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Here is the common solution to prevent multiple requests during Ajax action.

let isRequesting = false

$('#fetch').on('click', () => {
    if(isRequesting) {
        console.log('ajax still in progress, please wait')
        return false
    }

    isRequesting = true

    $.get(SOME_RESOURCE, (data) => {
        console.log('success with :', data)
        isRequesting = false
    })
})

But how can I finish this work without changing any states in my app, just like functional programs do.

  • Personally I'd usually disable the button/link at the start of the click event, and enable it at the end of the success / failure callback. This is clearer to users in most cases. – Obversity Mar 19 '16 at 11:12
  • The goal in FP is to eliminate unnecessary state, and to manage necessary state in a reasonable way. In this particular scenario, you're dealing with necessary state--you want your code to function differently depending on whether it's in a "ready" state or a "loading" state. – MarkNFI Mar 22 '16 at 11:47
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You can't do it without keeping state, but you can make it prettier by encapsulating the state in a generic component. For example:

(function($){
    $.fn.extend({
        smartOn: (type, funcHandler) => {
            return this.each(function() {
                let $me = $(this);
                let isRequesting = false;
                $me.on(type, () => {
                    if (isRequesting) {
                        console.log('ajax still in progress, please wait');
                        return false;
                    }

                    isRequesting = true

                    funcHandler(() => {
                        isRequesting = false;
                    });
                });
            });
        }
    });
})(jQuery);

And then call it like this:

$('#fetch').smartOn("click", (callbackDone) => {
    $.get(SOME_RESOURCE, (data) => {
        console.log('success with :', data)
        callbackDone();
    })
});

Just remember to call callbackDone() in every scenario (i.e. also if $.get fails). Also, if you use Promises instead of callbacks it may make it a little nicer-looking (especially the need to handle every scenario with $.get).

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