171

Have I missed a standard API call that removes trailing insignificant zeros from a number?

Ex.

var x = 1.234000 // to become 1.234;
var y = 1.234001; // stays 1.234001

Number.toFixed() and Number.toPrecision() are not quite what I'm looking for.

  • 6
    Um, 1.234000 === 1.234. – Gumbo Aug 31 '10 at 20:10
  • 5
    Yea, if you do alert(x) it pops up without the trailing zeros – JKirchartz Aug 31 '10 at 20:17
  • 52
    After working with a number of clients, I can testify that even though 1.234000 === 1.234, clients don't want to see those extra zeros if they don't need to. – contactmatt Jan 15 '13 at 16:44
  • 17
    Use parseFloat(n) ? – Mr. Alien Apr 7 '16 at 13:13
  • This was the easiest solution that covered all edge cases for me, thank you @Mr.Alien. – James Perih Oct 1 '18 at 21:26

15 Answers 15

145

If you convert it to a string it will not display any trailing zeros, which aren't stored in the variable in the first place since it was created as a Number, not a String.

var n = 1.245000
var noZeroes = n.toString() // "1.245" 
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I was about to post some code to strip the zeros but Daniel's solution seems to work. It even works for Strings such as "1.2345000". ("1.2345000" * 1).toString(); // becomes 1.2345 – Steven Aug 31 '10 at 21:18
  • 8
    Of course, if your var is already a string you have to convert it to a number first and then back again – derekcohen Jun 27 '11 at 13:03
  • This worked great. I was having the same issue, converted float to string and then parseFloat to get it back in the right format, only without the trailing zeroes. – Matt West Aug 26 '16 at 21:08
  • 10
    This is not complete solution. It doesn't work when you have variable with some floating point representation error, like: var n = 1.245000000000001 (assuming it is insignificant to be represented to user) – augur Jun 8 '17 at 15:04
  • 7
    May produce unexpected results for numbers like: 1231111111111111111111111111111222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222.00. The string representation will be in exponential format: 1.231111111111111e+81 – Stas Makutin Feb 20 '18 at 16:43
249

I had a similar instance where I wanted to use .toFixed() where necessary, but I didn't want the padding when it wasn't. So I ended up using parseFloat in conjunction with toFixed.

toFixed without padding

parseFloat(n.toFixed(4));

Another option that does almost the same thing
This answer may help your decision

Number(n.toFixed(4));

toFixed will round/pad the number to a specific length, but also convert it to a string. Converting that back to a numeric type will not only make the number safer to use arithmetically, but also automatically drop any trailing 0's. For example:

var n = "1.234000";
    n = parseFloat(n);
 // n is 1.234 and in number form

Because even if you define a number with trailing zeros they're dropped.

var n = 1.23000;
 // n == 1.23;
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  • Note that this works only if the relevant number of decimals is equal or greater than the toFixed argument. If the number is for example 1.200000 the result of toFixed(3) will be 1.200 and thus, no all the trailing zeros will be removed. – Leopoldo Sanczyk Nov 16 '15 at 23:37
  • @LeopoldoSanczyk No, that's only true if you're just using toFixed, because it returns a string. Number types automatically lose trailing zeros. That's why I used the two in tandem. – Gary Nov 20 '15 at 2:51
  • @Gary, I withdraw my comment, I have seen parseFloat(n).toFixed(4); instead of the your actual answer. I'm sorry. – Leopoldo Sanczyk Nov 20 '15 at 5:58
  • 3
    Why not +(n.toFixed(4))? – Константин Ван Aug 28 '17 at 3:45
  • 3
    upvoted! only one problem with your answer 0.00000005 gets converted to 5e-8 how can I remove insignificant zeroes without this problem, i am working with small numbers such as 0.000058000 where zeroes at the end need to be removed – PirateApp Dec 12 '18 at 9:32
30

I first used a combination of matti-lyra and gary's answers:

r=(+n).toFixed(4).replace(/\.0+$/,'')

Results:

  • 1234870.98762341: "1234870.9876"
  • 1230009100: "1230009100"
  • 0.0012234: "0.0012"
  • 0.1200234: "0.12"
  • 0.000001231: "0"
  • 0.10001: "0.1000"
  • "asdf": "NaN" (so no runtime error)

The somewhat problematic case is 0.10001. I ended up using this longer version:

    r = (+n).toFixed(4);
    if (r.match(/\./)) {
      r = r.replace(/\.?0+$/, '');
    }
  • 1234870.98762341: "1234870.9876"
  • 1230009100: "1230009100"
  • 0.0012234: "0.0012"
  • 0.1200234: "0.12"
  • 0.000001231: "0"
  • 0.10001: "0.1"
  • "asdf": "NaN" (so no runtime error)

Update: And this is Gary's newer version (see comments):

r=(+n).toFixed(4).replace(/([0-9]+(\.[0-9]+[1-9])?)(\.?0+$)/,'$1')

This gives the same results as above.

