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I just started using elastic beanstalk this week, and they already charged me 11.56$. Registrar for $11 which assumes because I bought my domain here. and $0.51 for route 53. I see this increasing every time I check for billing, what exactly are they charging me for? whatever rds they charge me $0.01, and for s3 I have already exceeded free tier limit....do they charge for every thing or am I just being stingy?

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    We can't really tell whether the charges are reasonable, we don't have enough information about your usage rates. You should check your account's billing page for usage details. You may also be interested in checking out Amazon's AWS Cost Calculator. – Brad Koch Mar 22 '16 at 4:57
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Yes, it rather does sound like you are being a bit stingy, or perhaps more accurately that you are purchasing services without familiarizing yourself with the pricing -- all of which is clearly documented and publicly available.

Yes, AWS does "charge for everything" you actually use, but they also charge for nothing you don't.

Everything on AWS, with few exceptions, is billed according to usage.

In S3, for example, 1 Gigabyte-Month is roughly $0.03. So, if you store 1 gigabyte of data for 30 days (1 × 30), that's $0.03... but if you store 30 gigabytes of data for 1 day (30 × 1), that is also going to cost $0.03.

You registered a domain. Pricing varies, but $11 (per year) seems reasonable.

You have a hosted zone in Route 53. That's $0.50 (per month) per hosted zone for each of the first 25 you create, with a steep discount after that ... a pretty sweet deal for reserving your domain a spot on a global network of anycast-routed DNS servers.

Your hosted zone would also handle queries, which are $0.40 per million. That number shouldn't be prorated, so I'm not sure where the $0.01 is coming from, without seeing the detail.

See Understanding Your Usage with Billing Reports. Every line item has a valid explanation and corresponds to published pricing.

They aren't out to squeeze you for every last cent -- quite the opposite -- you are only paying for what you actually use.

See also AWS Cloud Pricing Principles for perhaps a clearer understanding of the pay-as-you-go model.

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