuple_cat (std::make_tuple(std::get<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value - N>(tuple)), TupleTail<N-1, Tuple>::get(tuple));
    }
};

template <typename Tuple>
struct TupleTail<0, Tuple> {
    static auto get (const Tuple&) { return std::tuple<>{}; }
};

template <typename Tuple, typename F, std::size_t... Is>
auto functionOnTupleHelper (const Tuple& tuple, F f, const std::index_sequence<Is...>&) {
    return f(std::get<Is>(tuple)...);
}

template <typename Tuple, typename F>
auto functionOnTuple (const Tuple& tuple, F f) {
    return functionOnTupleHelper (tuple, f, std::make_index_sequence<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value>{});
}

template <typename Tuple, typename... Functions> struct MultiFunction;

template <typename Tuple, typename F, typename... Fs>
struct MultiFunction<Tuple, F, Fs...> {
    template <std::size_t I, std::size_t... Is>
    static inline auto execute (const Tuple& tuple, std::ostringstream& oss, const std::index_sequence<I, Is...>&, F f, Fs... fs) {
        const auto headTuple = TupleHead<I, Tuple>::get(tuple);
        const auto tailTuple = TupleTail<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value - I, Tuple>::get(tuple);
    //  functionOnTuple (headTuple, f);  // Always works, though return type is lost.
        oss << std::boolalpha << functionOnTuple (headTuple, f) << '\n';  // What about return types that are void???
        return MultiFunction<std::remove_const_t<decltype(tailTuple)>, Fs...>::execute (tailTuple, oss, std::index_sequence<Is...>{}, fs...);
    }
};

template <>
struct MultiFunction<std::tuple<>> {
    static auto execute (const std::tuple<>&, std::ostringstream& oss, std::index_sequence<>) {  // End of recursion.
        std::cout << std::boolalpha << oss.str();
        // Convert 'oss' into the desired tuple?  But how?
        return std::tuple<int, double, bool>();  // This line is just to make the test compile.
    }
};

template <std::size_t... Is, typename Tuple, typename... Fs>
auto multiFunction (const Tuple& tuple, Fs... fs) {
    std::ostringstream oss;
    return MultiFunction<Tuple, Fs...>::execute (tuple, oss, std::index_sequence<Is...>{}, fs...);
}

// Testing
template <typename T> int foo (int, char) {std::cout << "foo<T>\n";  return 0;}
double bar (bool, double, long ) {std::cout << "bar\n";  return 3.5;}
template <int...> bool baz (char, short, float) {std::cout << "baz<int...>\n";  return true;}

int main() {
    const auto tuple = std::make_tuple(5, 'a', true, 3.5, 1000, 't', 2, 5.8);
    std::tuple<int, double, bool> result = multiFunction<2,3,3> (tuple, foo<bool>, bar, baz<2,5,1>);  // foo<T>  bar  baz<int...>
}
5
  • 2
    Just change functionOnTuple to return a single-element tuple. For void, return a tuple<> (or perhaps tuple<this_function_returns_void_t>). Then you can just tuple_cat them together. Obviously this isn't the most efficient, but neither is the rest of your code.
    – T.C.
    Mar 18 '16 at 15:56
  • The solutions to the problem are interesting and informative, but I'm struggling to understand the problem to which a 'multicall' is the most elegant solution. It seems a little... unmaintainable? Mar 18 '16 at 20:04
  • @Richard Hodges Just another level of indirection that may come in handy one day.
    – prestokeys
    Mar 18 '16 at 20:12
  • @ T.C. Thanks for your advice. I modified my solution using your ideas and posted it. All the return values are now stored (including void) in the desired tuple.
    – prestokeys
    Mar 19 '16 at 2:40
  • You might by interested in this problem solution Mar 19 '16 at 14:44
7

Here's an approach where the number of arguments is deduced greedily:

#include <tuple>

namespace detail {
    using namespace std;
    template <size_t, size_t... Is, typename Arg>
    constexpr auto call(index_sequence<Is...>, Arg&&) {return tuple<>{};}

