195

I would like some variables to be accessible everywhere in an Angular 2 in the Typescript language. How should I go about accomplishing this?

3
  • 2
    If they're static variables there's no need to use services. Just add a variable in some file and then import it everywhere you need it. Mar 22, 2016 at 16:00
  • Unfortunately Angular2 having exception at runtime, saying Uncaught ReferenceError: Settings is not defined. The class Settings with public static variables is set to export and have imported where it used.
    – Sen Jacob
    May 5, 2016 at 15:56
  • I know this post is old and that there is many valid answers. But like Eric mentioned. If its a simple value that you want to declare and have access to through out your application you can create a class and export the class with a static property. Static variables are associated with a class rather than an instance of the class. You can import the class and will be able to access the property from the class.directly. Sep 1, 2017 at 6:09

10 Answers 10

218

Here is the simplest solution w/o Service nor Observer:

Put the global variables in a file an export them.

//
// ===== File globals.ts    
//
'use strict';

export const sep='/';
export const version: string="22.2.2";    

To use globals in another file use an import statement: import * as myGlobals from 'globals';

Example:

// 
// ===== File heroes.component.ts    
//
import {Component, OnInit} from 'angular2/core';
import {Router} from 'angular2/router';
import {HeroService} from './hero.service';
import {HeroDetailComponent} from './hero-detail.component';
import {Hero} from './hero';
import * as myGlobals from 'globals'; //<==== this one (**Updated**)

export class HeroesComponent implements OnInit {
    public heroes: Hero[];
    public selectedHero: Hero;
    // 
    //
    // Here we access the global var reference.
    //  
    public helloString: string="hello " + myGlobals.sep + " there";

         ...

        }
    }

Thanks @eric-martinez

12
  • 3
    Got an error on the import statement. had to use import * as globs from 'globals'
    – Mike M
    Oct 31, 2016 at 12:46
  • 16
    Why did you use "require" instead of import from ?
    – Ayyash
    Nov 5, 2016 at 8:14
  • 4
    I would use export const instead of export var - you really want to make sure those global variables cannot be changed Dec 21, 2016 at 13:50
  • 1
    Importing like this is not valid in TypeScript anymore. Please update your answer. Correct would be: import * as myGlobals from 'globals'
    – Mick
    Jan 13, 2017 at 10:07
  • 8
    import * as myGlobals from './path/to/globals'; Feb 11, 2017 at 0:23
95

I like the solution from @supercobra too. I just would like to improve it slightly. If you export an object which contains all the constants, you could simply use es6 import the module without using require.

I also used Object.freeze to make the properties become true constants. If you are interested in the topic, you could read this post.

// global.ts

 export const GlobalVariable = Object.freeze({
     BASE_API_URL: 'http://example.com/',
     //... more of your variables
 });

Refer the module using import.

//anotherfile.ts that refers to global constants
import { GlobalVariable } from './path/global';

export class HeroService {
    private baseApiUrl = GlobalVariable.BASE_API_URL;

    //... more code
}
6
  • this to me is the best solution because (1) it's the simplest with least amount of code and (2) it doesn't require you to Inject some darn service into every single component or place you want to use it in, nor does it require you to register it in @NgModule. I can't for the life of me figure out why it would be necessary to create an Angular 2 Service to do this, but perhaps there's something I'm overlooking? I'm using this great solution for now but please do let me know why the other more complicated answers here are better?
    – FireDragon
    Dec 13, 2016 at 1:16
  • 10
    Your GlobalVariable is not a variable. Its a constant.
    – Priya R
    Dec 22, 2016 at 19:17
  • @PriyaR LOL, yes, you are right. I assumed the main objective of the question was to have a safe way to access some values globally, so I improvised. Otherwise, feel free to change const to var, you get your variable.
    – Tim Hong
    Dec 22, 2016 at 22:53
  • The down side of Object.freeze is that values are not typed. Anyway, wrapping values in a class is a better design from my perspective. So we have to choose between typed properties and true constants.
    – Harps
    Jan 24, 2018 at 16:09
  • how to set GlobalVariable.BASE_API_URL in another component..? May 30, 2018 at 6:01
66

A shared service is the best approach

export class SharedService {
  globalVar:string;
}

But you need to be very careful when registering it to be able to share a single instance for whole your application. You need to define it when registering your application:

bootstrap(AppComponent, [SharedService]);

But not to define it again within the providers attributes of your components:

@Component({
  (...)
  providers: [ SharedService ], // No
  (...)
})

Otherwise a new instance of your service will be created for the component and its sub-components.

