46

How can I break the iteration on reduce method?

for

for (var i = Things.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
  if(Things[i] <= 0){
    break;
  }
};

reduce

Things.reduce(function(memo, current){
  if(current <= 0){
    //break ???
    //return; <-- this will return undefined to memo, which is not what I want
  }
}, 0)
  • What is current in the code above? I don't see how these can do the same thing. In any case there are methods that break early like some, every, find – elclanrs Mar 22 '16 at 1:00
  • some and every return booleans and find return a single record, what I want is to run operations to generate a memo. current is the currentValue. reference – Julio Marins Mar 22 '16 at 1:03
  • I mean what is current in the first piece of code? – elclanrs Mar 22 '16 at 1:09
  • updated, thanks for the reply – Julio Marins Mar 22 '16 at 1:10
  • 2
    The answer is you cannot break early from reduce , you'll have to find another way with builtin functions that exit early or create your own helper, or use lodash or something. Can you post a full example of what you want to do? – elclanrs Mar 22 '16 at 1:11
47

UPDATE

Some of the commentators make a good point that the original array is being mutated in order to break early inside the .reduce() logic.

Therefore, I've modified the answer slightly by adding a .slice(0) before calling a follow-on .reduce() step.

This is to preserve the original array by copying its contents in linear time - O(n). The original array is also logged to the console as proof that it's been preserved.

const array = ["9", "91", "95", "96", "99"];
const x = array.slice(0).reduce((acc, curr, i, arr) => {  // notice the "slice(0)"
 if (i === 2) arr.splice(1); // eject early
 return (acc += curr);
}, "");
console.log("x: ", x, "\noriginal Arr: ", array); // x:  99195
// original Arr:  [ '9', '91', '95', '96', '99' ]

OLD

You CAN break on any iteration of a .reduce() invocation by mutating the 4th argument of the reduce function: "array". No need for a custom reduce function. See Docs for full list of .reduce() parameters.

Array.prototype.reduce((acc, curr, i, array))

The 4th argument is the array being iterated over.

const array = ['9', '91', '95', '96', '99'];
const x = array
.reduce((acc, curr, i, arr) => {
    if(i === 2) arr.splice(1);  // eject early
    return acc += curr;
  }, '');
console.log('x: ', x);  // x:  99195

WHY?:

The 1 and only reason I can think of to use this instead of the many other solutions presented is if you want to maintain a functional programming methodology to your algo, and you want the most declarative approach possible to accomplish that. If your entire goal is to literally REDUCE an array to an alternate non-falsey primitive (String, Number, Boolean, Symbol) then I would argue this IS in fact, the best approach.

WHY NOT?

There's a whole list of arguments to make for NOT mutating function parameters as it's a bad practice.

  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer. – Evan Plaice Feb 10 '18 at 1:53
  • 3
    +1. This should be the accepted answer. And yet this solution should never be used, for reasons stated under "WHY NOT". – johndodo Apr 10 '18 at 17:44
  • 2
    This is really BAD ADVICE, because splice performs a visible mutation (array). According to the functional paradigm you'd use either a reduce in continuation passing style or utilize lazy evaluation with a right-associative reduce. Or, as a simpler alternative, just plain recursion. – ftor Apr 16 '18 at 13:41
  • Hold On! by mutating the 4th argument of the reduce function: "array" is not a correct statement. In this case it is happening (the example in the answer) because its cutting the array to single length array (first element) while its already reached index 2, obviously next time, for index 3 it will not get a item to iterate (as you are mutating the original reference to array of length 1). In case you perform a pop that will also mutate the source array too but not stop in between (if you are not at the second last index). – Koushik Chatterjee Sep 1 '18 at 16:04
  • @KoushikChatterjee My statement is correct for my implicit meaning. It is not correct for your explicit meaning. You should offer a suggestion on modifying the statement to include your points and I'll make the edit as it would improve the overall answer. – Tobiah Rex Sep 5 '18 at 3:28
7

You can use functions like some and every as long as you don't care about the return value. every breaks when the callback returns false, some when it returns true:

things.every(function(v, i, o) {
  // do stuff 
  if (timeToBreak) {
    return false;
  } else {
    return true;
  }
}, thisArg);
  • 12
    But if he is trying to do reduce then by definition he does care about the return value. – user663031 Mar 22 '16 at 3:36
  • @torazaburo—sure, but I don't see it being used in the OP and there are other ways of getting a result. ;-) – RobG Mar 22 '16 at 8:47
6

There is no way, of course, to get the built-in version of reduce to exit prematurely.

