106

Hi I am a newbie in the Kotlin world. I like what I see so far and started to think to convert some of our libraries we use in our application from Java to Kotlin.

These libraries are full of Pojos with setters, getters and Builder classes. Now I have googled to find what is the best way to implement Builders in Kotlin but no success.

2nd Update: The question is how to write a Builder design-pattern for a simple pojo with some parameters in Kotlin? The code below is my attempt by writing java code and then using the eclipse-kotlin-plugin to convert to Kotlin.

class Car private constructor(builder:Car.Builder) {
    var model:String? = null
    var year:Int = 0
    init {
        this.model = builder.model
        this.year = builder.year
    }
    companion object Builder {
        var model:String? = null
        private set

        var year:Int = 0
        private set

        fun model(model:String):Builder {
            this.model = model
            return this
        }
        fun year(year:Int):Builder {
            this.year = year
            return this
        }
        fun build():Car {
            val car = Car(this)
            return car
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    do you need model and year to be mutable? Do you change them after a Car creation? – voddan Mar 22 '16 at 4:48
  • I guess they should be immutable yes. Also you want to be sure they are set both and not empty – Keyhan Mar 22 '16 at 6:02
  • 1
    You can also use this github.com/jffiorillo/jvmbuilder Annotation Processor to generate the builder class automatically for you. – JoseF Aug 20 '18 at 7:48
  • @JoseF Good idea to add it to standard kotlin. It is useful for libraries written in kotlin. – Keyhan Aug 20 '18 at 12:49

12 Answers 12

213

First and foremost, in most cases you don't need to use builders in Kotlin because we have default and named arguments. This enables you to write

class Car(val model: String? = null, val year: Int = 0)

and use it like so:

val car = Car(model = "X")

If you absolutely want to use builders, here's how you could do it:

Making the Builder a companion object doesn't make sense because objects are singletons. Instead declare it as an nested class (which is static by default in Kotlin).

Move the properties to the constructor so the object can also be instantiated the regular way (make the constructor private if it shouldn't) and use a secondary constructor that takes a builder and delegates to the primary constructor. The code will look as follow:

class Car( //add private constructor if necessary
        val model: String?,
        val year: Int
) {

    private constructor(builder: Builder) : this(builder.model, builder.year)

    class Builder {
        var model: String? = null
            private set

        var year: Int = 0
            private set

        fun model(model: String) = apply { this.model = model }

        fun year(year: Int) = apply { this.year = year }

        fun build() = Car(this)
    }
}

Usage: val car = Car.Builder().model("X").build()

This code can be shortened additionally by using a builder DSL:

class Car (
        val model: String?,
        val year: Int
) {

    private constructor(builder: Builder) : this(builder.model, builder.year)

    companion object {
        inline fun build(block: Builder.() -> Unit) = Builder().apply(block).build()
    }

    class Builder {
        var model: String? = null
        var year: Int = 0

        fun build() = Car(this)
    }
}

Usage: val car = Car.build { model = "X" }

If some values are required and don't have default values, you need to put them in the constructor of the builder and also in the build method we just defined:

class Car (
        val model: String?,
        val year: Int,
        val required: String
) {

    private constructor(builder: Builder) : this(builder.model, builder.year, builder.required)

    companion object {
        inline fun build(required: String, block: Builder.() -> Unit) = Builder(required).apply(block).build()
    }

    class Builder(
            val required: String
    ) {
        var model: String? = null
        var year: Int = 0

        fun build() = Car(this)
    }
}

Usage: val car = Car.build(required = "requiredValue") { model = "X" }

  • 2
    Nothing, but the author of the question specifically asked how to implement the builder pattern. – Kirill Rakhman Mar 25 '16 at 19:19
  • 3
    I should correct myself, the builder pattern has some advantages, e.g. you could pass a partially constructed builder to another method. But you're right, I'll add a remark. – Kirill Rakhman Mar 28 '16 at 17:15
  • 2
    @KirillRakhman how about calling the builder from java? Is there an easy way to make the builder available to java? – Keyhan Apr 5 '16 at 20:27
  • 4
    All three versions can be called from Java like so: Car.Builder builder = new Car.Builder();. However only the first version has a fluent interface so the calls to the second and third versions can't be chained. – Kirill Rakhman Apr 6 '16 at 9:36
  • 5
    I think the kotlin example at the top only explains one possible use case. The main reason I use builders is to convert a mutable object into an immutable one. That is, I need to mutate it over time while I'm "building" and then come up with an immutable object. At least in my code there are only one or 2 examples of code that has so many variations of parameters that I would use a builder instead of several different constructors. But to make an immutable object, I have a few cases where a builder is definitely the cleanest way I can think of. – ycomp Jun 8 '17 at 13:38
10

