137

Is it possible to iterate a vector from the end to the beginning?

for (vector<my_class>::iterator i = my_vector.end();
        i != my_vector.begin(); /* ?! */ ) {
}

Or is that only possible with something like that:

for (int i = my_vector.size() - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
}
3
  • 3
    In C++11 you can use range-based for-loop with reverse adapter, see here
    – M.M
    Jul 22, 2014 at 13:05
  • 1
    theoretically, on a 32 bit machine, for the second solution, if the vector size is larger than 2,147,483,647 + 1 it will overflow (vector::size() is unsigned), but currently chances are that you will never hit that limit (also current vector limit on 32 bit machines is 1,073,741,823). Dec 22, 2014 at 17:15
  • 2
    @StefanRogin overflow issue becomes real when instead of "int i" in the for loop someone uses size_t (or maybe auto) in their quest to avoid compiler warnings (due to size() assignment to int). With this, and for a single element vector, the second iteration overflows auto i and the loop executes with the overflown "i" resulting in all sorts of crashes. Sep 21, 2020 at 16:10

12 Answers 12

202

One way is:

for (vector<my_class>::reverse_iterator i = my_vector.rbegin(); 
        i != my_vector.rend(); ++i ) { 
} 

rbegin()/rend() were especially designed for that purpose. (And yes, incrementing a reverse_interator moves it backward.)

Now, in theory, your method (using begin()/end() & --i) would work, std::vector's iterator being bidirectional, but remember, end() isn't the last element — it's one beyond the last element, so you'd have to decrement first, and you are done when you reach begin() — but you still have to do your processing.

vector<my_class>::iterator i = my_vector.end();
while (i != my_vector.begin())
{
     --i;
    /*do stuff */

} 

UPDATE: I was apparently too aggressive in re-writing the for() loop into a while() loop. (The important part is that the --i is at the beginning.)

3
  • I just realized that --i will cause a big problem if container is empty... Before going into do - while loop it makes sense to check (my_vector.begin() != my_vector.end()).
    – a1ex07
    Aug 31, 2010 at 18:07
  • 1
    Why are you using a do-while loop instead of just a while loop? Then you wouldn't need any special check for empty vectors.
    – jamesdlin
    Aug 31, 2010 at 18:13
  • 3
    Could you update the answer to use auto for better readability?
    – LNJ
    Aug 7, 2020 at 15:29
86

If you have C++11 you can make use of auto.

for (auto it = my_vector.rbegin(); it != my_vector.rend(); ++it)
{
}
0
37

The well-established "pattern" for reverse-iterating through closed-open ranges looks as follows

// Iterate over [begin, end) range in reverse
for (iterator = end; iterator-- != begin; ) {
  // Process `*iterator`
}

or, if you prefer,

// Iterate over [begin, end) range in reverse
for (iterator = end; iterator != begin; ) {
  --iterator;
  // Process `*iterator`
}

This pattern is useful, for example, for reverse-indexing an array using an unsigned index

int array[N];
...
// Iterate over [0, N) range in reverse
for (unsigned i = N; i-- != 0; ) {
  array[i]; // <- process it
}

(People unfamiliar with this pattern often insist on using signed integer types for array indexing specifically because they incorrectly believe that unsigned types are somehow "unusable" for reverse indexing)

It can be used for iterating over an array using a "sliding pointer" technique

// Iterate over [array, array + N) range in reverse
for (int *p = array + N; p-- != array; ) {
  *p; // <- process it
}

or it can be used for reverse-iteration over a vector using an ordinary (not reverse) iterator