But you can write your own version of reduce which uses a special token to identify when the loop should be broken.

var EXIT_REDUCE = {};

function reduce(a, f, result) {
  for (let i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    let val = f(result, a[i], i, a);
    if (val === EXIT_REDUCE) break;
    result = val;
  }
  return result;
}

Use it like this, to sum an array but exit when you hit 99:

reduce([1, 2, 99, 3], (a, b) => b === 99 ? EXIT_REDUCE : a + b, 0);

> 3
  • 1
    You can use lazy evaluation or CPS to achieve the desired behavior: – rand Mar 23 '16 at 7:36
  • The first sentence of this answer is incorrect. You can break, see my answer below for details. – Tobiah Rex Jan 25 '18 at 19:33
5

Don't use reduce. Just iterate on the array with normal iterators (for, etc) and break out when your condition is met.

  • 2
    where's the fun in this? :) – Alexander Mills Dec 5 '18 at 11:08
  • @AlexanderMills probably he likes to be an imperator! – dimpiax Dec 14 '18 at 14:41
4

You can break every code - and thus every build in iterator - by throwing an exception:

function breakReduceException(value) {
    this.value = value
}

try {
    Things.reduce(function(memo, current) {
        ...
        if (current <= 0) throw new breakReduceException(memo)
        ...
    }, 0)
} catch (e) {
    if (e instanceof breakReduceException) var memo = e.value
    else throw e
}
  • 4
    This is probably the least efficient execution-wise of all the answers. Try/catch breaks the existing execution context and falls back to the 'slow path' of execution. Say goodbye to any optimizations that V8 does under the covers. – Evan Plaice Feb 10 '18 at 4:17
1

Array.every can provide a very natural mechanism for breaking out of high order iteration.

const product = function(array) {
    let accumulator = 1;
    array.every( factor => {
        accumulator *= factor;
        return !!factor;
    });
    return accumulator;
}
console.log(product([2,2,2,0,2,2]));
// 0

0

Another simple implementation that I came with solving the same issue:

function reduce(array, reducer, first) {
  let result = first || array.shift()

  while (array.length > 0) {
    result = reducer(result, array.shift())
    if (result && result.reduced) {
      return result.reduced
    }
  }

  return result
}
0

As the promises have resolve and reject callback arguments, I created the reduce workaround function with the break callback argument. It takes all the same arguments as native reduce method, except the first one is an array to work on (avoid monkey patching). The third [2] initialValue argument is optional. See the snippet below for the function reducer.

var list = ["w","o","r","l","d"," ","p","i","e","r","o","g","i"];

var result = reducer(list,(total,current,index,arr,stop)=>{
  if(current === " ") stop(); //when called, the loop breaks
  return total + current;
},'hello ');

console.log(result); //hello world

function reducer(arr, callback, initial) {
  var hasInitial = arguments.length >= 3;
  var total = hasInitial ? initial : arr[0];
  var breakNow = false;
  for (var i = hasInitial ? 0 : 1; i < arr.length; i++) {
    var currentValue = arr[i];
    var currentIndex = i;
    var newTotal = callback(total, currentValue, currentIndex, arr, () => breakNow = true);
    if (breakNow) break;
    total = newTotal;
  }
  return total;
}

And here is the reducer as an Array method modified script:

Array.prototype.reducer = function(callback,initial){
  var hasInitial = arguments.length >= 2;
  var total = hasInitial ? initial : this[0];
  var breakNow = false;
  for (var i = hasInitial ? 0 : 1; i < this.length; i++) {
    var currentValue = this[i];
    var currentIndex = i;
    var newTotal = callback(total, currentValue, currentIndex, this, () => breakNow = true);
    if (breakNow) break;
    total = newTotal;
  }
  return total;
};

var list = ["w","o","r","l","d"," ","p","i","e","r","o","g","i"];

var result = list.reducer((total,current,index,arr,stop)=>{
  if(current === " ") stop(); //when called, the loop breaks
  return total + current;
},'hello ');


console.log(result);
-1

You cannot break from inside of a reduce method. Depending on what you are trying to accomplish you could alter the final result (which is one reason you may want to do this)

[1, 1, 1].reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0); // returns 3

[1, 1, 1].reduce((a, b, c, d) => {
  if (c === 1 && b < 3) {
    return a + b + 1;
  } 
  return a + b;
}, 0); // now returns 4

Keep in mind: you cannot reassign the array parameter directly

[1, 1, 1].reduce( (a, b, c, d) => {
  if (c === 0) {
    d = [1, 1, 2];
  } 
  return a + b;
}, 0); // still returns 3

however (as pointed out below) you CAN affect the outcome by changing the array's contents:

[1, 1, 1].reduce( (a, b, c, d) => {
  if (c === 0) {
    d[2] = 100;
  } 
  return a + b;
}, 0); // now returns 102

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