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How would I go about generating a list of all possible permutations of a string between x and y characters in length, containing a variable list of characters.

Any language would work, but it should be portable.

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36 Answers 36

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0

The pythonic solution:

from itertools import permutations
s = 'ABCDEF'
p = [''.join(x) for x in permutations(s)]
0

Well here is an elegant, non-recursive, O(n!) solution:

public static StringBuilder[] permutations(String s) {
        if (s.length() == 0)
            return null;
        int length = fact(s.length());
        StringBuilder[] sb = new StringBuilder[length];
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            sb[i] = new StringBuilder();
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
            char ch = s.charAt(i);
            int times = length / (i + 1);
            for (int j = 0; j < times; j++) {
                for (int k = 0; k < length / times; k++) {
                    sb[j * length / times + k].insert(k, ch);
                }
            }
        }
        return sb;
    }
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Recursive Solution with driver main() method.

public class AllPermutationsOfString {
public static void stringPermutations(String newstring, String remaining) {
    if(remaining.length()==0)
        System.out.println(newstring);

    for(int i=0; i<remaining.length(); i++) {
        String newRemaining = remaining.replaceFirst(remaining.charAt(i)+"", "");
        stringPermutations(newstring+remaining.charAt(i), newRemaining);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String string = "abc";
    AllPermutationsOfString.stringPermutations("", string); 
}

}

0

A recursive solution in python. The good thing about this code is that it exports a dictionary, with keys as strings and all possible permutations as values. All possible string lengths are included, so in effect, you are creating a superset.

If you only require the final permutations, you can delete other keys from the dictionary.

In this code, the dictionary of permutations is global.

At the base case, I store the value as both possibilities in a list. perms['ab'] = ['ab','ba'].

For higher string lengths, the function refers to lower string lengths and incorporates the previously calculated permutations.

The function does two things:

  • calls itself with a smaller string
  • returns a list of permutations of a particular string if already available. If returned to itself, these will be used to append to the character and create newer permutations.

Expensive for memory.

perms = {}
def perm(input_string):
    global perms
    if input_string in perms:
        return perms[input_string] # This will send a list of all permutations
    elif len(input_string) == 2:
        perms[input_string] = [input_string, input_string[-1] + input_string [-2]]
        return perms[input_string]
    else:
        perms[input_string] = []
        for index in range(0, len(input_string)):
            new_string = input_string[0:index] + input_string[index +1:]
            perm(new_string)
            for entries in perms[new_string]:
                perms[input_string].append(input_string[index] + entries)
    return perms[input_string]
0

code written for java language :

package namo.algorithms;

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Permuations {

public static int totalPermutationsCount = 0;
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("input string : ");
        String inputString = sc.nextLine();
        System.out.println("given input String ==> "+inputString+ " :: length is = "+inputString.length());
        findPermuationsOfString(-1, inputString);
        System.out.println("**************************************");
        System.out.println("total permutation strings ==> "+totalPermutationsCount);
    }


    public  static void findPermuationsOfString(int fixedIndex, String inputString) {
        int currentIndex = fixedIndex +1;

        for (int i = currentIndex; i < inputString.length(); i++) {
            //swap elements and call the findPermuationsOfString()

            char[] carr = inputString.toCharArray();
            char tmp = carr[currentIndex];
            carr[currentIndex] = carr[i];
            carr[i] = tmp;
            inputString =  new String(carr);

            //System.out.println("chat At : current String ==> "+inputString.charAt(currentIndex));
            if(currentIndex == inputString.length()-1) {
                totalPermutationsCount++;
                System.out.println("permuation string ==> "+inputString);
            } else {
                //System.out.println("in else block>>>>");
                findPermuationsOfString(currentIndex, inputString);
                 char[] rarr = inputString.toCharArray();
                    char rtmp = carr[i];
                    carr[i] = carr[currentIndex];
                    carr[currentIndex] = rtmp;
                    inputString =  new String(carr);
            }
        }
    }

}

-1

The possible string permutations can be computed using recursive function. Below is one of the possible solution.

public static String insertCharAt(String s, int index, char c) {
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(s);
        StringBuffer sbb = sb.insert(index, c);
        return sbb.toString();
}

public static ArrayList<String> getPerm(String s, int index) {
        ArrayList<String> perm = new ArrayList<String>();

        if (index == s.length()-1) {
            perm.add(String.valueOf(s.charAt(index)));
            return perm;
        }

        ArrayList<String> p = getPerm(s, index+1);
        char c = s.charAt(index);

        for(String pp : p) {
            for (int idx=0; idx<pp.length()+1; idx++) {
                String ss = insertCharAt(pp, idx, c);
                perm.add(ss);
            }
        }

        return perm;    
}

public static void testGetPerm(String s) {
        ArrayList<String> perm = getPerm(s,0);
        System.out.println(s+" --> total permutation are :: "+perm.size());
        System.out.println(perm.toString());
}
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