for (vector<my_class>::iterator i = my_vector.end(); i-- != my_vector.begin(); ) {
  *i; // <- process it
}
6
  • cppreference.com says, accessing the element at end() "results in undefined behavior", so I think, the loops should start at --end() Jun 5, 2018 at 7:24
  • 2
    @ThomasSchmid These loops never attempt to access at end(). Even though they seem to start at end(), they always make sure to decrement the iterator before the first access. Jun 5, 2018 at 7:38
  • This is so much nicer then rbegin/rend because you can loop the other way at runtime (no template) auto a = vector<int>{0,1,2}; bool reversed = 0; auto it = (!reversed?a.begin():a.end()); auto end = (reversed?a.begin():a.end()); while(it != end) { if(reversed)--it; cout << *it << endl; if(!reversed)++it; }
    – colin
    Dec 18, 2018 at 8:37
  • 2
    @colin Egads! that ugly!. You are testing reversed four times -- two of them inside a loop. Of course, testing a boolean is very fast, but still, why to work you don't have to? Especially, since the only purpose seems to be to make the code unreadable. how 'bout we use two separate loops? if (reversed) for (auto it = my_vector.rbegin(); it != my_vector.rend(); ++it) {doStuff(*it);} else for (auto it = my_vector.begin(); it != my_vector.end(); ++it) {doStuff(*it);} Jul 16, 2019 at 14:57
  • Actually you missed my point. You are absolutely right to split it into two ifs but I wanted to get rid of the template on the doStuff(). Still doable though with the two ifs you have by looping the other way round on the first one.
    – colin
    Jul 17, 2019 at 15:38
37

Starting with c++20, you can use a std::ranges::reverse_view and a range-based for-loop:

#include<ranges>
#include<vector>
#include<iostream>

using namespace std::ranges;

std::vector<int> const vec{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};

for(auto& i :  views::reverse(vec)) {
    std::cout << i << ",";
}

Or even

for(auto& i :  vec | views::reverse)

Unfortunately, at the time of writing (Jan 2020) no major compiler implements the ranges library, but you can resort to Eric Niebler's ranges-v3:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include "range/v3/all.hpp"

int main() {

    using namespace ranges;

    std::vector<int> const vec{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10};
    for(auto& i :  views::reverse(vec)) {
        std::cout << i << ",";
    }

    return 0;
}
2
  • I am confused with this line for(auto& i : vec | views::reverse). How does it work? What does the | do here?
    – Dino Saric
    Dec 13, 2021 at 22:02
  • 2
    @DinoSaric This is a new feature in C++20 that allows composing operations on ranges. See this tutorial for example: hannes.hauswedell.net/post/2019/11/30/range_intro
    – florestan
    Dec 13, 2021 at 22:18
12

User rend() / rbegin() iterators:

for (vector<myclass>::reverse_iterator it = myvector.rbegin(); it != myvector.rend(); it++)

7

Use reverse iterators and loop from rbegin() to rend()

7
template<class It>
std::reverse_iterator<It> reversed( It it ) {
  return std::reverse_iterator<It>(std::forward<It>(it));
}

Then:

for( auto rit = reversed(data.end()); rit != reversed(data.begin()); ++rit ) {
  std::cout << *rit;

Alternatively in C++14 just do:

for( auto rit = std::rbegin(data); rit != std::rend(data); ++rit ) {
  std::cout << *rit;

In C++03/11 most standard containers have a .rbegin() and .rend() method as well.

Finally, you can write the range adapter backwards as follows:

namespace adl_aux {
  using std::begin; using std::end;
  template<class C>
  decltype( begin( std::declval<C>() ) ) adl_begin( C&& c ) {
    return begin(std::forward<C>(c));
  }
  template<class C>
  decltype( end( std::declval<C>() ) ) adl_end( C&& c ) {
    return end(std::forward<C>(c));
  }
}

template<class It>
struct simple_range {
  It b_, e_;
  simple_range():b_(),e_(){}
  It begin() const { return b_; }
  It end() const { return e_; }
  simple_range( It b, It e ):b_(b), e_(e) {}

  template<class OtherRange>
  simple_range( OtherRange&& o ):
    simple_range(adl_aux::adl_begin(o), adl_aux::adl_end(o))
  {}

  // explicit defaults:
  simple_range( simple_range const& o ) = default;
  simple_range( simple_range && o ) = default;
  simple_range& operator=( simple_range const& o ) = default;
  simple_range& operator=( simple_range && o ) = default;
};
template<class C>
simple_range< decltype( reversed( adl_aux::adl_begin( std::declval<C&>() ) ) ) >
backwards( C&& c ) {
  return { reversed( adl_aux::adl_end(c) ), reversed( adl_aux::adl_begin(c) ) };
}

and now you can do this:

for (auto&& x : backwards(ctnr))
  std::cout << x;

which I think is quite pretty.