Because I'm using Jackson library for parsing objects from JSON, I need to have an empty constructor and I can't have optional fields. Also all fields have to be mutable. Then I can use this nice syntax which does the same thing as Builder pattern:

val car = Car().apply{ model = "Ford"; year = 2000 }
  • 6
    In Jackson you don't actually need to have an empty constructor, and fields don't need to be mutable. You just have to annotate your constructor parameters with @JsonProperty – Bastian Voigt Dec 16 '17 at 0:17
  • 2
    You don't even have to annotate with @JsonProperty anymore, if you compile with the -parameters switch. – Amir Abiri Mar 16 '18 at 5:59
  • 2
    Jackson can actually be configured to use a builder. – Keyhan Mar 30 '18 at 16:41
  • If you add the jackson-module-kotlin module to your project, you can just use data classes and it will work. – Nils Breunese Sep 20 '18 at 11:51
7

I personally have never seen a builder in Kotlin, but maybe it is just me.

All validation one needs happens in the init block:

class Car(val model: String,
          val year: Int = 2000) {

    init {
        if(year < 1900) throw Exception("...")
    }
}

Here I took a liberty to guess that you don't really wanted model and year to be changeable. Also those default values seems to have no sense, (especially null for name) but I left one for demonstration purposes.

An Opinion: The builder pattern used in Java as a mean to live without named parameters. In languages with named parameters (like Kotlin or Python) it is a good practice to have constructors with long lists of (maybe optional) parameters.

  • 2
    Thanks a lot for the answer. I like your approach but the downside is for a class with many parameters it becomes not so friendly to use the constructor and also test the class. – Keyhan Mar 22 '16 at 6:26
  • 1
    +Keyhan two other ways you can do validation, assuming the validation doesn't happen between the fields: 1) use property delegates where the setter does validation - this is pretty much the same thing as having a normal setter that does validation 2) Avoid primitive obsession and create new types to pass in that validate themselves. – Jacob Zimmerman Mar 22 '16 at 13:13
  • 1
    @Keyhan this is a classic approach in Python, it works very well even for functions with tens of arguments. The trick here is to use named arguments (not available in Java!) – voddan Mar 24 '16 at 17:42
  • 1
    Yes, it is also a solution worth using, it seems unlike java where builder class have some clear advantages, in Kotlin it is not so obvious, talked to C# developers, C# also have kotlin like features (default value and you could name params when calling constructor) they did not use builder pattern either. – Keyhan Mar 26 '16 at 22:55
  • 1
    @vxh.viet many of such cases can be solved with @JvmOverloads kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/… – voddan Nov 22 '17 at 6:32
4

I have seen many examples that declare extra funs as builders. I personally like this approach. Save effort to write builders.

package android.zeroarst.lab.koltinlab

import kotlin.properties.Delegates

class Lab {
    companion object {
        @JvmStatic fun main(args: Array<String>) {

            val roy = Person {
                name = "Roy"
                age = 33
                height = 173
                single = true
                car {
                    brand = "Tesla"
                    model = "Model X"
                    year = 2017
                }
                car {
                    brand = "Tesla"
                    model = "Model S"
                    year = 2018
                }
            }

            println(roy)
        }

        class Person() {
            constructor(init: Person.() -> Unit) : this() {
                this.init()
            }

            var name: String by Delegates.notNull()
            var age: Int by Delegates.notNull()
            var height: Int by Delegates.notNull()
            var single: Boolean by Delegates.notNull()
            val cars: MutableList<Car> by lazy { arrayListOf<Car>() }

            override fun toString(): String {
                return "name=$name, age=$age, " +
                        "height=$height, " +
                        "single=${when (single) {
                            true -> "looking for a girl friend T___T"
                            false -> "Happy!!"
                        }}\nCars: $cars"
            }
        }

        class Car() {

            var brand: String by Delegates.notNull()
            var model: String by Delegates.notNull()
            var year: Int by Delegates.notNull()

            override fun toString(): String {
                return "(brand=$brand, model=$model, year=$year)"
            }
        }

        fun Person.car(init: Car.() -> Unit): Unit {
            cars.add(Car().apply(init))
        }

    }
}

I have not yet found a way that can force some fields to be initialized in DSL like showing errors instead of throwing exceptions. Let me know if anyone knows.

