1

I have a matrix of data:

> matrix <- matrix(rnorm(16), ncol=4)
> matrix
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]        [,4]
[1,] -0.9239653  0.4217107 -0.3092167  0.09732866
[2,] -0.9635737  0.3755872 -0.4033848  1.67775919
[3,]  1.1193376 -0.3618842 -1.0036277 -0.50638047
[4,] -0.2659838 -0.8215967  0.1611249 -0.05114933

I want to re-order the rows of the matrix by an index specified in a vector. If the numbers in the index correspond to row numbers in the matrix, this is easy:

> index <- c(3, 2, 1, 4)
> reordered.matrix <- matrix[index, ]
> reordered.matrix
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]        [,4]
[1,]  1.1193376 -0.3618842 -1.0036277 -0.50638047
[2,] -0.9635737  0.3755872 -0.4033848  1.67775919
[3,] -0.9239653  0.4217107 -0.3092167  0.09732866
[4,] -0.2659838 -0.8215967  0.1611249 -0.05114933

However, in real life my index contains some zeros. These zeros specify positions where I want to discard the data, i.e. to just have a row of zeros or NAs in that row. Here is what I would like to get:

> index <- c(3, 0, 1, 0)
> reordered.matrix <- matrix[index, ]
> reordered.matrix
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]        [,4]
[1,]  1.1193376 -0.3618842 -1.0036277 -0.50638047
[2,]          0          0          0           0  
[3,] -0.9239653  0.4217107 -0.3092167  0.09732866
[4,]          0          0          0           0

But instead R ignores the zeroes, and i just get:

           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]        [,4]
[1,]  1.1193376 -0.3618842 -1.0036277 -0.50638047
[2,] -0.9239653  0.4217107 -0.3092167  0.09732866

A possible solution would be to write a loop that goes though the index on-by-one, copies the data and writes it to the correct position on a new matrix. However, the matrices I am using are huge (millions of rows) and loops are way too slow. Is there any way I can get what I want without resorting to a loop?

1

We can replace the 0's in the 'index' with NA and use that for ordering the rows of matrix.

m1 <- matrix[(NA^!index)*index,]
replace(m1, is.na(m1), 0)
#            [,1]       [,2]       [,3]        [,4]
#[1,]  1.1193376 -0.3618842 -1.0036277 -0.50638047
#[2,]  0.0000000  0.0000000  0.0000000  0.00000000
#[3,] -0.9239653  0.4217107 -0.3092167  0.09732866
#[4,]  0.0000000  0.0000000  0.0000000  0.00000000

NOTE: It is better not to call a matrix object as matrix.

  • 1
    Thanks Akrun, this worked. – D Greenwood Mar 22 '16 at 10:06

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