You can have a look at this question regarding how dependency injection and hierarchical injectors work in Angular 2:

You should notice that you can also define Observable properties in the service to notify parts of your application when your global properties change:

export class SharedService {
  globalVar:string;
  globalVarUpdate:Observable<string>;
  globalVarObserver:Observer;

  constructor() {
    this.globalVarUpdate = Observable.create((observer:Observer) => {
      this.globalVarObserver = observer;
    });
  }

  updateGlobalVar(newValue:string) {
    this.globalVar = newValue;
    this.globalVarObserver.next(this.globalVar);
  }
}

See this question for more details:

5
  • Seems this one is different though. Seems @Rat2000 thinks our answer is wrong. I usually leave this decision to others than peaple providing competing answers but if he is convinced our answers are wrong then I think it's valid. The docs he linked to in a comment to my answer mention that it's DISCOURAGED but I see no disadvantage and the arguments in the docs are quite weak. It's also quite common to add providers to bootstrap. What would be the purpose of this argument anyway. And what about HTTP_PROVIDERS and similar, should they also not be added to bootstrap()? Mar 22, 2016 at 16:04
  • 2
    Yes I just read the argument and the section in the doc. Honnestly I don't really understand why it's discouraged from the doc. Is it a way to define a logical split: what is Angular2 core specific (routing providers, http providers) when bootstrapping and what is application-specific in the application component injector. That said we can only have one sub injector (the application one) for the root one (defined when bootstrapping). Does I miss something? Moreover in the doc regarding hierarchical injectors, service providers are defined within the root injector ;-) Mar 22, 2016 at 16:14
  • 3
    The only argument I see is that keeping the scope as narrow as possible and using the root component is at least in theory slightly narrower than using bootstrap() but in practice it doesn't matter. I think listing them in boostrap() makes the code easier to understand. A component has providers, directives, a template. I find this overloaded without global providers listed there as well. Therefore I prefer bootstrap(). Mar 22, 2016 at 16:18
  • 2
    and how does one reference such global variables? even after bootstrapping the service, calling alert(globalVar) results in an error.
    – phil294
    Dec 20, 2016 at 18:12
  • I haven't tried this yet, but you will want something like: alert(this.SharedService.globalVar) Mar 16, 2017 at 13:30
40

See for example Angular 2 - Implementation of shared services

@Injectable() 
export class MyGlobals {
  readonly myConfigValue:string = 'abc';
}

@NgModule({
  providers: [MyGlobals],
  ...
})

class MyComponent {
  constructor(private myGlobals:MyGlobals) {
    console.log(myGlobals.myConfigValue);
  }
}

or provide individual values

@NgModule({
  providers: [{provide: 'myConfigValue', useValue: 'abc'}],
  ...
})

class MyComponent {
  constructor(@Inject('myConfigValue') private myConfigValue:string) {
    console.log(myConfigValue);
  }
}
8
  • Since Angular2 beta 7(I think) you should not register your service directly in the root component(aka bootstrap). You can however inject there a specific provider if you want to override something in your application.
    – Mihai
    Mar 22, 2016 at 15:51
  • 1
    Not sure what you mean. Of course you can register a service in bootstrap(). bootstrap() and root component are two different things. When you call bootstrap(AppComponent, [MyService]) you register the service in boostrap() and AppComponent is the root component. The docs mention somewhere that it's prefered to register providers (service) in the root components providers: ['MyService'] but I haven't found any argument in favor or against bootstrap() or root component yet. Mar 22, 2016 at 15:54
  • You can find your argument in the angular 2guide section Dependency Injection( angular.io/docs/ts/latest/guide/dependency-injection.html ). Like they say, you can do it but it is DISCOURAGED. This user is asking for the best way to iinject something witch clearly your solution is not corect. same goes for @ThierryTemplier
    – Mihai
    Mar 22, 2016 at 15:59
  • 1
    I think the more important quote from the Angular doc is "The bootstrap provider option is intended for configuring and overriding Angular's own preregistered services, such as its routing support." I rarely put services in bootstrap myself, and I'm glad to see the docs now suggest that. Mar 22, 2016 at 19:44
  • 1
    don't forget to export the class
    – Demodave
    Feb 15, 2018 at 14:46
19

Create Globals class in app/globals.ts:

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';

Injectable()
export class Globals{
    VAR1 = 'value1';
    VAR2 = 'value2';
}

In your component:

import { Globals } from './globals';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-app',
    providers: [ Globals ],
    template: `<h1>My Component {{globals.VAR1}}<h1/>`
})
export class AppComponent {
    constructor(private globals: Globals){
    }
}

Note: You can add Globals service provider directly to the module instead of the component, and you will not need to add as a provider to every component in that module.

