11

I'd like to group some of my Vue.js methods together in a sort of "submethod" class, but I only seem to be able to have single level methods.

For example, if I wanted to have a set of methods dealing purely with button actions:

new Vue({

    el: '#app',

    data: { },

    methods: {

        buttonHandlers: {

            handler1: function() {
                dosomething;
            },

            handler2: function() {
                dosomething;
            }

        }

    }

});

I would expect to be able to then use something like:

<button v-on:click="buttonHandlers.handler1">Click Me</button>

but nothing happens.

I have tried forcing the function to run by adding brackets:

<button v-on:click="buttonHandlers.handler1()">Click Me</button>

but I receive this console error:

Uncaught TypeError: scope.buttonHandlers.handler1 is not a function

I've setup a small https://jsfiddle.net/ozx9oc4c/ to demonstrate what I mean.

If anyone knows of a way to logically group functions under parent methods in Vue.js, rather than pages and pages of single level methods with no real structure, I'd be grateful for your knowledge.

4
  • 2
    If you have pages and pages of methods, chances are you should be building smaller components. Your button should be its own component, most likely.
    – ceejayoz
    Mar 20 '16 at 0:37
  • @ceejayoz Totally agreed - In this instance, I'm actually working a multi-step form and a lot of the methods are to do with validation, step progression, field manipulation etc, so I'd like to keep them within a single Vue instance if possible, but grouped into logical classes; this button example I've given is the quickest relevant sample I could think of. Mar 20 '16 at 0:41
  • 1
  • Weird how now in 2020 Vue team is trying to group related options (methods/computeds) together (composition API) but something that lets you group related methods together is not accepted Mar 27 '20 at 8:50
11

The closest I've got to doing this, is to declare the parent as a function, and return an object with a set of methods.

Example:

new Vue({

  el: '#app',

  data: {},

  methods: {

    buttonHandlers: function() {
      var self = this; // so you can access the Vue instance below.

      return {

        handler1: function() {
          dosomething;
          self.doSomething();
        },

        handler2: function() {
          dosomething;
        },

      },

    }

  }

});

And you can call the methods like this:

<button @click="buttonHandlers().handler1()">Click Me</button>
3
  • I have been using this answer, for a while, but I now recently found out that you can just use modern syntax to avoid the var self = this. You can write a sub-function like handler1(){} now, which keeps the this context inside that function scope. And generally you don't want to use var any more and use const or let instead to avoid weird variable scoping.
    – DutchJelly
    Dec 10 '20 at 20:57
  • 1
    I cannot edit my message anymore, but I meant handler1: () => {}: an arrow function captures this
    – DutchJelly
    Dec 10 '20 at 21:04
  • I'm not able to make it work on Google Chrome 91. My grouping arrow func is something like grouping_func: () => ({ method1: () => {}, ... }) but inside method1 this points to the grouping_func object.
    – erny
    Jul 21 '21 at 8:28
5

There is actually a very simple technique: define your nested methods in the created hook:

created() {
  this.on = {
    test: () => {console.log(this)}
  }
  this.on.test();
}

NOTE: Two things, A) in this case you must use arrow function(s) and B) if this feels "hacky" to you, perhaps because of the cluttering of the created lifecycle hook, you can always delegate to a method, let's say this.namespaceMethods(), e.g.:

created() {
  this.namespaceMethods();
  // call namespaced methods
  this.foo.bar();
  this.foobar.baz();
  // etc.
},
methods: {
  this.namespaceMethods() {
    this.foo = {
      bar: () => {console.log("foobar")}
    },
    this.foobar = {
      baz: () => {console.log("foobarbaz")}
    }
  },
  // etc
}
1
  • i honestly don't like it, I used an arrow function returning the object inside the methods() but still felt weird so i bumped it to the computed() as an object and i'm semi comfortable. still feels kinda hacky. idk, I like the function returning the object better I guess. I wasn't saying its ugly or wrong, just felt hacky, to me, personally. i meant no offense :) Oct 15 '20 at 18:20
-1

if i had that problem, i would use a click handler() to delegate request to other methods. eg:

new Vue({

    el: '#app',

    data: { },

    methods: {

        handler1: function() {
             console.log("handler 1 called");
        },

        handler2: function() {
            console.log("handler 2 called");
        },

        buttonHandler:function(callback){
            callback();
        }


    }

});

and use html as

<button v-on:click="buttonHandler(handler1)">Click Me</button>

<button v-on:click="buttonHandler(handler2)">Click Me</button>

The code is only for demo. In real life i will be passing a number or string argument in template and using switch case to determine handler.

2
  • 2
    Unfortunately this solution still leaves me in the same position where I end up with 3 functions in the top level of my methods object - there's no logical organisation in a hierarchy. Mar 21 '16 at 11:16
  • hmm, can you elaborate your use case. and also how many methods and logical partitions you are talking about? oh do add info in your post, not in comments here
    – Raj Kamal
    Mar 21 '16 at 11:24
-1

I had the same issue (the need of a namespace) while writing a Vue mixin. This answer doesn't directly address your case, but it could give a clue.

This is how I defined the mixin.

export default {
   created () {
    // How to call the "nested" method
    this.dummy('init')

    // Pass arguments
    this.dummy('greet', {'name': 'John'})
   },

   // Namespaced methods
   methods: {
     dummy (name, conf) {
       // you can access reactive data via `that` reference,
       // from inside your functions
       const that = this

       return {
         'init': function (conf) {
            console.log('dummy plugin init OK')
         },
         'greet': function (conf) {
            console.log('hello, ' + conf['name'])
         }
       }[name](conf)
     }
   }
 }

PS: for an official solution, Evan You said no.

-1

I use this pattern:

Template:

<ExampleComponent
  :test="hello"
  @close="(arg) => example('close')(arg)"
  @play="(arg) => example('next')(arg)"
  @stop="(arg) => example('back')(arg)"/>

Script:

...
methods: {
  test () {
    this.info('open')('test');
  },
  info (arg) {
    console.table({omg: [arg, '!']});
  },
  example (arg) {
    let self = this;
    const methods = {
      open (arg) {self.info(arg);},
      close (arg) { return self.example('play')(arg)},
      play (arg) {console.log(self, this)},
      stop () {console.error('Lo1')},
    };
    if (!Object.keys(methods).includes(arg)) return () => false;
    return methods[arg];
  },
}
...

And second case:

Script:

const fabric = (arg, foo, context) => {
  const methods = foo(context);
  if (!Object.keys(methods).includes(arg)) return () => false;
  return methods[arg];
};

export default {
  ...
  methods: {
    test () {
      this.info('open')('test');
    },
    info (arg) {
      console.table({omg: [arg, '!']});
    },
    example (arg) {
      return fabric(arg, (cnx)=>({
        open (arg) {cnx.info(arg);},
        close (arg) { return cnx.example('play')(arg)},
        play (arg) {console.log(cnx, this)},
        stop () {console.error('Lo1')},
      }), this);
    },
  }
  ...
}

Also, I think this is not a good practice, but it works and makes my work easier.

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