132

Alright so I just update Xcode to 7.3 and now I get this warning:

'var' parameters are deprecated and will be removed in Swift 3

How to fix this when I need to use the var in this function:

public func getQuestionList(var language: String) -> NSArray {
    if self.data.count > 0 {
        if (language.isEmpty) {
            language = "NL"
        }
        return self.data.objectForKey("questionList" + language) as! NSArray
    }

    return NSArray()
}
8
  • 6
    How about public func getQuestionList(inout language: String) -> NSArray Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 20:58
  • 3
    No, this is not a suitable replacement. OP probably does not want getQuestion to have any side effects. Commented Mar 31, 2016 at 3:15
  • 7
    I honestly have no idea why they would even consider removing this. It was one of the features that made swift awesome! Commented Apr 5, 2016 at 15:13
  • Never used it myself and don't understand the fuss. Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 5:31
  • @MikeTaverne (late reply) Consider the following function: func foo(_ bar: int) { /*use bar*/ bar+=1; foo(bar); }. This is impossible without var params. You either need to create a separate var within the function and copy the value, or mark the param as inout. The former is slow, the latter causes undefined behaviour. Many algorithms use recursion like this.
    – kevin
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 12:55

9 Answers 9

109

The discussion of the removal of Var from a function parameter is fully documented within this submission on GitHub: Remove Var Parameters

In that document you will find that people often confuse var parameters with inout parameters. A var parameter simply means that the parameter is mutable within the context of the function, while with an inout parameter the value of the parameter at the point of return will be copied out of the function and into the caller's context.

The correct way to solve this problem is to remove var from the parameter and introduce a local var variable. At the top of the routine copy the parameter's value into that variable.

9
  • 53
    I don't understand this change at all, why would having to write another line to create a mutable local var be better than just defining the param as a var? Commented Mar 23, 2016 at 0:22
  • For me this change is good because it is picking up situations where I should have implemented a local variable but I didn't because I took the easy way out and accepted (old) Swift's suggestion of making the input parameter a var
    – dawid
    Commented Mar 25, 2016 at 21:20
  • 4
    I'm with @RossBarbish on this. So... this is being removed because lazy developers can't distinguish between inout and var parameters? Pfff... Commented Apr 5, 2016 at 15:13
  • 3
    This seems awfully unnecessary..., they should have kept both options. Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 14:27
  • 1
    Probably swift was declaring a local variable overtop of the parameter behind the scenes anyway. Now we have to do it manually. No change in performance, but we lost convenience to help beginners with a simple concept. Commented May 5, 2017 at 14:08
86

Have you tried to assign to a new var

public func getQuestionList(language: String) -> NSArray {
    var lang = language
    if self.data.count > 0 {
        if (lang.isEmpty) {
            lang = "NL"
        }
        return self.data.objectForKey("questionList" + lang) as! NSArray
    }

    return NSArray()
}
13
  • 11
    Not really what I think the OP wanted
    – brimstone
    Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 21:07
  • 6
    I would have understood OP's question the same way as @garana. OP doesn't use inout in their question, they just mutate a pre-existing variable locally.
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 21:15
  • 12
    Actually this is the correct solution. Please see the Swift evolution issue that proposed this change: github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/… Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 21:35
  • 9
    @TimVermeulen Everyone want to use a progressive language. Apple can develop their language by many ways not by changing the syntax every single month. As you know, a ton of online document and code snippet have been expiring or being outdated because of Apple. Developers have to come to this site to ask for help with many stupid questions repeatedly because of it. Syntax must be solid from the beginning if Apple want more developers to be good at it.
    – TomSawyer
    Commented Mar 24, 2016 at 16:52
  • 30
    Use var language = language, if you don't want to introduce another variable name (which was the main advantage of the var parameter in the first place imo)
    – Elijah
    Commented Mar 27, 2016 at 20:03
67

Just add this one line at the beginning of the function:

var language = language

and the rest of your code can stay unchanged, like this:

public func getQuestionList(language: String) -> NSArray {
    var language = language
    if self.data.count > 0 {
        if (language.isEmpty) {
            language = "NL"
        }
        return self.data.objectForKey("questionList" + language) as! NSArray
    }

    return NSArray()
}
10
  • 5
    The best answer by far. Only requires changing one line. Commented Mar 31, 2016 at 3:18
  • 1
    But looks so unnatural @James
    – asyncwait
    Commented May 19, 2016 at 15:31
  • 1
    I feel this is the best answer as it keeps the same name. Similar to how other common languages does it.
    – Sentry.co
    Commented May 23, 2016 at 21:01
  • 1
    @RiverSatya Why not just use the parameter directly? Commented Oct 17, 2016 at 11:48
  • 1
    Really an awesome suggestion. We will implement it this way in Swiftify :)
    – Crulex
    Commented Feb 21, 2018 at 10:26
14

A lot of people are suggesting an inout parameter, but that's really not what they're designed for. Besides, it doesn't allow calling the function with a let constant, nor with a string literal. Why don't you simply add the default value to the function signature?

public func getQuestionList(language language: String = "NL") -> NSArray {
    if data.count > 0 {
        return data.objectForKey("questionList" + language) as! NSArray
    } else {
        return NSArray()
    }
}

Just make sure to not call getQuestionList with the empty string in case you want the default language, but just leave out the parameter:

let list = getQuestionList() // uses the default "NL" language
2
  • 4
    I also don't understand why everybody jumped on the inout solution when OP wasn't even using that in the beginning...
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 21:14
  • 1
    They were assuming that var and inout did the same thing.
    – ryantxr
    Commented Mar 22, 2016 at 21:14
1
public func getQuestionList(language: inout String) -> NSArray {
if self.data.count > 0 {
    if (language.isEmpty) {
        language = "NL"
    }
    return self.data.objectForKey("questionList" + language) as! NSArray
}

return NSArray()

}

1
0

I think @Harris and @garanda answers are the best approach.

