17

I am trying to figure out the right approach to use SQLAlchemy scoped sessions the "right way" while keeping the logic of defining a session separate from configuration and separate from using the session. I have been told a number of times a good aproeach would be to have some global scoped_session factory where I can use everywhere:

"""myapp/db.py
"""

from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker, scoped_session

Session = scoped_session(sessionmaker())

Then when I want to use it:

"""myapp/service/dosomething.py
"""

from myapp.db import Session

def do_something(data): 
    """Do something with data
    """
    session = Session()
    bars = session.query(Bar).all()
    for bar in bars:
        bar.data = data
    session.commit()

This seems right, but my problem is that in all examples I have seen, sessionmaker would also set some parameters of the session, namely and most importantly bind an engine. This makes no sense to me, as the actual DB engine will be created from configuration not known at the global scope during the import of the myapp.db module.

What I have looked at doing is to set everything up in my app's "main" (or in a thread's main function), and then just assume that the session is configured in other places (such as when used by do_something() above):

"""myapp/main.py
"""

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from myapp.db import Session
from myapp.service.dosomething import do_something

def main(): 
    config = load_config_from_file()
    engine = create_engine(**config['db'])
    Session.configure(bind=engine)

    do_something(['foo', 'bar'])

Does this seem like a correct approach? I have not found any good examples of such a flow yet most other examples I find seem either over-simplified or framework specific.

2
  • Why is the configuration not known at the global scope during the import of myapp.db? Why can't you load the config at the module level and create the engine at the module level?
    – univerio
    Commented Mar 18, 2016 at 18:54
  • In any case it won't be in the db module level - configuration is shared by many services of the app so it makes no sense to do that, plus it would make things very rigid and make testing difficult. If it is not in the db module I don't think it helps - I would be happy to see a counter example though
    – shevron
    Commented Mar 19, 2016 at 6:47

3 Answers 3

21

This is old and I've never accepted any of the answers below, but flowing @univerio's comment and 3+ years of continued usage in SQLAlchemy in various projects, my selected approach now is to keep doing exactly what I suggested in the OP:

  1. Create a myapp.db module which defines Session = ScopedSession(sessionmaker())
  2. Import from myapp.db import Session everywhere it is needed
  3. In my app's main or in the relevant initialization code, do:
def main(): 
     config = load_config_from_file()
     engine = create_engine(**config['db'])
     Session.configure(bind=engine)

     do_something(['foo', 'bar'])

I've used this pattern successfully in Web apps, command line tools and long-running backend processes, and never had to change it so far. Ot is simple, reusable and works great, and I'd recommend it to anyone stumbling here because they've asked themselves the same question I did 3 years ago.

3
  • 2
    Why isn't this clear in the Sqlalchemy docs from the beginning? I've struggled with this a couple of times throughout the year but I still find myself googling the "best practice" every single time... Thanks for sharing bro!
    – speakman
    Commented May 14, 2020 at 9:58
  • 2
    A little bit off-topic maybe, but; writing Python for many years and meanwhile testing out a few other languages and frameworks, C#/.Net for example, Python looks really messy with even the most basic parts unclear while other frameworks has it's "shit" in place such as Service Discovery for shared singletons (database is a common one).
    – speakman
    Commented May 14, 2020 at 10:05
  • @speakman SQLAlchemy's documentation is controversial even within the Python community. Commented Feb 13 at 4:10
1

What you can do is to separate the config out into a separate module:

"""myapp/cfg.py
"""
config = load_config_from_file()

Then you can import this file wherever you need, including in the db module, so you can construct the engine as well as the session:

"""myapp/db.py
"""
from .cfg import config
engine = create_engine(**config['db'])
Session = scoped_session(sessionmaker(bind=engine))
2
  • Well, this feels like its only deferring the real problem which is managing the state global module variables - only now my issue is with cfg.config rather than the DB session. In my "main", I would like config to be loaded from a file who's path is set by argparse; But in testing, I would like to provide some hand-crafted mock config to the DB factory and other services. How do I achieve that now? I know this is a common pattern in Python, but it feels more like an anti-pattern.
    – shevron
    Commented Mar 20, 2016 at 17:00
  • 1
    @shevron In that case what you're doing is fine. Alternatively, you can make the engine initialization lazy, so that the engine is only created the first time you want to create a session, e.g. Session = scoped_session(lambda: sqlalchemy.orm.session.Session(bind=get_engine())). This way, in your main, you only have to set cfg.config to be a different set of config for testing.
    – univerio
    Commented Mar 20, 2016 at 23:47
1

Think about singleton. In your case from myapp.db import Session, Session is singleton and global. Just config Session at the start in your application. You should have a config process like load config data from file or env, after all configs are ready, run the real program.

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