@NgModule({
    imports: [...],
    declarations: [...],
    providers: [ Globals ],
    bootstrap: [ AppComponent ]
})
export class AppModule {
}
3
  • This is the best answer, as it offers a more portable approach than having to add the service to each component across the app. Thank you! Jan 12, 2017 at 20:47
  • 5
    The code is working. But note that injecting class Globals with also adding it to providers: [ ... ] means you cannot change a value inside one component and then ask for the updated value inside a second component. Every time you inject Globals it is a fresh instance. If you want to change this behaviour, simply do NOT add Globals as provider.
    – Timo Bähr
    Jan 23, 2017 at 13:58
  • 1
    just a note, it should be @Injectable() Apr 18, 2018 at 9:21
13

IMHO for Angular2 (v2.2.3) the best way is to add services that contain the global variable and inject them into components without the providers tag inside the @Component annotation. By this way you are able to share information between components.

A sample service that owns a global variable:

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core'

@Injectable()
export class SomeSharedService {
  public globalVar = '';
}

A sample component that updates the value of your global variable:

import { SomeSharedService } from '../services/index';

@Component({
  templateUrl: '...'
})
export class UpdatingComponent {

  constructor(private someSharedService: SomeSharedService) { }

  updateValue() {
    this.someSharedService.globalVar = 'updated value';
  }
}

A sample component that reads the value of your global variable:

import { SomeSharedService } from '../services/index';

@Component({
  templateUrl: '...'
})
export class ReadingComponent {

  constructor(private someSharedService: SomeSharedService) { }

  readValue() {
    let valueReadOut = this.someSharedService.globalVar;
    // do something with the value read out
  }
}

Note that providers: [ SomeSharedService ] should not be added to your @Component annotation. By not adding this line injection will always give you the same instance of SomeSharedService. If you add the line a freshly created instance is injected.

3
  • But without adding the line of providers, I got an error like this: Unhandled Promise rejection: No provider for SomeSharedService
    – Rocky
    Mar 16, 2017 at 14:14
  • I see. I should add providers: [SomeSharedService] in the parent module file. Thanks.
    – Rocky
    Mar 16, 2017 at 14:18
  • This doesn't work when we are lazy loading modules.
    – lpradhap
    Nov 11, 2018 at 1:10
12

I don't know the best way, but the easiest way if you want to define a global variable inside of a component is to use window variable to write like this:

window.GlobalVariable = "what ever!"

you don't need to pass it to bootstrap or import it other places, and it is globally accessibly to all JS (not only angular 2 components).

6
  • 1
    I'd say it's the worst way. Using a static variable isn't more complicated but isn't that ugly either ;-) Jun 30, 2016 at 17:19
  • 2
    I agree it makes difficult to manage. However I ended to use them in development till I find what I want to put in productions. In static variable you have to import them again and again everywhere you want to use, beside there was a case I was producing my view on the go with jquery in angular components - there was no template, and to add events to produced DOM using static variable is pain. Jun 30, 2016 at 20:48
  • 1
    Plus, it is not static, you can change the value from everywhere! Jun 30, 2016 at 20:56
  • 1
    It also wrecks server side rendering. Stay away from directly manipulating the window or document.
    – Erik Honn
    Oct 28, 2016 at 8:23
  • 3
    Agreed. but I personally don't follow any guideline in my life (if I could do better than that). May 21, 2019 at 14:01
9

That's the way I use it:

global.ts

export var server: string = 'http://localhost:4200/';
export var var2: number = 2;
export var var3: string = 'var3';

to use it just import like that:

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Http, Headers, RequestOptions } from '@angular/http';
import { Observable } from 'rxjs/Rx';
import * as glob from '../shared/global'; //<== HERE

@Injectable()
export class AuthService {
    private AuhtorizationServer = glob.server
}

EDITED: Droped "_" prefixed as recommended.

1
4

I think the best way is to share an object with global variables throughout your application by exporting and importing it where you want.

First create a new .ts file for example globals.ts and declare an object. I gave it an Object type but you also could use an any type or {}

export let globalVariables: Object = {
 version: '1.3.3.7',
 author: '0x1ad2',
 everything: 42
};

After that import it

import {globalVariables} from "path/to/your/globals.ts"

And use it

console.log(globalVariables);
3

I like the answer of @supercobra, but I would use the const keyword as it is in ES6 already available:

//
// ===== File globals.ts    
//
'use strict';

export const sep='/';
export const version: string="22.2.2"; 

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