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is, typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
    constexpr auto call(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&&, Fs&&...);

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is,
              typename ArgT, typename F, typename... Fs,
              typename=decltype(declval<F>()(get<offset+Is>(declval<ArgT>())...))>
    constexpr auto call(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&& argt, F&& f, Fs&&... fs) {
        return tuple_cat(make_tuple(f(get<offset+I>(forward<ArgT>(argt))...)),
                         call<offset+sizeof...(Is)>(index_sequence<>{},
                                                    forward<ArgT>(argt),
                                                    forward<Fs>(fs)...));}

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is, typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
    constexpr auto call(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&& argt, Fs&&... fs) {
        return call<offset>(index_sequence<Is..., sizeof...(Is)>{},
                            forward<ArgT>(argt), forward<Fs>(fs)...);}
}
template <typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
constexpr auto multifunction(ArgT&& argt, Fs&&... fs) {
    return detail::call<0>(std::index_sequence<>{},
                           std::forward<ArgT>(argt), std::forward<Fs>(fs)...);}

Demo. However, the above has quadratic time complexity in the number of return values, because tuple_cat is called recursively. Instead, we can use a slightly modified version of call to obtain the indices for each call - the actual tuple is then obtained directly:

#include <tuple>

namespace detail {
    using namespace std;
    template <size_t, size_t... Is, typename Arg>
    constexpr auto indices(index_sequence<Is...>, Arg&&) {return tuple<>{};}

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is, typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
    constexpr auto indices(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&&, Fs&&...);

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is, typename ArgT, typename F, class... Fs,
             typename=decltype(declval<F>()(get<offset+Is>(declval<ArgT>())...))>
    constexpr auto indices(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&& argt, F&& f, Fs&&... fs){
        return tuple_cat(make_tuple(index_sequence<offset+Is...>{}),
                         indices<offset+sizeof...(Is)>(index_sequence<>{},
                                                       forward<ArgT>(argt),
                                                       forward<Fs>(fs)...));}

    template <size_t offset, size_t... Is, typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
    constexpr auto indices(index_sequence<Is...>, ArgT&& argt, Fs&&... fs) {
        return indices<offset>(index_sequence<Is..., sizeof...(Is)>{},
                            forward<ArgT>(argt), forward<Fs>(fs)...);}

    template <typename Arg, typename F, size_t... Is>
    constexpr auto apply(Arg&& a, F&& f, index_sequence<Is...>) {
        return f(get<Is>(a)...);}

    template <typename ITuple, typename Args, size_t... Is, typename... Fs>
    constexpr auto apply_all(Args&& args, index_sequence<Is...>, Fs&&... fs) {
        return make_tuple(apply(forward<Args>(args), forward<Fs>(fs),
                          tuple_element_t<Is, ITuple>{})...);
    }
}

template <typename ArgT, typename... Fs>
constexpr auto multifunction(ArgT&& argt, Fs&&... fs) {
    return detail::apply_all<decltype(detail::indices<0>(std::index_sequence<>{},
                                                         std::forward<ArgT>(argt),
                                                         std::forward<Fs>(fs)...))>
             (std::forward<ArgT>(argt), std::index_sequence_for<Fs...>{},
              std::forward<Fs>(fs)...);}

Demo 2.

8
  • 3
    Yes! No horizontal scroll bar!
    – Columbo
    Mar 18 '16 at 16:19
  • Yes, you always give the shortest solution. But GCC 5.2 complains of invalid rvalue initialization (minor thing).
    – prestokeys
    Mar 18 '16 at 16:22
  • @Columbo So not using the passed in indices is apparently simpler than actually using them. That's amazing.
    – Barry
    Mar 18 '16 at 16:29
  • @prestokeys Yep. Just wrap them in a lambda: [] (auto&&... args) -> decltype(foo(std::forward<decltype(args)>(args)...)) {return foo(std::forward<decltype(args)>(args)...);}
    – Columbo
    Mar 18 '16 at 16:31
  • @Columbo Could you test if that works by giving foo an explicit overload?
    – prestokeys
    Mar 18 '16 at 16:33
4