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  • 1
    I've got a pure regex solution that I believe works toFixed(4).replace(/([0-9]+(\.[1-9]+)?)(\.?0+$)/,"$1") – Gary Jul 2 '14 at 12:04
  • 1
    Gah! Apparently I'm not nearly as good at breaking my own RegExes than others. I will not let this beat me! I ran this one against all of your test cases plus any (valid) one I could think of ([0-9]+(\.[0-9]+[1-9])?)(\.?0+$) – Gary Jul 3 '14 at 17:09
  • 1
    The regex is to greedy an sometimes removes a "0" from the integer part! :-( Why not just replace(/[,.][1-9]+(0+)/,'')? – Sebastian Sebald Sep 26 '14 at 10:37
  • 2
    Underrated answer this. – Charlie Nov 8 '18 at 11:03
  • 1
    @w00t Oh, sorry, I understand now. I was the way I tested when I made mine (see link above). Yours doesn't fail when you use toFixed, because the number is guaranteed to have a dot, but it was failing in my tests because I wanted the regex to work for any number, including integers with no dot. Without toFixed, it eats a zero at the end. My bad. – geekley Jul 6 '19 at 3:31
22

The toFixed method will do the appropriate rounding if necessary. It will also add trailing zeroes, which is not always ideal.

(4.55555).toFixed(2);
//-> "4.56"

(4).toFixed(2);
//-> "4.00"

If you cast the return value to a number, those trailing zeroes will be dropped. This is a simpler approach than doing your own rounding or truncation math.

+(4.55555).toFixed(2);
//-> 4.56

+(4).toFixed(2);
//-> 4
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    tricky, but exactly what i've been looking for: removing significant trailing zeros (which of course we made significant through the toFixed call). it's a weird UX edge case. – worc Nov 27 '18 at 0:35
13

I had the basically the same requirement, and found that there is no built-in mechanism for this functionality.

In addition to trimming the trailing zeros, I also had the need to round off and format the output for the user's current locale (i.e. 123,456.789).

All of my work on this has been included as prettyFloat.js (MIT Licensed) on GitHub: https://github.com/dperish/prettyFloat.js


Usage Examples:

prettyFloat(1.111001, 3) // "1.111"
prettyFloat(1.111001, 4) // "1.111"
prettyFloat(1.1111001, 5) // "1.1111"
prettyFloat(1234.5678, 2) // "1234.57"
prettyFloat(1234.5678, 2, true) // "1,234.57" (en-us)


Updated - August, 2018


All modern browsers now support the ECMAScript Internationalization API, which provides language sensitive string comparison, number formatting, and date and time formatting.

let formatters = {
    default: new Intl.NumberFormat(),
    currency: new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', { style: 'currency', currency: 'USD', minimumFractionDigits: 0, maximumFractionDigits: 0 }),
    whole: new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', { style: 'decimal', minimumFractionDigits: 0, maximumFractionDigits: 0 }),
    oneDecimal: new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', { style: 'decimal', minimumFractionDigits: 1, maximumFractionDigits: 1 }),
    twoDecimal: new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', { style: 'decimal', minimumFractionDigits: 2, maximumFractionDigits: 2 })
};

formatters.twoDecimal.format(1234.5678);  // result: "1,234.57"
formatters.currency.format(28761232.291); // result: "$28,761,232"

For older browsers, you can use this polyfill: https://cdn.polyfill.io/v2/polyfill.min.js?features=Intl.~locale.en

| improve this answer | |
  • This is what were looking for. You must create an npm package. – EnZo Aug 29 '18 at 14:50
  • So I should probably update this, as this is now possible via the Internationalization API. – dperish Aug 29 '18 at 20:37
  • 2
    This is very helpful, thanks for sharing and thanks for the update as well. – jaggedsoft Sep 7 '18 at 20:10
12

How about just multiplying by one like this?

var x = 1.234000*1; // becomes 1.234

var y = 1.234001*1; // stays as 1.234001
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11

You can try this one to minify floating numbers

var n = 0.0000;
n = parseFloat(n.toString()); 

//output n = 0; 
// n = 3.14000; --> n = 3.14;
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10

Pure regex answer

n.replace(/(\.[0-9]*[1-9])0+$|\.0*$/,'$1');

I wonder why no one gave one!