4

One approach is to do something like the following:

class Car(
  val model: String?,
  val color: String?,
  val type: String?) {

    data class Builder(
      var model: String? = null,
      var color: String? = null,
      var type: String? = null) {

        fun model(model: String) = apply { this.model = model }
        fun color(color: String) = apply { this.color = color }
        fun type(type: String) = apply { this.type = type }
        fun build() = Car(model, color, type)
    }
}

Usage sample:

val car = Car.Builder()
  .model("Ford Focus")
  .color("Black")
  .type("Type")
  .build()
1

For a simple class you don't need a separate builder. You can make use of optional constructor arguments as Kirill Rakhman described.

If you have more complex class then Kotlin provides a way to create Groovy style Builders/DSL:

Type-Safe Builders

Here is an example:

Github Example - Builder / Assembler

  • Thanks, but I was thinking of using it from java as well. As far as I know optional arguments would not work from java. – Keyhan Feb 14 '17 at 8:45
0

I would say the pattern and implementation stays pretty much the same in Kotlin. You can sometimes skip it thanks to default values, but for more complicated object creation, builders are still a useful tool that can't be omitted.

  • As far as constructors with default values you can even do validation of input using initializer blocks. However, if you need something stateful (so that you don't have to specify everything up front) then the builder pattern is still the way to go. – mfulton26 Mar 21 '16 at 20:44
  • Could you give me a simple example with code? Say a simple User class with name and email field with validation for email. – Keyhan Mar 21 '16 at 20:54
0

you can use optional parameter in kotlin example:

fun myFunc(p1: String, p2: Int = -1, p3: Long = -1, p4: String = "default") {
    System.out.printf("parameter %s %d %d %s\n", p1, p2, p3, p4)
}

then

myFunc("a")
myFunc("a", 1)
myFunc("a", 1, 2)
myFunc("a", 1, 2, "b")
0
class Foo private constructor(@DrawableRes requiredImageRes: Int, optionalTitle: String?) {

    @DrawableRes
    @get:DrawableRes
    val requiredImageRes: Int

    val optionalTitle: String?

    init {
        this.requiredImageRes = requiredImageRes
        this.requiredImageRes = optionalTitle
    }

    class Builder {

        @DrawableRes
        private var requiredImageRes: Int = -1

        private var optionalTitle: String? = null

        fun requiredImageRes(@DrawableRes imageRes: Int): Builder {
            this.intent = intent
            return this
        } 

        fun optionalTitle(title: String): Builder {
            this.optionalTitle = title
            return this
        }

        fun build(): Foo {
            if(requiredImageRes == -1) {
                throw IllegalStateException("No image res provided")
            }
            return Foo(this.requiredImageRes, this.optionalTitle)
        }

    }

}
0

I implemented a basic Builder pattern in Kotlin with the follow code:

data class DialogMessage(
        var title: String = "",
        var message: String = ""
) {


    class Builder( context: Context){


        private var context: Context = context
        private var title: String = ""
        private var message: String = ""

        fun title( title : String) = apply { this.title = title }

        fun message( message : String ) = apply { this.message = message  }    

        fun build() = KeyoDialogMessage(
                title,
                message
        )

    }

    private lateinit var  dialog : Dialog

    fun show(){
        this.dialog= Dialog(context)
        .
        .
        .
        dialog.show()

    }

    fun hide(){
        if( this.dialog != null){
            this.dialog.dismiss()
        }
    }
}

And finally

Java:

new DialogMessage.Builder( context )
       .title("Title")
       .message("Message")
       .build()
       .show();

Kotlin:

DialogMessage.Builder( context )
       .title("Title")
       .message("")
       .build()
       .show()
0

People nowdays should check Kotlin's Type-Safe Builders.

Using said way of object creation will look something like this:

html {
    head {
        title {+"XML encoding with Kotlin"}
    }
    // ...
}

A nice 'in-action' usage example is the vaadin-on-kotlin framework, which utilizes typesafe builders to assemble views and components.

0

I was working on a Kotlin project that exposed an API consumed by Java clients (which can't take advantage of the Kotlin language constructs). We had to add builders to make them usable in Java, so I created an @Builder annotation: https://github.com/ThinkingLogic/kotlin-builder-annotation - it's basically a replacement for the Lombok @Builder annotation for Kotlin.

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