Building from the ground up and ignoring perfect forwarding so that I have to type less. We need a couple helpers. First, we need a partial version of apply that takes which indices from the tuple we want to apply to the function:

<class Tuple, class F, size_t... Is>
auto partial_apply(Tuple tuple, F f, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
    return f(get<Is>(tuple)...);
}

Then, we need to call that function for each subset of the tuple. Let's say we have all of our functions and indexes wrapped in a tuple already:

template <class Tuple, class FsTuple, class IsTuple, size_t... Is>
auto multi_apply(Tuple tuple, FsTuple fs, IsTuple indexes, std::index_sequence<Is...>) {
    return std::make_tuple(
        partial_apply(tuple,
            std::get<Is>(fs),
            std::get<Is>(indexes)
            )...
        );
}

So in this case, we'd want to end up calling multi_apply(tuple, <foo,bar,baz>, <<0,1>,<2,3,4>,<5,6,7>>, <0, 1, 2>).

All we need know is to build the indexes part. We're starting with <2,3,3>. We need to get the partial sums (<0,2,5>) and add that to the index sequences <<0,1>,<0,1,2>,<0,1,2>>. So we can write a partial sum function:

template <size_t I>
using size_t_ = std::integral_constant<size_t, I>;

template <class R, size_t N>
R partial_sum_(std::index_sequence<>, R, size_t_<N> ) {
    return R{};
}

template <size_t I, size_t... Is, size_t... Js, size_t S>
auto partial_sum_(std::index_sequence<I, Is...>,
        std::index_sequence<Js...>, size_t_<S> )
{
    return partial_sum_(std::index_sequence<Is...>{},
        std::index_sequence<Js..., S>{}, size_t_<S+I>{} );
}

template <size_t... Is>
auto partial_sum_(std::index_sequence<Is...> is)
{
    return partial_sum_(is, std::index_sequence<>{}, size_t_<0>{} );
};

Which we can use to generate all of our indexes as a tuple:

template <size_t... Is, size_t N>
auto increment(std::index_sequence<Is...>, size_t_<N> )
{
    return std::index_sequence<Is+N...>{};
}

template <class... Seqs, size_t... Ns>
auto make_all_indexes(std::index_sequence<Ns...>, Seqs... seqs)
{
    return std::make_tuple(increment(seqs, size_t_<Ns>{})...);
}

Like so:

template <size_t... Is, class Tuple, class... Fs>
auto multiFunction(Tuple tuple, Fs... fs)
{
    static_assert(sizeof...(Is) == sizeof...(Fs));
    return multi_apply(tuple,
        std::make_tuple(fs...),
        make_all_indexes(
            partial_sum_(std::index_sequence<Is...>{}),
            std::make_index_sequence<Is>{}...
            ),
        std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(Is)>{}
        );

}

If you want to handle void returns, then just make partial_apply return a tuple of a single element (or an empty tuple) and change the make_tuple() usage in multi_apply to tuple_cat().

4
  • @ Barry I wrote another solution which I think follows your line of thinking, using partial sums: ideone.com/Rl8KKo We both use std::make_tuple in the final return line, but std::make_tuple apparently outputs the values in the correct order but calls the functions in the reverse order.
    – prestokeys
    Mar 19 '16 at 22:49
  • @prestokeys Order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified.
    – Barry
    Mar 19 '16 at 22:55
  • @ Barry You're right. I forgot to specify that. The functions should be read from left to right in this program (could be vital). I don't see how the implementation of std::make_tuple ends up calling the functions in reverse order though. Looks like we have to write up our own make_tuple function to ensure left-to-rightness of the functions.
    – prestokeys
    Mar 19 '16 at 22:59
  • @prestokeys Because order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified. You'd have to change make_tuple(f(x)...) to tuple<decltype(f(x))...>{f(x)...}
    – Barry
    Mar 19 '16 at 23:25
2

