Lets say I have an array

[0, 132, 432, 342, 234]

What is the easiest way to get rid of the first element? (0)

  • 1
    'shift' is pop and 'unshift' is push. In which shift takes in the number of parameters to pop – Arun May 14 '13 at 10:19

11 Answers 11

up vote 249 down vote accepted

"pop"ing the first element of an Array is called "shift" ("unshift" being the operation of adding one element in front of the array).

  • 10
    Note this mutates the array and returns nil on an empty array. See drop for an alternative, as mentioned in the other answer. – Jay Oct 15 '15 at 21:37
a = [0,1,2,3]

a.drop(1)
# => [1, 2, 3] 

a
# => [0,1,2,3]

and additionally:

[0,1,2,3].drop(2)
=> [2, 3]

[0,1,2,3].drop(3)
=> [3] 
  • 14
    Best answer since (a) evaluates to the trimmed array, and it works as expected on an empty array: [].drop(1) => [] – fearless_fool Oct 21 '13 at 0:28
  • 4
    Also the best answer because OP said "what's the easiest way to get rid of the first element" – notaceo Feb 8 '14 at 6:21
  • 2
    This answer showcases that it is recommendable to scroll down even if the first and excepted answer has already more than 100 upvotes. Thank you. – maddin2code May 26 '15 at 16:33
  • 6
    +1 since this returns a modified array, whereas shift mutates the array in place and returns the shifted element (or nil if array was empty) – yuval Jan 15 '16 at 1:01

Use the shift method on array

>> x = [4,5,6]
=> [4, 5, 6]                                                            
>> x.shift 
=> 4
>> x                                                                    
=> [5, 6] 

If you want to remove n starting elements you can use x.shift(n)

  • 3
    the explanation should be merged into the correct answer since the content is the same – Yolgie Sep 17 '13 at 6:43
[0, 132, 432, 342, 234][1..-1]
=> [132, 432, 342, 234]

So unlike shift or slice this returns the modified array (useful for one liners).

  • 11
    One gotcha to watch out for: if the array is empty it returns nil: [][1..-1] => nil and not []. – Mohamad Jul 16 '13 at 1:26
  • 2
    Isn't [1,2,3].shift a one-liner? – thekingoftruth Oct 2 '13 at 23:50
  • 4
    @thekingoftruth: yes, but it evaluates to the element you threw away, not the rest of the array, so it takes another line. – fearless_fool Oct 21 '13 at 0:21
  • 4
    I like this answer because it's a one line expression that you can use anywhere. To avoid the [] vs nil problem, you can do arry[1..-1] || []. But arry.drop(1) is even better. – fearless_fool Oct 21 '13 at 0:23
  • I'm going with this cuz it's simple, how would you get the "array minus what got shifted out", I can't see how that'd work... It's the main answer but it doesn't seem to answer the question since this next step isn't obvious to a newbie! – Louis Maddox Dec 1 '13 at 13:02

This is pretty neat:

head, *tail = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
#==> head = 1, tail = [2, 3, 4, 5]

As written in the comments, there's an advantage of not mutating the original list.

  • 2
    very clever, and works perfectly. Once you do this, you'll have both variables "head" and "tail" at your disposal. – nfriend21 Jul 18 '13 at 16:25
  • 3
    This reminds me a lot of lisp. (let ((head (car mylist)) (tail (cdr mylist)) ...) – thekingoftruth Oct 22 '13 at 9:45
  • 2
    @thekingoftruth and reminds me of Haskell... ;-) – hurikhan77 Oct 23 '13 at 11:06
  • 4
    This version also has the advantage of not mutating the original list – Paweł Obrok Mar 17 '14 at 10:19
  • 1
    useful when extracting info without an aditional step header, *properties = CSV.read(file_path,encoding: 'ISO-8859-1') – juliangonzalez Feb 15 '17 at 17:23

or a.delete_at 0

Use shift method

array.shift(n) => Remove first n elements from array 
array.shift(1) => Remove first element

https://ruby-doc.org/core-2.2.0/Array.html#method-i-shift

You can use:

a.slice!(0)

slice! generalizes to any index or range.

You can use Array.delete_at(0) method which will delete first element.

 x = [2,3,4,11,0]
 x.delete_at(0) unless x.empty? # [3,4,11,0]
  • I don't think unless x.empty? is necessary. It simply returns nil if the index is out of range. – tknomad Jan 5 at 17:41

You can use:
arr - [arr[0]] or else arr - [arr.shift()] or simply arr.shift(1)

You can use:

 a.delete(a[0])   
 a.delete_at 0

Both can work

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