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I have problem with understanding how the methods below work. I have class Calc and method for multiplication, first method use typical getters, second method can access straight to private attribute with type conversion. My question is, how it is possible, that number1 have access to number2's private attribute.

private int number;

public Calc multiplication(Calc z)
 {
        return new Calc(this.number*z.getNumber());
 }

 public Calc multiplication(Calc z)
 {
        return new Calc(this.number*((Calc)z).number);
 }

test()
{
number1 = new Calc(2);
number2 = new Calc(3);
number1.multiplication(number2);
}
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  • It's just how access modifiers work in Java. You are not the first person to comment that this is arguably a bit odd. By the way you don't need to cast z to Calc - it's already Calc. Mar 22, 2016 at 22:17
  • z is already a Calc why using type cast as ((Calc)z)?
    – Yusuf K.
    Mar 22, 2016 at 22:20
  • 1
    I call shenanigans, this can't compile with two methods with the exact same signature like that.
    – user177800
    Mar 22, 2016 at 22:23

2 Answers 2

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From Java Tutorials:

The private modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed in its own class.

It doesn't matter if the member belongs to a different instance of the same class. As long as class is the same, methods in one instance have access to private members of another instance.

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here number1 object reference is not directly accessing number variable but it is accessing with help of number2 object reference and vice versa.

The private modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed in its own class

it doesn't matter if the member belongs to a different instance of the same class. As long as class is the same, methods in one instance have access to private members of another instance.

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