Here's yet another impl:

template<std::size_t N>
constexpr Array<std::size_t, N> scan(std::size_t const (&a)[N])
{
    Array<std::size_t, N> b{};
    for (int i = 0; i != N - 1; ++i)
        b[i + 1] = a[i] + b[i];
    return b;
}

template<std::size_t O, std::size_t... N, class F, class Tuple>
inline decltype(auto) eval_from(std::index_sequence<N...>, F f, Tuple&& t)
{
    return f(std::get<N + O>(std::forward<Tuple>(t))...);
}

template<std::size_t... O, std::size_t... N, class Tuple, class... F>
inline auto multi_function_impl1(std::index_sequence<O...>, std::index_sequence<N...>, Tuple&& t, F... f)
{
    return pack(eval_from<O>(std::make_index_sequence<N>(), f, std::forward<Tuple>(t))...);
}

template<std::size_t... I, std::size_t... N, class Tuple, class... F>
inline auto multi_function_impl0(std::index_sequence<I...>, std::index_sequence<N...>, Tuple&& t, F... f)
{
    constexpr std::size_t ns[] = {N...};
    constexpr auto offsets = scan(ns);
    return multi_function_impl1(std::index_sequence<offsets[I]...>(), std::index_sequence<N...>(), std::forward<Tuple>(t), f...);
}

template<std::size_t... N, class Tuple, class... F>
auto multi_function(Tuple&& t, F... f)
{
    return multi_function_impl0(std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(N)>(), std::index_sequence<N...>(), std::forward<Tuple>(t), f...);
}

where pack and Array are similar to std::make_tuple and std::array respectively, but to overcome some problems:

  • std::make_tuple decays it args, so references are lost
  • std::array cannot have its elems written in constexpr in c++14

DEMO

2

Here's my solution after following T.C.'s advice, adding to my previous (albeit inefficient) solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>

struct NoReturnValue {
    friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& os, const NoReturnValue&) {
        return os << "[no value returned]";
    }
};

template <std::size_t N, typename Tuple>
struct TupleHead {
    static auto get (const Tuple& tuple) {  // The subtuple from the first N components of tuple.
        return std::tuple_cat (TupleHead<N-1, Tuple>::get(tuple), std::make_tuple(std::get<N-1>(tuple)));
    }
};

template <typename Tuple>
struct TupleHead<0, Tuple> {
    static auto get (const Tuple&) { return std::tuple<>{}; }
};

template <std::size_t N, typename Tuple>
struct TupleTail {
    static auto get (const Tuple& tuple) {  // The subtuple from the last N components of tuple.
        return std::tuple_cat (std::make_tuple(std::get<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value - N>(tuple)), TupleTail<N-1, Tuple>::get(tuple));
    }
};

template <typename Tuple>
struct TupleTail<0, Tuple> {
    static auto get (const Tuple&) { return std::tuple<>{}; }
};

template <typename Tuple, typename F, std::size_t... Is>
auto functionOnTupleHelper (const Tuple& tuple, F f, const std::index_sequence<Is...>&,
        std::enable_if_t< !std::is_void<std::result_of_t<F(std::tuple_element_t<Is, Tuple>...)>>::value >* = nullptr) {  // This overload is called only if f's return type is not void.
    return std::make_tuple(f(std::get<Is>(tuple)...));  // Thanks to T.C.'s advice on returning a single tuple and then calling std::tuple_cat on all the single tuples.
}

template <typename Tuple, typename F, std::size_t... Is>
auto functionOnTupleHelper (const Tuple& tuple, F f, const std::index_sequence<Is...>&,
        std::enable_if_t< std::is_void<std::result_of_t<F(std::tuple_element_t<Is, Tuple>...)>>::value >* = nullptr) {  // This overload is called only if f's return type is void.
    f(std::get<Is>(tuple)...);
    return std::tuple<NoReturnValue>();  // Thanks to T.C.'s advice on returning std::tuple<NoReturnValue>() if the return type of 'f' is void.
}

