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So I am trying to import a module, and test methods from a class in that module.

Here is an example of a method.

def production_warning(self, targetenv):
    if targetenv == 'prdv':
        prodwarning1 = raw_input("WARNING: You are deploying to the production environment.  Are you sure you want to do this?   Y/N:  ").upper()
        if prodwarning1 == "N":
            sys.exit()
        prodwarning2 = raw_input("DEPLOYING TO PRDV, ARE YOU REALLY, REALLY SURE?  Y/N:  ").upper()
        if prodwarning2 == "N":
            sys.exit()
    else:
        return True

Here is an example of a test I am trying to write.

def production_warning():
    try:
        assert test.production_warning('prdv') is not errors
        assert test.validate_params('fakeenv') is errors
        print "Test Passed {0}/5: validate_params".format(counter)
        test_db_refresh()
    except:
        print "Test Failed {0}/5: validate_params".format(counter)
        test_db_refresh()

def db_refresh_prompt():
    # assert test.db_refresh_prompt() is not errors
    global counter
    counter += 1
    print "Test Passed {0}/5: db_refresh_prompt".format(counter)

production_warning()
db_refresh_prompt()
etc()

How do I check if an error is raised? At the end of the day I'm trying to run through all of these tests and for each function, if no exceptions are raised, print "Success". If an exception is raised, move on to the next test. People seem to keep pointing me in the direction of "calling your function will automatically raise an exception if there is one", but this will stop my test whenever an exception is thrown and I don't want that, I want to continue on to the next test.

I can work around this by doing:

def validate_params():
try:
    assert test.validate_params('hackenv-re', 'test.username') is not errors
    assert test.validate_params('fakeenv', 'test.username') is errors
    assert test.validate_params('hackevn-re', 'vagrant') is errors
    global counter
    counter += 1
    print "Test Passed {0}/5: validate_params".format(counter)
    test_db_refresh()
except:
    print "Test Failed {0}/5: validate_params".format(counter)
    test_db_refresh()

but it seems like that defeats the purpose of using unittest in the first place? I thought with unittest I can just assert if an exception is raised and it returns a T/F that I can do whatever I want with.

Hope that is enough information.

Based on many of the answers given, I'm assuming there is nothing built in to unittest where I can do assertRaise (I believe this is used in Django)

  • So are you using unittest or not? Your code doesn't look like you are. – Stop harming Monica Mar 22 '16 at 19:17
  • All I'm trying to do is use unittest and find a way to test if an exception is raised. That's it. How do I check if an exception is raised? – david Mar 22 '16 at 20:05
  • What do you want to use from unittest if it's not classes? Everything in unittest is classes. You just want to import unittest and then forget about it? – Stop harming Monica Mar 22 '16 at 20:12
  • So I cannot use unittest without using the class ? – david Mar 22 '16 at 20:14
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Asserting that the tested code does not raise exceptions comes for free, you don't need to write code for that.

  • If I have 5 functions similar to production_warning that run tests, and I want to run all 5 in one pass, an exception will cause the whole thing to stop. – david Mar 22 '16 at 20:06
  • Any failed assertion would cause the whole thing to stop. So you don't want to assert after all? – Stop harming Monica Mar 22 '16 at 20:16
  • ohhhh, I guess not. I don't want it to stop. – david Mar 22 '16 at 20:19
  • Any failed assertion would cause the whole thing to stop unless you wrap it in a try - except clause. – Stop harming Monica Mar 22 '16 at 20:28

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