5

I want to have a class with several nested classes, so that when I create a new parent class, an object of each nested class is created and I can reference the variables within each nested class globally.

Here is my current code:

public class StockChecklist
{
  public class qty1p1 { public string tag = "uniqueval23456"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty1p2 { public string tag = "uniqueval3736"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty2 { public string tag = "uniqueval97357"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty3p1 { public string tag = "uniqueval88356"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p2 { public string tag = "uniqueval62346"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p3 { public string tag = "uniqueval09876"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p4 { public string tag = "uniqueval62156"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty4 { public string tag = "uniqueval25326"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

}

then I create a new parent object with:

StockChecklist theCurrentList = new StockChecklist();

but how do access the nested objects 'tag', 'value' and 'reference'? I was hoping for something simple like StockChecklist.qty1p1.tag = 'changedval999999999';

Is something like this possible with C#?

4
  • 1
    It's very unclear why you have all those cryptically-and-unconventionally-named nested classes. Can you give more context for what you're trying to achieve? It's very likely that there's a better solution. Note that creating an instance of the outer class does not create an instance of any nested classes automatically.
    – Jon Skeet
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:10
  • You can find the answer in here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173120.aspx
    – Alex G.
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:10
  • 1
    You can use a Dictionary class instead of creating 6 classes which have the same purpose which is to store some values Mar 21, 2016 at 11:12
  • The program is for keeping stock of items in a warehouse. Each item has an id ('tag'). The quantity ('value') and description ('reference') will be modified dynamically. I tried to use an associative array with an IDictionary object but it seems that you can only have one key and one value, whereas I need one key ('tag' - but this can change in the program) and 2 values ('value' and 'description')
    – Lee
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

7

You mixed up definition and declaration. Defining a nested class doesn't create an instance. Also the classes you define looks like they all use the same properties. So, you should define one class and declare multiple instances.

You can fix this with:

C# 6.0

public class Info
{
    public string tag { get; set; }
    public string value { get; set; }
    public string reference { get; set; }

}

public class StockChecklist
{
    public Info qty1p1 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval23456", value = "", reference = "" };
    public Info qty1p2 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval3736", value = "", reference = "" };

    public Info qty2 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval97357", value = "", reference = "" };

    public Info qty3p1 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval88356", value = "", reference = "" };
    public Info qty3p2 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval62346", value = "", reference = "" };
    public Info qty3p3 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval09876", value = "", reference = "" };
    public Info qty3p4 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval62156", value = "", reference = "" };
    public Info qty4 { get; } = new Info { tag = "uniqueval25326", value = "", reference = "" };
}

Pre C# 6.0 you have to create the instances in the constructor.

public class StockChecklist
{

    public StockChecklist()
    {
        qty1p1 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval23456", value = "", reference = "" };
        qty1p2 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval3736", value = "", reference = "" };

        qty2 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval97357", value = "", reference = "" };

        qty3p1 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval88356", value = "", reference = "" };
        qty3p2 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval62346", value = "", reference = "" };
        qty3p3 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval09876", value = "", reference = "" };
        qty3p4 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval62156", value = "", reference = "" };
        qty4 = new Info { tag = "uniqueval25326", value = "", reference = "" };
    }

    public Info qty1p1 { get; private set; }
    public Info qty1p2 { get; private set; }

    public Info qty2 { get; private set; }

    public Info qty3p1 { get; private set; }
    public Info qty3p2 { get; private set; }
    public Info qty3p3 { get; private set; }
    public Info qty3p4 { get; private set; }
    public Info qty4 { get; private set; }
}

note: Like some comments already noted, declaring 8 instances of the same class within a class could point on 'poor' design. You could create a Dictionary<> for it.