template <typename Tuple, typename F>
auto functionOnTuple (const Tuple& tuple, F f) {
    return functionOnTupleHelper (tuple, f, std::make_index_sequence<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value>{});
}

template <typename Tuple, typename... Functions> struct MultiFunction;

template <typename Tuple, typename F, typename... Fs>
struct MultiFunction<Tuple, F, Fs...> {
    template <std::size_t I, std::size_t... Is>
    static inline auto execute (const Tuple& tuple, const std::index_sequence<I, Is...>&, F f, Fs... fs) {
        const auto headTuple = TupleHead<I, Tuple>::get(tuple);
        const auto tailTuple = TupleTail<std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value - I, Tuple>::get(tuple);
        const auto r = functionOnTuple(headTuple, f);  // Which overload of 'functionOnTupleHelper' is called dedends on whether f's return type is void or not.
        return std::tuple_cat (r, MultiFunction<std::remove_const_t<decltype(tailTuple)>, Fs...>::execute (tailTuple, std::index_sequence<Is...>{}, fs...));  // T.C.'s idea of tuple_cat with all the single return tuples.
    }
};

template <>
struct MultiFunction<std::tuple<>> {
    static auto execute (const std::tuple<>&, std::index_sequence<>) { return std::tuple<>(); }
};

template <std::size_t... Is, typename Tuple, typename... Fs>
auto multiFunction (const Tuple& tuple, Fs... fs) {
    return MultiFunction<Tuple, Fs...>::execute (tuple, std::index_sequence<Is...>{}, fs...);
}

// Testing
template <typename T> int foo (int, char) {std::cout << "foo<T>\n";  return 0;}
double bar (bool, double, long) {std::cout << "bar\n";  return 3.5;}
double bar (bool, int) {return 1.4;}
void voidFunction() {std::cout << "voidFunction\n";}
template <int...> bool baz (char, short, float) {std::cout << "baz<int...>\n";  return true;}

int main() {
    const auto tuple = std::make_tuple(5, 'a', true, 3.5, 1000, 't', 2, 5.8);
    const auto firstBar = [](bool b, double d, long l) {return bar(b, d, l);};
    const auto t = multiFunction<2,3,0,3> (tuple, foo<bool>, firstBar, voidFunction, baz<2,5,1>);  // Note that since 'bar' has an overload, we have to define 'firstBar' to indicate which 'bar' function we want to use.
    std::cout << std::boolalpha << std::get<0>(t) << ' ' << std::get<1>(t) << ' ' << std::get<2>(t) << ' ' << std::get<3>(t) << '\n';
    // 0 3.5 [no value returned] true
}
2

This solution should have linear time complexity. It uses std::tie instead of std::make_tuple, so neither the functions nor the arguments are copied unnecessarily. I think it should be fairly easy to follow compared to some other answers here.

First, we need a utility to invoke a function using a std::tuple of arguments.

template <typename F, typename Args, std::size_t... Is>
auto invoke_impl(F const& f, Args const& args, std::index_sequence<Is...>)
{
    return f(std::get<Is>(args)...);
}

template <typename F, typename Args>
auto invoke(F const& f, Args const& args)
{
    return invoke_impl(f, args, std::make_index_sequence<std::tuple_size<Args>::value>());
}

Secondly, we need a utility to std::tie a sub-range of tuple elements.

template <std::size_t Offset, typename Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
auto sub_tie_impl(Tuple const& tuple, std::index_sequence<Is...>)
{
    return std::tie(std::get<Offset + Is>(tuple)...);
}

template <std::size_t Offset, std::size_t Count, typename Tuple>
auto sub_tie(Tuple const& tuple)
{
    return sub_tie_impl<Offset>(tuple, std::make_index_sequence<Count>());
}

Now we can create our utility to consume a std::tuple of arguments using a sequence of functions.

