1

I am currently writing a program to simulate gas in a box. But I have come across an issue with class operators. Unfortunately to make things annoying the class is called Vector, I know some won't like it being called this.

Vector.h

class Vector {
private:

double x;
double y;
double z;

public:

Vector & operator+=(const Vector & v){
    x += v.x;
    y += v.y;
    z += v.z;
    return *this;
}

I have editted the code above to make this problem clearer. I have left out the constructer etc as they dont effect the problem.

And for .cpp

Vector.cpp

Vector operator+(const Vector v) const{
Vector v2(*this);
v2+=v;
return v2;
}

And his yeilds error:

C:\Users\XXXXX\ClionProjects\XXXXX\YYYYY\Vector.cpp:95:34: error: non-member function 'Vector operator+(Vector)' cannot have cv-qualifier

C:\Users\XXXXX\ClionProjects\XXXXX\YYYYY\Vector.cpp: In function 'Vector operator+(Vector)':

Any help greatly appreciated.

  • @BarryTheHatchet I'd interpreted the question as a typo (just missing the declarator). Given that it's actually a different function entirely, that's clearly not the case... – Barry Mar 21 '16 at 16:02
2

The error tells you what's wrong. You made these non-member functions, but they should be member functions. The compiler detected the problem by your (correct) use of const, though the number of arguments is also lacking and that would be a further compilation error once the first was fixed.

Either you forgot to put these function definitions inside the class Vector { ... }; area, or you forgot to write Vector:: before operator.

  • 1
    operator+ most certainly should not be a member function. I find this answer confusing. – SergeyA Mar 21 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    Why do you say operator+ should not be a member function? That could be... – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Mar 21 '16 at 16:23
  • @SergeyA: That's your opinion. It's not a fact. I am sticking to the facts. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 21 '16 at 16:25
  • @BarryTheHatchet, no, you are not. You made these non-member functions, but they should be member functions. - this is your opinion as well (should be). And once we are to judge our opinions, you can rest assured, mine will find much more support than yours. – SergeyA Mar 21 '16 at 16:28
  • I am inclined to agree with Sergey that your answer is unclear. But I do feel it is very close to the answer I need and maybe my interpretation is wrong. If you could make it clearer, even add some code if not to much trouble. I'd be very thankful. – Dan S Mar 21 '16 at 16:48
2

Only member functions can have const specifiers. Both your operators are non-member functions (because they are missing class name as part of their signature) and are not defined inside the class definition.

As a result, you have a compilation error.

To fix this error you need to translate operator+ to a free function: remove it's declaration from your Vector class and change it's sigature to (the easiest form):

Vector operator+ (const Vector& lhs, const Vector& rhs);

There are certain reasons to use a different signature, and accept first argument by value, but this is way too deep for your level, so I suggest to stick to const reference for now.

1

Thanks for the other inputs, Both have merit to them. I have found my own answer based off of The answer given by Barry @BarryTheHatchet. And other sources. To solve this problem I moved the definition within the header file in the public section, giving me:

 Vector & operator+=(const Vector & v){
    x += v.x;
    y += v.y;
    z += v.z;
    return *this;
}

Vector operator+(const Vector v) const {
    Vector VecPlus(*this);
    VecPlus.x += v.x;
    VecPlus.y += v.y;
    VecPlus.z += v.z;
    return VecPlus;
}

This was the result, I do hope it is a legitimate way to code it and not a shody way to do it but would lead to later problems. I've advanced in my project and it has raised none so far.

  • In the second function if you make the argument non-const then you can work on v directly and avoid creating VecPlus, which is currently an excess copy. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 22 '16 at 15:56

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