5

I am new to using the Timer class, and so am trying to experiment with it before incorporating it into my project. I am wondering why this program does not terminate when the count reaches 5. The program keeps running even though the condition for the while loop is not satisfied.

package Timer;

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class demo {

    private static int count;


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ActionListener executeThis = new ActionListener(){


            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                System.out.println("Hello");
                count++;

            }

        };

        Timer timer = new Timer(500, executeThis);
        timer.setInitialDelay(1000);
        timer.start();

        while(count < 5){

        }
    }

}
3
2

for stoping the timer

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;


public class Test1 {
    private static AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ActionListener executeThis = new ActionListener(){


            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                System.out.println("Hello");
                count.getAndIncrement();

            }

        };

        Timer timer = new Timer(500, executeThis);
        timer.setInitialDelay(1000);
        timer.start();

        while(count.get() < 5){

        }
        timer.stop();

    }
}

but i think this will be the correct way to do this

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

/**
 * User: Romeo Sheshi 
 * Date: 21/03/16
 * Time: 12:12
 */
public class Test {
    private static AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);
    private static Timer timer;
    public static void main(String[] args) {


        ActionListener executeThis = new ActionListener(){


            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                System.out.println("Hello");

                if( count.incrementAndGet()==5){
                   stopTimer();
                }

            }

        };
        timer = new Timer(500, executeThis);
        timer.setInitialDelay(1000);
        startTimer();

        while ( count.get()<5){}

    }

    public static void startTimer(){
        timer.start();
    }

    public static void stopTimer(){
        timer.stop();
    }
}
16
  • yes i test it works, but i think is not the correct way to use the timer the anwser of BobTheBuilder is the correct way Mar 22 '16 at 9:42
  • I have copied your first excerpt and the program is still running while I'm writing this.
    – RubioRic
    Mar 22 '16 at 9:48
  • Sorry for that may be my ide stopping the program I'm going to make a test by terminal. Your observations could be right Mar 22 '16 at 9:51
  • Yes you right the first extracts is not working the problem is the counter not incrementing like tak3shi said in his answer. i change the first extract to make it work Mar 22 '16 at 10:01
  • @RubioRic I have basically the same code as the first example and it works fine in both the IDE and terminal. What OS are you using? Mar 22 '16 at 10:09
2

You should add:

timer.stop();

In order to stop the timer scheduling.

Another issue is the usage of non atomic variable in multi-threaded ennvironment. You can use AtomicInteger instead.

You can do it inside the actionPerformed method if count == 5.

3
  • This did not work, by the way. The program still continues.
    – lb91
    Mar 22 '16 at 9:15
  • Timer stops but program continues with your update. Some other actions are required.
    – RubioRic
    Mar 22 '16 at 9:40
  • 1
    The problem is there is the while-loop is never seeing the changes been made to count as they are on different threads, it's basically a dirty read problem Mar 22 '16 at 10:10
2

There are two issues:

  • The timer keeps running when not stopped.
  • The static count variable does not get synchronised between threads.

Check this explanation from Gray about synchronization between threads: Static variables and multithreading in java He explains that each thread has its own copy of a static variable. To avoid this declare the variable volatile.

For simple testing like this example, a volatile variable is all you need. For critical situations where you need a realtime synchronization between threads use AtomicInteger.

private static volatile int count;

Make sure to stop the timer with timer.stop(). It is not wrong to add a Thread.sleep in the loop, this safes CPU resources and allows thread synchronization for non-volatile variables.

while (count < 5) {
  Thread.sleep(10);
}    
timer.stop();

You can read more about the difference between a volatile variable and AtomicInteger here: What is the difference between atomic / volatile / synchronized?

2
  • You'd have to read deep into the memory model and concurrency in Java Mar 22 '16 at 10:56
  • While volatile is a step in the right direction, AtomicInteger is a far better solution (at least from my experience :P) Mar 22 '16 at 20:10
1

This is a supporting answer to Romeo Sheshi

This code has been test on:

  • Windows; Java 1.7.0_75 using Netbeans 8 AND the command line
  • MacOS 10.11.3; Java 1.8.0_20 using Netbeans 8 and the terminal

In both cases, the program terminated after the count reached 5

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class Test {

    private static AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ActionListener executeThis = new ActionListener() {

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                System.out.println("Hello");
                count.getAndIncrement();
                System.out.println(count);
            }

        };

        Timer timer = new Timer(500, executeThis);
        timer.setInitialDelay(1000);
        timer.start();

        while (count.get() < 5) {
        }
        System.out.println("On the outside...");
        timer.stop();
    }

}
-1

Best And Easiest Way to do this is --

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class demo {

    private static int count;


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ActionListener executeThis = new ActionListener(){


            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                System.out.println("Hello");
                count++;
                if(count==5){
                    System.exit(0);                 
                }
            }

        };

        Timer timer = new Timer(500, executeThis);
        timer.setInitialDelay(1000);
        timer.start();

        while(count < 5){

        }
    }

}
3
  • 1
    There's no need to use such a blunt method, nor does it explain why the while-loop doesn't exit (or at least doesn't exit when the count reaches 5, think I got it to 20) Mar 22 '16 at 10:50
  • 2
    the code is not running without while loop i dont know why...if u have solution then explain little bit Mar 23 '16 at 5:00
  • I did, have a look if you're interested ;) Mar 23 '16 at 6:01

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