Here is a dictionary version: (bonus)

public class Info
{
    public string tag { get; set; }
    public string value { get; set; }
    public string reference { get; set; }

}

public class StockChecklist
{
    private Dictionary<string, Info> _infoDict = new Dictionary<string, Info>();

    private void AddToDict(Info info)
    {
        _infoDict.Add(info.tag, info);
    }

    public StockChecklist2()
    {
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval23456", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval3736", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval97357", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval88356", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval62346", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval09876", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval62156", value = "", reference = "" });
        AddToDict(new Info { tag = "uniqueval25326", value = "", reference = "" });
    }

    public bool TryGetByTag(string tag, out Info info)
    {
        return _infoDict.TryGetValue(tag, out info);
    }

    public Info this[string tag]
    {
        get
        {
            Info info;

            if (!_infoDict.TryGetValue(tag, out info))
                return null;

            return info;
        }
    }
}

Use it like: (C# 6.0)

StockChecklist stock = new StockChecklist();
Info info;
if (stock.TryGetByTag("uniqueval23456", out info))
{
    Trace.WriteLine($"{info.tag} = {info.value}");
}

Or (C# 6.0)

Trace.WriteLine(stock["uniqueval88356"]?.value);
5
  • Yep, this appears to be where I was going wrong. I just needed to declare a separate class, then use that class to instantiate objects in my other class. I wrongly thought that nested classes were somehow the answer to accessing objects within the class
    – Lee
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:40
  • I just read your update, and the difference between the different versions of C#. That was more than I could ever ask for. Thank you very much!
    – Lee
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:51
  • I didn't realize I could use my own custom types with Dictionary either! Wow, thank you! Looks like something I will have to look into a lot more
    – Lee
    Mar 21, 2016 at 11:56
  • Can I ask, in the first code example, why did you declare {get; } for each Info instance?
    – Lee
    Mar 21, 2016 at 12:00
  • 1
    I advise the use of properties. Since the property has to be written once, defining the getter will make it readonly. If you're using pre c# 6.0, you must define the setter private. Mar 21, 2016 at 14:30
0

You should do something like this:

  public class qty1p1 { public string tag = "uniqueval23456"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty1p2 { public string tag = "uniqueval3736"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty2 { public string tag = "uniqueval97357"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty3p1 { public string tag = "uniqueval88356"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p2 { public string tag = "uniqueval62346"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p3 { public string tag = "uniqueval09876"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }
  public class qty3p4 { public string tag = "uniqueval62156"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

  public class qty4 { public string tag = "uniqueval25326"; public string value = ""; public string reference = ""; }

public class StockChecklist
{
    public qty1p1 _qty1p1;
    public qty1p2 _qty1p2;
.
.
.
}

and Then you can use it like:

StockChecklist theCurrentList = new StockChecklist();
theCurrentList._qty1p1.tag = 'changedval999999999';
4
  • 1
    You probably mean theCurrentList.qty1p1.tag, don´t your? Furthermore you need to instantiate those properties within StockCheckList first. Mar 21, 2016 at 11:12
  • Yes of course. This is what happens when you copy code from the question. you forget to edit it ;) Mar 21, 2016 at 11:13
  • Still runs into an NRE as _qty1p1 is not instantiaed :) Mar 21, 2016 at 11:14
  • It would be enough to have 1 class with Tag, Value, Reference properties Mar 21, 2016 at 11:14
-1

You can do like this:

public class Parent
{

    public class child1 { public string name = "a"; public int Value = 1;}
    public class child2 { public string name = "b"; public int Value = 2;}
    public class child3 { public string name = "c"; public int Value = 3;}
    public class child4 { public string name = "d"; public int Value = 4;}
    public class child5 { public string name = "e"; public int Value = 5;}
    public child1 c1;
    public child2 c2;
    public child3 c3;
    public child4 c4;
    public child5 c5;
    public Parent() {
        this.c1 = new child1();
        this.c2 = new child2();
        this.c3 = new child3();
        this.c4 = new child4();
        this.c5 = new child5();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Parent p1 = new Parent();
        Console.WriteLine(p1.c1.name);
        Console.WriteLine(p1.c2.name);
        Console.WriteLine(p1.c3.name);
        Console.WriteLine(p1.c4.name);
        Console.WriteLine(p1.c5.name);
        Console.ReadLine();

    }

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