First we std::tie the functions into a tuple, then we split the argument list into a parameter pack of sub-argument lists, and finally we invoke a function for each sub-argument list, packing the results into a tuple which we then return.

template <typename Fs, std::size_t... Is, typename... SubArgs>
auto consume_impl(Fs const& fs, std::index_sequence<Is...>, SubArgs const&... sub_args)
{
    return std::make_tuple(invoke(std::get<Is>(fs), sub_args)...);
}

template <std::size_t, typename Args, typename Fs, typename... SubArgs>
auto consume_impl(Args const&, Fs const& fs, SubArgs const&... sub_args)
{
    return consume_impl(fs, std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(SubArgs)>(), sub_args...);
}

template <std::size_t Offset, std::size_t Count, std::size_t... Counts,
          typename Args, typename Fs, typename... SubArgs>
auto consume_impl(Args const& args, Fs const& fs, SubArgs const&... sub_args)
{
    return consume_impl<Offset + Count, Counts...>(args, fs, sub_args...,
                                                   sub_tie<Offset, Count>(args));
}

template <std::size_t... Counts, typename Args, typename... Fs>
auto consume(Args const& args, Fs const&... fs)
{
    return consume_impl<0, Counts...>(args, std::tie(fs...));
}
0

Here's another solution borrowing Barry's partial_apply idea but avoiding the use of his partial_sum function altogether. It is shorter as a result. I think this is linear in time complexity.

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <utility>

template <std::size_t Offset, typename F, typename Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
auto partial_apply_impl (F f, const Tuple& tuple, const std::index_sequence<Is...>&) {
    return f(std::get<Offset + Is>(tuple)...);
}

template <typename Off, typename F, typename Tuple>  // Off must be of type OffsetIndexSequence<A,B> only.
auto partial_apply (F f, const Tuple& tuple) {
    return partial_apply_impl<Off::value>(f, tuple, typename Off::sequence{});
}

template <std::size_t Offset, std::size_t Size>
struct OffsetIndexSequence : std::integral_constant<std::size_t, Offset> {
    using sequence = std::make_index_sequence<Size>;
};

template <typename Output, std::size_t... Is> struct OffsetIndexSequenceBuilder;

template <template <typename...> class P, typename... Out, std::size_t Offset, std::size_t First, std::size_t... Rest>
struct OffsetIndexSequenceBuilder<P<Out...>, Offset, First, Rest...> :
    OffsetIndexSequenceBuilder<P<Out..., OffsetIndexSequence<Offset, First>>, Offset + First, Rest...> {};

template <template <typename...> class P, typename... Out, std::size_t Offset>
struct OffsetIndexSequenceBuilder<P<Out...>, Offset> {
    using type = P<Out...>;
};

template <std::size_t... Is>
using offset_index_sequences = typename OffsetIndexSequenceBuilder<std::tuple<>, 0, Is...>::type;

template <typename> struct MultiFunction;

template <template <typename...> class P, typename... Offs>
struct MultiFunction<P<Offs...>> {
    template <typename ArgsTuple, typename... Fs>
    static auto execute (const ArgsTuple& argsTuple, Fs... fs) {
        using ResultTuple = std::tuple<decltype(partial_apply<Offs>(fs, argsTuple))...>;
        return ResultTuple{partial_apply<Offs>(fs, argsTuple)...};
    }
};

template <std::size_t... Is, typename ArgsTuple, typename... Fs>
auto multiFunction (const ArgsTuple& argsTuple, Fs... fs) {
    return MultiFunction<offset_index_sequences<Is...>>::execute(argsTuple, fs...);
}

// Testing
int foo (int, char) {std::cout << "foo\n";  return 0;}
double bar (bool, double, long) {std::cout << "bar\n";  return 3.5;}
bool baz (char, short, float) {std::cout << "baz\n";  return true;}

int main() {
    const auto tuple = std::make_tuple(5, 'a', true, 3.5, 1000, 't', 2, 5.8);
    const std::tuple<int, double, bool> t = multiFunction<2,3,3> (tuple, foo, bar, baz);  // foo   bar   baz
    std::cout << std::boolalpha << std::get<0>(t) << ' ' << std::get<1>(t) << ' ' << std::get<2>(t) << '\n';  // 0 3.5 true
}

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