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  • It will not work with numbers (numbers are stated in the original question). I love the solution for a string representation though! – BennyHilarious Dec 1 '18 at 16:18
6

I needed to solve this problem too when Django was displaying Decimal type values in a text field. E.g. when '1' was the value. It would show '1.00000000'. If '1.23' was the value, it would show '1.23000000' (In the case of a 'decimal_places' setting of 8)

Using parseFloat was not an option for me since it is possible it does not return the exact same value. toFixed was not an option since I did not want to round anything, so I created a function:

function removeTrailingZeros(value) {
    value = value.toString();

    # if not containing a dot, we do not need to do anything
    if (value.indexOf('.') === -1) {
        return value;
    }

    # as long as the last character is a 0 or a dot, remove it
    while((value.slice(-1) === '0' || value.slice(-1) === '.') && value.indexOf('.') !== -1) {
        value = value.substr(0, value.length - 1);
    }
    return value;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This works, however it's quite inefficient, since it results in the creation of multiple strings per execution. Imagine running this on all cells in a table, where a good number were .00000. A better option would be to determine how many trailing zeros there were, then do the slice in one go. Determining what a character is, is largely efficient, splitting strings is less so. – Derek Nigel Bartram Jan 26 '18 at 14:24
  • I did something similar to your suggestion Derek: github.com/rek/remove-trailing-zeros/blob/master/… – rekarnar Jul 9 '18 at 9:32
  • Perf test is here: jsperf.com/remove-trailing-zeros/1, you were right, finding the zeros and removing them is way faster! – rekarnar Jul 10 '18 at 9:38
4

None of these solutions worked for me for very small numbers. http://numeraljs.com/ solved this for me.

parseFloat(0.00000001.toFixed(8));
// 1e-8

numeral(0.00000001).format('0[.][00000000]');
// "0.00000001"
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  • It can't handle more than 6 precision. I would say this library is useless if it's meant for small numbers. Definitely not recommended. – Daniel Kmak Dec 21 '17 at 11:33
2

If you cannot use Floats for any reason (like money-floats involved) and are already starting from a string representing a correct number, you could find this solution handy. It converts a string representing a number to a string representing number w/out trailing zeroes.

function removeTrailingZeroes( strAmount ) {
    // remove all trailing zeroes in the decimal part
    var strDecSepCd = '.'; // decimal separator
    var iDSPosition = strAmount.indexOf( strDecSepCd ); // decimal separator positions
    if ( iDSPosition !== -1 ) {
        var strDecPart = strAmount.substr( iDSPosition ); // including the decimal separator

        var i = strDecPart.length - 1;
        for ( ; i >= 0 ; i-- ) {
            if ( strDecPart.charAt(i) !== '0') {
                break;
            }
        }

        if ( i=== 0 ) {
            return strAmount.substring(0, iDSPosition);
        } else {
            // return INTPART and DS + DECPART including the rightmost significant number
            return strAmount.substring(0, iDSPosition) + strDecPart.substring(0,i + 1);
        }
    }

    return strAmount;
}
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1

If you use toFixed, a more simple and stable (no more float operations) solution can be:

(+n).toFixed(2).replace(/(\.0+|0+)$/, '')


// 0 => 0
// 0.1234 => 0.12
// 0.1001 => 0.1

// 1 => 1
// 1.1234 => 1.12
// 1.1001 => 1.1

// 100 => 100
// 100.1234 => 100.12
// 100.1001 => 100.1

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0

After reading all of the answers - and comments - I ended up with this:

function isFloat(n) {
    let number = (Number(n) === n && n % 1 !== 0) ? eval(parseFloat(n)) : n;
    return number;
}

I know using eval can be harmful somehow but this helped me a lot.

So:

isFloat(1.234000);     // = 1.234;
isFloat(1.234001);     // = 1.234001
isFloat(1.2340010000); // = 1.234001

If you want to limit the decimal places, use toFixed() as others pointed out.

let number = (Number(n) === n && n % 1 !== 0) ? eval(parseFloat(n).toFixed(3)) : n;

That's it.

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0

I needed to remove any trailing zeros but keep at least 2 decimals, including any zeros.
The numbers I'm working with are 6 decimal number strings, generated by .toFixed(6).

Expected Result:

var numstra = 12345.000010 // should return 12345.00001
var numstrb = 12345.100000 // should return 12345.10
var numstrc = 12345.000000 // should return 12345.00
var numstrd = 12345.123000 // should return 12345.123

Solution:

var numstr = 12345.100000

while (numstr[numstr.length-1] === "0") {           
    numstr = numstr.slice(0, -1)
    if (numstr[numstr.length-1] !== "0") {break;}
    if (numstr[numstr.length-3] === ".") {break;}
}

console.log(numstr) // 12345.10

Logic:

Run loop function if string last character is a zero.
Remove the last character and update the string variable.
If updated string last character is not a zero, end loop.
If updated string third to last character is a floating point, end loop.

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-1

Here's a possible solution:

var x = 1.234000 // to become 1.234;
var y = 1.234001; // stays 1.234001

eval(x) --> 1.234
eval(y) --> 1.234001
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    You don't need eval for this simple task ! parseFloat() will be much appropriate. – hutchbat Jun 23 '14 at 23:35
  • 6
    eval == evil. Don't use it ever – eagor Dec 2 '16 at 11:50

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