2

I like the backwards iterator at the end of Yakk - Adam Nevraumont's answer, but it seemed complicated for what I needed, so I wrote this:

template <class T>
class backwards {
    T& _obj;
public:
    backwards(T &obj) : _obj(obj) {}
    auto begin() {return _obj.rbegin();}
    auto end() {return _obj.rend();}
};

I'm able to take a normal iterator like this:

for (auto &elem : vec) {
    // ... my useful code
}

and change it to this to iterate in reverse:

for (auto &elem : backwards(vec)) {
    // ... my useful code
}
2

If you can use The Boost Library, there is the Boost.Range that provides the reverse range adapter by including:

#include <boost/range/adaptor/reversed.hpp>

Then, in combination with a C++11's range-for loop, you can just write the following:

for (auto& elem: boost::adaptors::reverse(my_vector)) {
   // ...
}

Since this code is briefer than the one using the iterator pair, it may be more readable and less prone to errors as there are fewer details to pay attention to.

1
  • 1
    Indeed, boost::adaptors::reverse is very useful!
    – Kai Petzke
    Sep 14, 2020 at 16:16
1

Here's a super simple implementation that allows use of the for each construct and relies only on C++14 std library:

namespace Details {

    // simple storage of a begin and end iterator
    template<class T>
    struct iterator_range
    {
        T beginning, ending;
        iterator_range(T beginning, T ending) : beginning(beginning), ending(ending) {}

        T begin() const { return beginning; }
        T end() const { return ending; }
    };

}

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// usage:
//  for (auto e : backwards(collection))
template<class T>
auto backwards(T & collection)
{
    using namespace std;
    return Details::iterator_range(rbegin(collection), rend(collection));
}

This works with things that supply an rbegin() and rend(), as well as with static arrays.

std::vector<int> collection{ 5, 9, 15, 22 };
for (auto e : backwards(collection))
    ;

long values[] = { 3, 6, 9, 12 };
for (auto e : backwards(values))
    ;
-1

use this code

//print the vector element in reverse order by normal iterator.
cout <<"print the vector element in reverse order by normal iterator." <<endl;
vector<string>::iterator iter=vec.end();
--iter;
while (iter != vec.begin())
{
    cout << *iter  << " "; 
    --iter;
}
1
  • 2
    This code fails terribly, if vec refers to an empty vector!
    – Kai Petzke
    Sep 14, 2020 at 16:13
-3

As I don't want to introduce alien-like new C++ syntax, and I simply want to build up on existing primitives, the below snippets seems to work:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc,char *argv[])
{
    std::vector<int> arr{1,2,3,4,5};
    std::vector<int>::iterator it;

    // iterate forward
    for (it = arr.begin(); it != arr.end(); it++) {
        std::cout << *it << " ";
    }

    std::cout << "\n************\n";
 
    if (arr.size() > 0) {
        // iterate backward, simple Joe version
        it = arr.end() - 1;
        while (it != arr.begin()) {
            std::cout << *it << " ";
            it--;
        }
        std::cout << *it << " ";
    } 

    // iterate backwards, the C++ way
    std::vector<int>::reverse_iterator rit;
    for (rit = arr.rbegin(); rit != arr.rend(); rit++) {
        std::cout << *rit << " ";
    }

    return 0;
}
1
  • This code fails terribly, if arr refers to an empty vector!
    – Kai Petzke
    Sep 14, 2020 at 16:14

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