Anyway in your case, there isn't need of a var, you can do:

public func getQuestionList(language: String) -> NSArray {
    if self.data.count > 0 {
        return self.data.objectForKey("questionList" + (language.isEmpty ? "NL" : language)) as! NSArray
    }
    return NSArray()
}
0

https://developer.apple.com/library/content/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/Swift_Programming_Language/Functions.html

In-Out Parameters

Function parameters are constants by default. Trying to change the value of a function parameter from within the body of that function results in a compile-time error. This means that you can’t change the value of a parameter by mistake. If you want a function to modify a parameter’s value, and you want those changes to persist after the function call has ended, define that parameter as an in-out parameter instead.

You write an in-out parameter by placing the inout keyword right before a parameter’s type. An in-out parameter has a value that is passed in to the function, is modified by the function, and is passed back out of the function to replace the original value. For a detailed discussion of the behavior of in-out parameters and associated compiler optimizations, see In-Out Parameters.

You can only pass a variable as the argument for an in-out parameter. You cannot pass a constant or a literal value as the argument, because constants and literals cannot be modified. You place an ampersand (&) directly before a variable’s name when you pass it as an argument to an in-out parameter, to indicate that it can be modified by the function.

NOTE

In-out parameters cannot have default values, and variadic parameters cannot be marked as inout.

Here’s an example of a function called swapTwoInts(::), which has two in-out integer parameters called a and b:

func swapTwoInts(_ a: inout Int, _ b: inout Int) {
    let temporaryA = a
    a = b
    b = temporaryA
}

The swapTwoInts(::) function simply swaps the value of b into a, and the value of a into b. The function performs this swap by storing the value of a in a temporary constant called temporaryA, assigning the value of b to a, and then assigning temporaryA to b.

You can call the swapTwoInts(::) function with two variables of type Int to swap their values. Note that the names of someInt and anotherInt are prefixed with an ampersand when they are passed to the swapTwoInts(::) function:

var someInt = 3
var anotherInt = 107
swapTwoInts(&someInt, &anotherInt)
print("someInt is now \(someInt), and anotherInt is now \(anotherInt)")
// Prints "someInt is now 107, and anotherInt is now 3"

The example above shows that the original values of someInt and anotherInt are modified by the swapTwoInts(::) function, even though they were originally defined outside of the function.

NOTE

In-out parameters are not the same as returning a value from a function. The swapTwoInts example above does not define a return type or return a value, but it still modifies the values of someInt and anotherInt. In-out parameters are an alternative way for a function to have an effect outside of the scope of its function body.

0

Here is another idea. My use case was to pass around a string array to append to it, for which the array must be passed in mutably. I did not want to have state in my class for this either. So I made a class that holds the array and pass that. Depending on your use case it may seem silly to have a class that holds just that one variable.

private class StringBuilder {
    var buffer: [String] = []

    func append(_ str: String) {
        buffer.append(str)
    }

    func toString() -> String {
        return buffer.joined()
    }
}

I only use append and joined methods on the array so it was easy to change the type with minimal other changes to my code.

Some example usage:

private func writeMap(map: LevelMap, url: URL) -> Bool {
    let buffer = StringBuilder()

    if !writeHeader(map: map, buffer: buffer) {
        return false
    }
    if !writeFloors(map: map, buffer: buffer) {
        return false
    }

    let content = buffer.toString()
    do {
        try content.write(to: url, atomically: true, encoding: .utf8)
        return true
    } catch {}
    return false
}

private func writeHeader(map: LevelMap, buffer: StringBuilder) -> Bool {
    buffer.append("something here ...\n")
    return true
}
1
  • My answer is if you WANT the original value as seen by the caller to be modified. If you just wanted to be able to locally reassign the value but not have it affect the caller, other answers above deal with that.
    – webjprgm
    Commented Feb 12, 2017 at 1:56
-1

I think you should inout instead, following the recommendations given in this discussion.

To put it in context, in your example:

public func getQuestionList(var language: String) 

should be replaced by:

public func getQuestionList(language: inout String) 
2
  • The first 2 comments to the question explain why this can be a bad fix: any changes made to the variable ('language' here) inside the func in the past did NOT affect the variable in the calling routine -- by design with the var keyword, whereas with inout they do. In a world where both var and inout exist, and the choice was made to use one, just swapping in the other will cause things to work not-as-intended. If the var keyword is unavailable, then there's a choice: use inout or the 'var lang = language' approach, depending on the desired scope of changes. Commented Mar 29, 2023 at 22:16
  • Well, I’m not talking about refactoring but more about using it as the desired behavior.
    – SHANNAX
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 15:24

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