Beginner Docker question here,

So I have a development environment in which I'm running a modular app, it is working using Docker Compose to run 3 containers: server, client, database.

The docker-compose.yml looks like this:

#############################
# Server
#############################
server:
  container_name: server
  domainname: server.dev
  hostname: server
  build: ./server
  working_dir: /app
  ports:
    - "3000:3000"
  volumes:
    - ./server:/app
  links:
    - database

#############################
# Client
#############################
client:
  container_name: client
  domainname: client.dev
  hostname: client
  image: php:5.6-apache
  ports:
     - "80:80"
  volumes:
   - ./client:/var/www/html

#############################
# Database
#############################
database:
  container_name: database
  domainname: database.dev
  hostname: database
  image: postgres:9.4
  restart: always
  environment:
    - POSTGRES_USER=postgres
    - POSTGRES_PASSWORD=root
    - POSTGRES_DB=dbdev
    - PG_TRUST_LOCALNET=true
  ports:
    - "5432:5432"
  volumes:
    - ./database/scripts:/docker-entrypoint-initdb.d # init scripts

You can see I'm assigning a .dev domainname to each one, this works fine to see one machine from another one (Docker internal network), for example here I'm pinging server.dev from client.dev's CLI:

    root@client:/var/www/html# ping server.dev
    PING server.dev (127.0.53.53): 56 data bytes
    64 bytes from 127.0.53.53: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.036 ms

This works great internally, but not on my host OS network.

For convenience, I would like to assigns domains in MY local network, not the Docker containers network so that I can for example type: client.dev on my browsers URL and load the Docker container.

Right now, I can only access if I use the Docker IP, which is dynamic:

client: 192.168.99.100:80
server: 192.168.99.100:3000
database: 192.168.99.100:5432

Is there an automated/convenient way to do this that doesn't involve me manually adding the IP to my /etc/hosts file ?

BTW I'm on OSX if that has any relevance.

Thanks!

Edit: I found this Github issue which seems to be related: https://github.com/docker/docker/issues/2335

As far as I understood, they seem to say that it is something that is not available outside of the box and they suggest external tools like:

Is that correct? And if so, which one should I go for in my particular scenario?

  • I've never used docker, but IPv4 addresses in the 127.0.0.0/8 range are defined as loopback. That would not allow any communicatios outside the machine – infixed Mar 22 '16 at 10:39
  • This is not much of a docker question, as it is a networking question. You want to know how your hostOS can have dynamic host aliases (in case docker ip changes) yes? I think you could combine a docker ps -a | grep 192 command with concepts from books.google.com/… – CtheGood Mar 22 '16 at 13:46
up vote 18 down vote accepted

OK,

so since it seems that there is no native way to do this with Docker, I finally opted for this alternate solution from Ryan Armstrong, which consists in dynamically updating the /etc/hosts file.

I chose this since it was convenient for me since this works as a script, and I already had a startup script, so I could just append this function in to it.

The following example creates a hosts entry named docker.local which will resolve to your docker-machine IP:

update-docker-host(){
    # clear existing docker.local entry from /etc/hosts
    sudo sed -i '' '/[[:space:]]docker\.local$/d' /etc/hosts

    # get ip of running machine
    export DOCKER_IP="$(echo ${DOCKER_HOST} | grep -oE '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}')"

    # update /etc/hosts with docker machine ip
    [[ -n $DOCKER_IP ]] && sudo /bin/bash -c "echo \"${DOCKER_IP}   docker.local\" >> /etc/hosts"
}

update-docker-host

This will automatically add or udpate the /etc/hosts line on my host OS when I start the Docker machine through my startup script.

Anyways, as I found out during my research, apart from editing the hosts file, you could also solve this problem by setting up a custom DNS server:

Also found several projects on Github which apparently aim to solve this problem, although I didn't try them:

  • Another rather elegant solution I've found for resolving container names to IP addresses from the docker host is nss-docker github.com/dex4er/nss-docker – cristoper Jun 15 at 18:04

Extending on @eduwass's own answer, here's what I did manually (without a script).

  1. As mentioned in the question, define the domainname: myapp.dev and hostname: www in the docker-compose.yml file
  2. Bring up your Docker containers as normal
  3. Run docker-compose exec client cat /etc/hosts to get an output of the container's hosts file (where client is your service name) (Output example: 172.18.0.6 www.myapp.dev)
  4. Open your local (host machine) /etc/hosts file and add that line: 172.18.0.6 server.server.dev

If your Docker service container changes IPs or does anything fancy you will want a more complex solution, but this is working for my simple needs at the moment.

  • 1
    I were searching in all internet for this. Thank you so much – davidsonsns Mar 8 at 21:19

In order to make whole domain for localhost you can use dnsmasq. In this case if you chose the domain .dev any subdomain will point to your container. But you have to know about problems with .dev zone

Or you can use bash script for launch your docker-compose which on start will add line to /etc/hosts and after you kill this process this line will removed

#!/usr/bin/env bash

sudo sed -i '1s;^;127.0.0.1    example.dev\n;' /etc/hosts

trap 'sudo sed -i "/example.dev/d" /etc/hosts' 2

docker-compose up

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