3

I have an image in my UWP c# project, that is a transparent png with white foreground. I now want to change the white color from this png image into another color (like blueish).

Example (note that the colored image does not have a transparent background. This is due bad image processing software I'm using and to demonstrate the change of the white color. The Background should be transparent in the end result).

bubble1 bubble2

I remember, that this was possible in unity, now I want to do this now in an uwp-app. I thought about using the Lumia ImagingSDK or maybe the Composition API, but do not know, hot to do it with either those.

3
  • 1
    It is possible to change hues and do image manipulation on bitmaps, of course, but what is your need to do so? Why not pre-generate all the hues that you need? One possible answer is in this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/14364716/… which plays with the hue among other things - but I would seriously consider the need and weigh it up against speed of pre-loading the hues you need. – Pedro G. Dias Mar 21 '16 at 17:31
  • What do you mean by Why not pre-generate all the hues that you need? I want the same image but in different colors. And I thought in consideration to package-size and costumizability, that my approach to change colors might be suiting to this. So just that I get you right: Your approach would be transform from ARGB to HSV/HSL color space and do color manipulation there manually? I was hoping, that there are already functions implemented in some MS APIs. – user3079834 Mar 21 '16 at 17:42
  • Open Photoshop and generate all the variants that you need - then you can pre-load them into your app and have a way faster application than changing the hues programatically. But yeah, it's a consideration, you may want less memory usage or higher performance. I dont know the app you're building, in which case changing hues is a fast & neat way to get there :) – Pedro G. Dias Mar 21 '16 at 17:45
5

A way you could do this is using the Composition effect system.

Prerequisites

  1. Targeting at least build 10586 (the Composition API was experimental before this).
  2. While not strictly required, having a basic understanding of the Visual Layer wouldn't hurt. I wrote a blog post that is an introduction to this topic here.
  3. Adding the Win2D nuget package.

Additionally you can look to a gist I wrote here, which is a quick way to get up and running using the Composition API within a XAML app. It demos using an effect as well. Not only that, but it also covers loading an image using the Composition API (with a package I wrote).

Gettings Started

You'll want to do something very similar to the gist, but instead of defining an InvertEffect, you'll want to define both a CompositeEffect and a ColorSourceEffect. What this will do is take an image and use it as a "mask", and then replaces the white in the image with a color. You would define the effect like this:

IGraphicsEffect graphicsEffect = new CompositeEffect
{
    Mode = Microsoft.Graphics.Canvas.CanvasComposite.DestinationIn,
    Sources =
    {
        new ColorSourceEffect
        {
            Name = "colorSource",
            Color = Color.FromArgb(255, 255, 255, 255)
        },
        new CompositionEffectSourceParameter("mask")
    }
};

The next step is to create an effect factory:

var effectFactory = compositor.CreateEffectFactory(graphicsEffect, new string[] { "colorSource.Color" });

The second parameter, while not required, is probably what you want in this case. Setting this parameter allows you to change the property after the effect has been compiled, which allows you to set it manually and every new effect brush you create or to animate that property on an effect brush. We'll just be setting it manually. Use your new effect factory to create a new effect brush. Note that this factory can create many new effect brushes with the definition you used above:

var effectBrush = effectFactory.CreateBrush();

However, first you'll need to apply your image as the mask. You can load your image into a surface using a library I wrote called CompositionImageLoader. You can also download it on nuget. After creating a surface with your image, create a CompositionSurfaceBrush and apply it to an effect.

var imageLoader = ImageLoaderFactory.CreateImageLoader(compositor);

var surface = imageLoader.LoadImageFromUri(new Uri("ms-appx:///Assets/Images/HAvng.png"));
var brush = compositor.CreateSurfaceBrush(surface);

effectBrush.SetSourceParameter("mask", brush);

Note that you should probably keep your ImageLoader somewhere, as creating one over and over again will be expensive. All that's left to do is apply the effect brush to a visual and set the color:

visual.Brush = effectBrush;

effectBrush.Properties.InsertColor("colorSource.Color", Colors.Red);

And then you're done! Note that if you want to change the color after this, all you have to do is call the same InsertColor method as above with a new color.

Final Product

In my test code, the method looked like this:

var compositor = ElementCompositionPreview.GetElementVisual(this).Compositor;
var visual = compositor.CreateSpriteVisual();

visual.Size = new Vector2(83, 86);
visual.Offset = new Vector3(50, 50, 0);

_imageLoader = ImageLoaderFactory.CreateImageLoader(compositor);

var surface = _imageLoader.LoadImageFromUri(new Uri("ms-appx:///Assets/Images/HAvng.png"));
var brush = compositor.CreateSurfaceBrush(surface);

IGraphicsEffect graphicsEffect = new CompositeEffect
{
    Mode = Microsoft.Graphics.Canvas.CanvasComposite.DestinationIn,
    Sources =
    {
        new ColorSourceEffect
        {
            Name = "colorSource",
            Color = Color.FromArgb(255, 255, 255, 255)
        },
        new CompositionEffectSourceParameter("mask")
    }
};

_effectFactory = compositor.CreateEffectFactory(graphicsEffect, new string[] { "colorSource.Color" });
var effectBrush = _effectFactory.CreateBrush();

effectBrush.SetSourceParameter("mask", brush);

visual.Brush = effectBrush;

effectBrush.Properties.InsertColor("colorSource.Color", Colors.Red);

ElementCompositionPreview.SetElementChildVisual(this, visual);

Note that in this example the visual was attached to this, which was my MainPage. You can attach it to any XAML element. If you'd like to see an example of a custom control that you can define in your XAML markup that creates and then resizes your visual as you resize the control, you can find that here.

To see more Composition related stuff, come on over to our GitHub page! We'll be happy to help you out with any questions you might have about the API.

3
  • This works great, thanks. Instead of this, I was using an image. The code creates a nice red color, where it was transparent whitish before, like I wanted it to. I set visual.Offset = new Vector3(0, 0, 0); and now have two questions: 1. How to put the new element before the old (original) Image? With the current code, the new picture will appear behind the old image. 2. How to replace the old (original) Image? – user3079834 Apr 26 '16 at 8:54
  • @robmikh, has this type of effect been added to the Composition Sample app?? Is there some updated reference code that we can look to get an idea of how to do color replacement using Composition? This code is slightly outdated, especially with the use of ImageLoaderFactory. And like the OP said, this would be nice to be applied directly to an Image control. – Maximus Nov 30 '17 at 19:09
  • @Maximus: by using brush.SetSourceParameter("mask", AnImageControl.GetAlphaMask()); – Gábor Aug 11 '18 at 17:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.